Kreg Owners' Community

I am a beginner woodworker. Doing great so far. I am currently looking for a router. Now I need to learn to use one. What would be the best way to do this? Any info is appreciated.

Views: 3585

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

hi teresa in usa you have woodcraft stores and you can get hands on , they will help you if somebody mention this aslready i think its good advice good luck you can do it ciao

I am having trouble using the link to the pdf book. Anyone else having trouble?

John,

My experiences with PC routers, is the plunge router base differs with each size router.

Review the router specs, the router model and find the associated base model number for the specific motor model, you are reviewing.

I have the 690 and 890 series---

690 and 890 are the motor models.

Each motor/size has its own plunge base---

and not interchangeable.

The motor sizes differ---

the 690 is 1-3/4hp---

the 890 is 2-1/4hp.

The 890 has a larger diameter motor housing.

the plunge base design of each is different.

Peruse PC website---

review each model---

compare the specs and data.

Hi John - I guess Ken answered your question but the bases are available seperately. The bad new is they run about $100 new. Available on Amazon and Woodcraft to name a couple of sources. That said, there are a lot of the things out there. You may find one on Craigs list or eBay... maybe even one with a bad motor for parts only.

john lucier said:

I am a woodworker and I have been off and on over the years and now since being retired I love the times of getting up early and heading out in the cold garage to throw the heat on to start up my projects. I am having a stumper and I cannot seem to get any answers. Does anyone know if you can use an 8931 porter cable plunge base with a 6901 motor? I have sent letters out to Wood Magazine and to Porter Cable and I have yet to get an answer on this.

I Am looking to purchase a new plunge base to add to my d-handle and this old base I have from 14 years ago. How time flys.. Be real pleased if someone can help me here...Thanks guys...John Lucier

Opened here. You do have  Adobe  reader installed dont you

Teresa Walker said:

I am having trouble using the link to the pdf book. Anyone else having trouble?

Hi John - If you end up needing to buy a new base, may I suggest this alternative for about the same money:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00927683000P?prdNo=2&b...

 

A little more power than the 690, has both bases, variable speed and work lights. Another plus is it is already set up for table use should you want to do that. Also, had an old woodworker tell me that you can't have enough routers.  Could be true, I'm up to eight from just one 2 years ago.                         

john lucier said:

Thanks so much John. The information is most helpful and like you said on Craigs list of which I never thought off.. This is helpful; as well. Thank You never thought of that. They are expensive....Your friend John Lucier..

John Schaben said:

Hi John - I guess Ken answered your question but the bases are available seperately. The bad new is they run about $100 new. Available on Amazon and Woodcraft to name a couple of sources. That said, there are a lot of the things out there. You may find one on Craigs list or eBay... maybe even one with a bad motor for parts only.

john lucier said:

I am a woodworker and I have been off and on over the years and now since being retired I love the times of getting up early and heading out in the cold garage to throw the heat on to start up my projects. I am having a stumper and I cannot seem to get any answers. Does anyone know if you can use an 8931 porter cable plunge base with a 6901 motor? I have sent letters out to Wood Magazine and to Porter Cable and I have yet to get an answer on this.

I Am looking to purchase a new plunge base to add to my d-handle and this old base I have from 14 years ago. How time flys.. Be real pleased if someone can help me here...Thanks guys...John Lucier

john lucier,

I've got several routers in my small shop---fixed base models, plunge base models and trim routers, and use them hand-held as well as in router tables.

Here's my recommendations---(based on my personal observations and experiences).

If only planning to route small size pieces---the Bosch Colt palm router, accommodates 1/4" shank bits, and is variable speed.  Various accessories are available for this unit, as well as a palm router table.  PC offers a trim router, that is very nice, but it only features single-speed.

Purchase the PC 690, a fixed base router, if you don't need the plunge base.  A plunge base is available as an add-on option.  This model is single speed and features chucks for 1/4 and 1/2" shank bits.  This is suitable for cutter bits up to 1'' diameter.  The 690 can be used/connected to an auxiliary speed control device, for about $35.

A slower speed is necessary for spinning the larger bits/cutters.

Purchase the PC 893 Kit---which includes a fixed base and plunge base.  This model is 2-1/4 hp rated.

It features chucks for 1/4 & 1/2" shank bits.  It's a variable speed model.  Purchasing this model kit, the most economical investment, will give you the most bang for you bucks.

1/4'' shank bits are most suitable for machining, using the smaller cutting bits.

The 1/2'' shank bits are more ideally suited for larger bits.

 

I use my 890 fixed base in one of my router tables and use the plunge base for hand operations.This model will handle larger cutter bits of up to 3'' dia---however, it must be run at the low rpms.

NOTE: NEVER run the larger dia bits at the high rpms---therefore the primary reason for having a variable speed model.

It's very easy to remove the unit from the fixed base to the plunge base---a more efficient approach for small shop operations.

The plunge base is most useful for so many applications.

 

If you plan to make machined pieces, requiring the frequent use of the large dia cutters, then look at a larger router with a at least a 3hp rating and with variable speed.  This is much a bigger and heavier unit---recommended  for use in a table router.

 Mount it in the router table and keep it there, and obtain a smaller 1 to 1-1/2 hp model for machine smaller objects.

PC routers have more readily available accessories, and easier to obtain.

Many of the accessories, are interchangeable among the PC routers. 

Many accessories are interchangeable with the 690 and 890 series routers---not so with some other brands.

Thus my #1 choice for the PC routers.

I love my Bosch Colt palm router---it gets lots of use.

Also, several accessories are available for this model, including various bases---it can be used in a palm router table, currently offered by Rockler---(check it out).

(Many CNC machines are equipped with this router.  I've heard of one shop having 6 of these palm routers on their CNC machines, that get daily use).

There are other brand routers on today's market, that are preferred by some, and each has their benefits. 

Explore the features each OEM offers on their routers---compare the features that each model offers---

evaluate the pros and cons.

Does the tool have readily accessible adjustments?

Is the on-off switch easily accessible? 

Evaluate the OEM's service policy and availability of service and parts.

What accessories do they offer?

Examine interchangeability.

Visit your tools centers and peruse the various models and their features.

Select a model/models that are most comfortable for you---it has to feel good to you.

Just like sitting in the drivers seat of an automobile---it's got to feel good to you---access to the controls---are you comfortable with it?

Evaluate the gripping on the tool(s)---it had to fit your hand comfortably---bare handed or with gloves.

(Sometimes I've had to operate my router with gloves, during cold weather, or some thin fitting soft grip gloves to obtain a firm grip.  Some plastics are slippery, and can be very dangerous.  Your need to have a firm grip, and most of all---use ''two hands''.  

A router can be very dangerous---you need to have both hands on the controls.

Shut the power ""OFF'', wait for the bit/cutter to stop spinning, before removing it from the work.

That spinning bit can cause some serious and permanent damage.

DO NOT use the router spinning tool around loose fitting clothing.

The spinning bit can grab your shirt/jacket/arm sleeve, and go right into your body--it can do more damage than a speeding bullet. 

Always wear safety glasses---and in some cases, a face shield is necessary.

If you don't have time to make the perusals and evaluations yourself, then trust an experienced hands-on individual.

Have fun in your wood working adventures.

 

PS---on occasions, for some operations, I plug my router into a ''foot controlled switch''---

so as to keep both hands on the tool, and turn the power ''on & off'', using the foot switch.

Lift my foot from the switch, the switch circuit ''opens'', which interrupts power to the tool, 

wait for the bit/cutter to stop turning, before lifting the tool from the work piece---

while keeping both hands on the tools, 'til the operation is complete.

Then turn the tool power switch to "OFF", before placing the router on the work table.

A handy tool for some machining operations.

Buying from ebay or craigs list---

Keep in mind:

_return policy

_repairs

_warranty

_service

OEM's will not do warranty repairs without product registration or proof of purchase.

Out-of-warranty repairs can cost nearly as much as a new tool.

A number of years ago I purchased a Porter-Cable 690 combo (meaning it comes with both a fixed and plunge base).  It is a 1-1/2 hp router and has been quite adequate for what I use it for.

I agree with the comments above.  Go to a "big box" store and touch and feel the products - but do not necessarily buy from there.  Usually when I purchase a power tool (but not all the time) I will purchase a factory reconditioned tool.  Not only do you get the manufactures warranty buy you also save a bundle of money.  Although I have purchased power tools from a number of on-line retailers - for the last two years I have usually purchased from http://www.toolking.com .

Here is a really good router combo kit.  It is reconditioned and is only $206.00.   http://www.toolking.com/porter-cable-893pk-factory-reconditioned-mu... .  Personally, you would not go wrong with this.  It will take 1/2" shank router bits which is a much better bit (i.e. less likely of breaking) than a 1/4" bit.

As much as I would like a Bosch Colt - or comparable - router someday....I am not sure if I would make this router my first one....but then that is me.

Let us know what you finally decided on doing....and do not be intimidated.

Another thing, be careful when removing a bit from your router. 

This happened to me once and never again....I was going to remove a straight bit so I loosened chuck and grabbed bit with my forefinger and thumb .  Bit was stuck and therefore did not move and the razor sharp edges on bit sliced my thumb and forefinger nicely.

That was on my 1975 Black & Decker model 7610 so the chuck apparatus probably isn't as smooth as when new.  I have 3 other Craftsman routers but for hand-held routing that Black & Decker is my go to machine.

I gotta check out those palm routers you guys are talking about. 

Googled the Bosch Colt Palm Router and watched a tool review video of it by C. J. Walker.  Appears to be a nice smaller router perfect for smaller jobs.  I cringed though when I saw him removing that straight bit with his fingers.  That's exactly how I did it except my bit didn't move but my fingers did.

I see on my local Menards website they have them for $98 or thereabouts.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Pantry slides for heavy application

  Recently purchased two 96" tall pantry cabinets that are 23" deep that only came with two adjustable shelves and two fixed, (one at about 55" and one at the very bottom).  Shelf holes in the walls are drilled 2" O.C.  Like most store-bought…Continue

Tags: drawer, slides, pantry, pull-out, 75-Lb

Started by Paul Coon in General Woodworking Aug 11.

Miter Saw Recommendation 1 Reply

I’m looking to upgrade my miter saw. I’m willing to invest a good amount of money to get one with the precision pocket hole joinery requires. Would anyone like to offer a recommended model?

Started by Joe Racz in Beginners' Zone. Last reply by Scott Davison Oct 6.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 8 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_