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Hi Guys
I'm new to the Kreg Jig usage but I started a new TV cabinet last week and things are going awesome!! It is working just like they say in the demos and it is easy to use too.

So now I have got the hole plugs glued in, I'm wondering how I'm going to cut off the excess plug stock. I have seen videos of using a router but what if you are trying to trim off the plugs on an inside corner?

Well after scratching my head and trying a few things, here is what I came up with. My wife got me a new Dremel tool and kit for Christmas last year. In the kit was an attachment for cutting circles in drywall. It is a cone shaped piece that attaches to an arm along with a spiral bit. The spiral bit has a FLAT bottom on it. SO.... I screwed the cone shaped piece along with the depth setting piece onto the Dremel, trimmed the base so I could get up close to the side of my cabinet and set the depth to about 1/32 above the base material and "wa la" I have a mini plug trimmer. I have it set close enough to the base material that a light sanding is all I need to finish the plug to match the base. I have attached a picture of the setup.
Enjoy

I have just included a closeup picture of my mini router so that you can get a better look at how I was using it. It takes about 20 to 30 seconds per plug.

***NOTE*** make sure you hold the Dremel tool tightly against the base wood!! As you run the bit through the plug it does want to jump if not held tightly against the base wood. I just finished trimming 25 pluges in about 10minutes. With a little sanding , I am done.

John Frankforther

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Nice work! I wish I would have thought of this before I just smoked through a ton of sand paper sheets!
Great solution, John. There's a bit more information on this topic... here: http://kregjig.ning.com/forum/topics/kreg-plugs-that-dont-fit
you could also use a flush cut saw that cuts on the pull not the push. I saw video useing a dowel in the pocket hole and the same saw the saw is 20 bucks and dowels are a 25 cents for 3 feet.not a bad way to go.
I just cut off 20 plugs with my flushcut saw. Worked great. Not as quick as your dremel but it did get the job done.
Mike
Alot of good ideas. I've always used my router. For corners I've used chisels. However, I just built an 8 foot media center and had many plugs to use. My plan was to use milk paint and some accent staining on the edges so the plugs wouldn't be visible regardless. Instead of using the plugs, I just used woodfiller glue. One quick scrape and a quick sanding after the glue dried, finished. If your staining, then this won't work. But if painting, will save you lots of time.
I found this forum interesting because I have a project that requires plugs. I recently cut 15 oak plugs from the inside of a craftsman style bookcase. I figured I'd try the cheapest method and work up till I found one that is acceptable. So, I started with a Japanese style pull cut saw. I found this one online:

http://thejapanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_...

It indicated there is there is no scratching of your work and at $24 it is a good starting point.

"Wooden Nail Saws are used to trim wooden nails and plugs flush with the surface of your work. The blade is thin and flexible, so when in use, it can be bent with a portion of the blade held flat against the work surface. The teeth have little or no set to avoid scratching your work. These saws are also great for cutting a fine kerf in small work. Blade length is 6; overall length is 13 with 19 tpi. The handle is make from African Rosewood with brass attachment screws. The blade can be easily replaced if necessary."

It worked absolutely wonderful! There was absolutely no scratching of the surrounding area and it cut clean and flush to the surrounding area requiring no sanding because of marks (I did sand just because though). It took only a few minutes to cut the 15 oak plugs. I actually was able to cut 2 plugs at a time because of the layout. You just place the saw blade under the little overhang and pull (much better than a push cut). In the words of Mike Meyer - "like butter".
HI Don

I have seen those type of saws at the Woodcraft store with a similar price. I may have to try one on my next project.
Thanks for sharing!!

John

Don Husslein said:
I found this forum interesting because I have a project that requires plugs. I recently cut 15 oak plugs from the inside of a craftsman style bookcase. I figured I'd try the cheapest method and work up till I found one that is acceptable. So, I started with a Japanese style pull cut saw. I found this one online:

http://thejapanwoodworker.com/product.asp?s=JapanWoodworker&pf_...

It indicated there is there is no scratching of your work and at $24 it is a good starting point.

"Wooden Nail Saws are used to trim wooden nails and plugs flush with the surface of your work. The blade is thin and flexible, so when in use, it can be bent with a portion of the blade held flat against the work surface. The teeth have little or no set to avoid scratching your work. These saws are also great for cutting a fine kerf in small work. Blade length is 6; overall length is 13 with 19 tpi. The handle is make from African Rosewood with brass attachment screws. The blade can be easily replaced if necessary."

It worked absolutely wonderful! There was absolutely no scratching of the surrounding area and it cut clean and flush to the surrounding area requiring no sanding because of marks (I did sand just because though). It took only a few minutes to cut the 15 oak plugs. I actually was able to cut 2 plugs at a time because of the layout. You just place the saw blade under the little overhang and pull (much better than a push cut). In the words of Mike Meyer - "like butter".
Not the best idea What you might try next time is use you power sander and sand them down After all you have to sand it anyway
Also to if you set your drill stop just a little higher on shank you get it deeper for a lower fit on plug

Kreg needs to come up with a solution. I've found trimming the plugs could be dangerous if cut prior to installation with anything power tool. And once in, makes it difficult to not mar the finished work.

Mike,

Trimming the plugs, without marring the surface, is a user issue---

not a Kreg problem.

Insert the plugs and cut them flush after the plugs are installed.

I'd discourage the use of a chain saw, or the like---reserve that for cutting trees or firewood.

There are several acceptable means that can be employed, using hand tools and power tools.

#1---a flush cutting type blade is needed.

Use a slow speed and feed.

A flush-cutting hand saw is the preferred tool, for those not intimate with power tools.

Appling some masking tape around the protruding plug, cut flush, emove tape and sand flush.

A power router with an appropriate bit can also be used.

A hand plane can also be used successfully.

Make some practice cuts in scrap wood, to get a feel for what you want to accomplish.

Learn as you go.

 

michael daniels said:

Kreg needs to come up with a solution. I've found trimming the plugs could be dangerous if cut prior to installation with anything power tool. And once in, makes it difficult to not mar the finished work.

Plugs can also be made flush by using a chisel, employing a shaving action.

A chisel with a rounded end will work better than a squared end chisel.

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