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I recently purchased a set of ryobi router bits and used them very little. now its seems they are dull and not cutting good. anyone know where i can find some reviews on router bits and wood drill bits. Or have any recommendations on what brand to buy/not buy?

Thanks

DW

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hi derrick, the old saying of you get what you pay for is true, buy good quality bits, cmt or summerfeld bits, you pay more up front but they last. hope this helps, good luck.

ok thanks, never been a ryobi fan anyways but they were on sale when i bought them. Will not buy anymore Ryobi tools

 

Don't give up on them yet. Did you clean them after you used them or just put them back in the case? Doesn't take much crud for a router bit, or even a saw blade, to act dull. Also, are they carbide or HSS. If HSS and you ran 'em through some MDF, just pitch 'em.

Generally, my experience with Ryobi is they put out a pretty decent value. True, they are not deWalt or Milwaukee but they don't cost anywhere near that either. Just like deWalt and Milwaukee are not Festool quality either.

Hi Derrick.

I agree with John but i would like to add something. 

The material you're using the bits on may have something to do with this problem. Products like MDF and Particle board will dull a bit faster because of the glues used in the manufacturing process.

I have a set of Ryobi carbide router bits and they work fine.

They'll perform nicely, for most homeowner do-it-yourself projects.

 

I also have several of the Rocklers carbide router bits.

 

Clean the bits after each use, before storing them away.

 

Apply a silicon spray lube to the bits, cutting edges, before putting them to use.

Only use a small amount of lube---allow the excess to drip off.

When you turn on your router, most of the access lube will fly off.

 

Carbide router bits can be sharpened, by using a diamond file.

I use 600 grit, followed by a 1200 grit, for the final touch-up/sharpness.

 

''feed and speed'' is key to obtain the optimum routed results.

Make cuts in 2 or more passes---width and depth.

Make practice cuts on scrap material, until you get the hang of it.

You'll learn by ''touch & feel'' and the sound of the router motor.
Keep the the bit moving, to avoid burn marks.

Hi Ken - I agree with everything except the silicon spray lube. That stuff can give you fits with finishes. Even if it doesn't come directly from the router bit but get slung across the shop and lands on something you want to finish later or drifts around the shop. The thing here is, you likely won't know thats the problem. It could be days later and you get fisheye or something and not associate it with using silicone near the project. I don't even allow the stuff in the shop.

Ken Darga said:

I have a set of Ryobi carbide router bits and they work fine.

They'll perform nicely, for most homeowner do-it-yourself projects.

 

I also have several of the Rocklers carbide router bits.

 

Clean the bits after each use, before storing them away.

 

Apply a silicon spray lube to the bits, cutting edges, before putting them to use.

Only use a small amount of lube---allow the excess to drip off.

When you turn on your router, most of the access lube will fly off.

 

Carbide router bits can be sharpened, by using a diamond file.

I use 600 grit, followed by a 1200 grit, for the final touch-up/sharpness.

 

''feed and speed'' is key to obtain the optimum routed results.

Make cuts in 2 or more passes---width and depth.

Make practice cuts on scrap material, until you get the hang of it.

You'll learn by ''touch & feel'' and the sound of the router motor.
Keep the the bit moving, to avoid burn marks.

John,

Thanks for the heads-up, re the material getting ''slung'' all over the shop.

(I discontinued using it---15 minutes ago).

re using ''silicon---I read it somewhere in one of those forums re router bits''.

http://www.routerforums.com/router-bits-types-usage/11241-proper-ro...

 

http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/prodinfo.asp?number=BBLUB-2OZ

http://www.talkshopbot.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2034

http://www.emisupply.com/catalog/sprayway-sp295-woodworkers-dry-lub...

 

How about the ''dry-lube'' variety?

When applied, the carrier evaporates and leaves a thin whitish film.

I use the dry-lube on my firearms, as well as many other uses---appling only a small amount---just a thin film, does the job.

A wetted surface attracts and holds dust, which is unacceptable for many uses.

 

http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip38.html

 

http://www.empiremfg.com/products/otc/rbl/index.html

 

I personally have never used any lube for the cutting surfaces of my bits or blades so I can't answer that question.

I have only ever used a lubricant on bits that use bearings, such as flush trim bits, pattern bits, etc. I would just suggest cleaning them after every use and learning how to sharpen them or have them sharpened professionally. Most of the cheaper price bits probably aren't worth that though.

 

Richard

Hi Ken - I'm with Richard, I haven't been using any lube on the cutting surfaces. I don't think much is gonna stand up to the cutting process anyway. The dry lube may have some merit in reducing sap or resin buildup around the cutter. Or, at least make it easier to remove. I haven't tried it, just a thought that occurred to me reading this. 

Ken Darga said:

John,

Thanks for the heads-up, re the material getting ''slung'' all over the shop.

(I discontinued using it---15 minutes ago).

re using ''silicon---I read it somewhere in one of those forums re router bits''.

http://www.routerforums.com/router-bits-types-usage/11241-proper-ro...

 

http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/prodinfo.asp?number=BBLUB-2OZ

http://www.talkshopbot.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2034

http://www.emisupply.com/catalog/sprayway-sp295-woodworkers-dry-lub...

 

How about the ''dry-lube'' variety?

When applied, the carrier evaporates and leaves a thin whitish film.

I use the dry-lube on my firearms, as well as many other uses---appling only a small amount---just a thin film, does the job.

A wetted surface attracts and holds dust, which is unacceptable for many uses.

 

http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip38.html

 

http://www.empiremfg.com/products/otc/rbl/index.html

 

hey guys, i know you can sharpen bits, but remember when you sharpen a bit you will change the dimension of the bit, i know it will be a small amount but in the long run it may be a huge amount, just something to keep in mind. i have never lubricated any of my bits, i would only clean them with some compressed air to remove any dust and go on. all my bits work great with no real cleaning or lube. i use woodcraft bits mainly and some mcls. i will start using sommerfeld bits from the reviews i have read, they are eceptional bits. like everything everone has thier own opinion, just hope these thoughts help you all.
router bits hmm. well don't use ryobi oldham or genarics off ebay lol. the fore mentioned bits wear out  quickly and provide sloppy fitment .speed of bit and quantity you are trying to remove play a large part of performance. as to which router bits to use .i'm not sure, cmt is unaffordable but i've been looking at eagle america.who else makes a decent bit?

Looking at eagle america you're still not to far off the price point of Whiteside or CMT. I've had good luck with the house brands of MLCS, Peachtree (Stone Mountain) and Woodcraft (Wood River). I especially watch for Woodcraft clearance sales, many bits go for about $5 - $10 and if you hit it right you can get free shipping over $25. Don't dismiss eBay completely. I've had good luck with Super Carbide Tools, Yonico, Cripe distributing and Heleta Industries. All eBay vendors and Cripe and Heleta also have their own websites.

I like Amana bits, from ToolsToday. com, the best but they are also a "premium" but, price comparable to Whiteside and CMT. Another site I haven't tried but looks interesting is Magnate. Google that one.

patrick in memphis said:

router bits hmm. well don't use ryobi oldham or genarics off ebay lol. the fore mentioned bits wear out  quickly and provide sloppy fitment .speed of bit and quantity you are trying to remove play a large part of performance. as to which router bits to use .i'm not sure, cmt is unaffordable but i've been looking at eagle america.who else makes a decent bit?

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