Kreg Owners' Community

In every shop there's a tool...No, not the person working in the shop, the actual tool itself.....and that tool, in that shop...is a hated tool. 

 

You see, It doesn't matter how expensive or new that tool is, or how shiny or sharp you keep it.  It doesn't even matter what colour or what brand it is.  You simply just...hate it.

 

For me, it's the Jig Saw.  And not just "A" jigsaw...THE jigsaw.  I've owned several.  From cheapy little black and decker toss-away's to mid-line Ridgid's and Dewalts, to higher end Bosch barrel grips and what have you.  I've spent countless dollars, on countless tools, making countless cuts for countless hours....and i've come to a conclusion.......

 

I hate Jig saws.

Views: 1743

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Betty, it is really all in the cutter itself, if you don't buy a good one they just don't work, don't use the ones from Hpme Depot etc. get one from a company that sells them say for stained glass work, these are awsome and have a swivel head on them, and they last much longer.
That's encouraging! I'll look for a better quality cutter and see if I can finally put glass in the frames I make. Thanks!

John Miller said:
Betty, it is really all in the cutter itself, if you don't buy a good one they just don't work, don't use the ones from Hpme Depot etc. get one from a company that sells them say for stained glass work, these are awsome and have a swivel head on them, and they last much longer.

Betty, Cutting glass is all in putting the correct amount of pressure on the tool and holding the cutter correctly. Make sure you buy a cutter with a carbide cutting wheel. Also dip the cutter in vegetable oil, that will keep the score line hot. And never go back over a score line. 

 

 

 

 

I have a B&D and a Skill JIG saw, The B&D I use for fast roughing out and the Skill for smooth cuts, Remember to let the saw do the cutting, excessive pressure against the blade make them break and causes the cut to wander. I never cut anything over three quarters of an inch if at all possible. Thicker materials I like using a router and making several passes using a template. I have used painters tape to help reduce tear out and chipping, for soft wood try a Vynal tape, I find it stops break out on the edge of the material, it even works on plywood. When cutting Plexi first use a sharp knife and trace the cut, on both sides if possible, this helps insure a clean edge, I worked in the molding of plastic for 35 years, then fasten a thin peice of what ever scrap you over the plexi, this reduces the bounce on the plexi and helps reduces cracking and breakage as well as reducing the melting of the plastic being cut. The bigest thing is pressure, let the saw blade have time to do what it was designed for, because you dislike it soo much you hurry the work, be patient, take the time needed to get what you want a good cut. Good Luck.

Agreed.  My problem is it always works on the test cut and nevar when it counts.   1, 2, 3 snap always works when it doesn't matter...  Ugh.

I love my jig saw. I hate my simple little glass cutter. I have yet to get a piece of glass to score and snap. I grew up watching Pop do it with such ease! It's a frustrating little gadget!
The only tool I can not tolerate is the tool that does not perform the way it is supposed to even though it is being used correctly. I had a fellow tell me that there were three "MUSTS" when it came to jig saws. The first was that you MUST use a straight edge to guide the saw to cut a straight line. The second MUST was to use a sharp blade at all times. The third was that you MUST not put force or pressure on the saw, but let it cut at it's own rate.
I hate to love my jig saw.  I have had several different ones over the years like most of you.  I have even destroyed a few because of frustration and just wanting to "get the job done".  Currently I have a Ryobi that I absolutely hate with a passion.  I also recently purchased a Dewalt (yesterday).  The Dewalt had a plastic "guard" on the bottom to help reduce scratches and help it glide smoothly across the work piece.  So far I love my Dewalt.  It came with a wide vented blade that cuts really nice.  I have also learned to take my time when using my jig saw, they just work better.  Both mine are cordless because I'm not always by a plugin when using them.  I am planning on buying a corded Dewalt after getting my cordless now though.
I have no problem with jig saws, but I use them less and less.  I have little Makita finishing saw that belonged to my Dad with a 3.5" blade that will sink right into a piece of plywood or OSB and cut a hole for a switch box or what ever that keeps me from having to drill a pilot hole.  I have big Rigid band saw that I dislike.  It is very hard to control and get out of alignment real easy.  It rarely get used any more. It is also slow, but it will cut 5" thick piece of lumber and make a mess of it.
I have a list:  Shovel, digging bar, and posthole diggers. 
Your comment brought to mind a project I am going to try in the spring. I have an old one man buck saw and the neighbor has a large log that chain saws won't span. I am going totry and slab off a couple of pieces to make tabels from. I will update everyone as to weather it will make the least favorite tool list.

My Porter Cable worm drive jig saw (model 548) is one of my favorite tools of all time.  You will not find a smoother running jig saw.  Problem is, I don't think they make them anymore, but, lucky for me, I have mine.

I really cannot think of a tool that I hate, though the tool which I hate using the most is a shovel.......

PC548

Larry

 

 

I don't think i've seen anything quite like that PC Worm-drive?  Truthfully, i don't think i ever knew that there are/were worm drive jigsaws.....

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Pantry slides for heavy application

  Recently purchased two 96" tall pantry cabinets that are 23" deep that only came with two adjustable shelves and two fixed, (one at about 55" and one at the very bottom).  Shelf holes in the walls are drilled 2" O.C.  Like most store-bought…Continue

Tags: drawer, slides, pantry, pull-out, 75-Lb

Started by Paul Coon in General Woodworking Aug 11.

Miter Saw Recommendation

I’m looking to upgrade my miter saw. I’m willing to invest a good amount of money to get one with the precision pocket hole joinery requires. Would anyone like to offer a recommended model?

Started by Joe Racz in Beginners' Zone Jul 22.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 8 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_