Kreg Owners' Community

Hello Folks I would like to build a Garden Tool Storage rack for my shop to fit in a corner. I have a few thoughts but I was hoping to get a few ideas from the Kreg Community. Can anyone help out. All suggestions are welcome. Thanks 

Best Regards,

Wayne Breaux

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Wayne,

The following comments are offered.

1st.  make a list of what tools to want to store in your intended rack.

2. Determine where you want to store the applicable tools.

 (I'd suggest locating this storage rack near the door, for easy access to the tools).

Small tools can be placed on a shelf or in a cubby hole.

Cubby holes/dividers can be the quantity desired, to facilitate the tools.

Divider spacing and size to be determined by the size of the tool.

Small tools can be stored in an empty milk crate or 3-5 gal plastic bucket---

place the container on a shelf with the open end facing or open end up.  If you place the container, with the open end up, you may have to take it off the shelf to access the tools.

Smaller size container(s) with carrying handle can suffice such that you can take the container of stored tools to the work-site.

Long handle tools:

Can be stored with handle down (hanging), or

tool end down so that the mass of the weight is resting on a base.

I'd suggest tool end "down", which putts the heavier end down.

If the heavier end is "UP", there is the potential for the tool becoming dislodged, falling down, hitting someone or damaging something nearby.

Ex: a rake with teeth, if it falls off the hanger, it could result in serious injury to persons(s)---

such as small children.  This would also apply to shovel(s), garden hoe, and the like.

A storage container, is an optional way to go.

A larger size suitable container can be made mobile---ie, equipped with casters, for mobility.

Depth of 18-24".

Wide of the storage container, to accommodate the tools you intend to store here.

Partitions can be featured---orientated vertically, to accommodate applicable tools, such as shovels, and the like, with the heavy end "down", resting on the base of the unit.

Dowels, 1" dia, can be positioned horizontally, one closer to the bottom and another at a higher elevation so as to keep the tool handles separated---helps prevent them from tangling with each other.  

Plan for short and long handle tools.

Short handle tools, such as a shovel with a "D" handle, can be hung from a peg, or the like.

Metal tool holders, can be located on the back wall the storage area, to hang tools.

(Metal tool holders/hangers can be obtained from a home center).

When I only had a few outdoor tools, I stored them in my garage, on hangers, such as shovels, rakes, etc.

Hand tools were stored a milk crate and the crate placed on a shelf above the long handle tools.

As my supply of tools increased, I build a separate outdoor tool shed---6x6x6 ft.

Long handle tools, shovels, rakes and the like,  stored on the interior side walls.

Shelves across the back wall, with heavier objects on the lower shelf and smaller lighter objects on the upper shelves.

Other yard equipment, such as sprayers, and the like, stored in 5 gal plastic buckets.

PS---when storing the yard/garden tools, keep them as close to a wall as possible.

(Bungee cords can be used to keep the tools in place, when stored).

You don't want anything sticking out, to reduce the risk of someone running into them and the tool become dislodged from it stored location, and cause injury to person(s).

When storing poisonous materials, such as weed killers, insect sprays, liquids, and the like,

store them in a crate, bucket, or the like, HIGH on a shelf, so the wee ones can't easily get to them.

Have fun planning and building this project.



Ken Darga said:

Wayne,

The following comments are offered.

1st.  make a list of what tools to want to store in your intended rack.

2. Determine where you want to store the applicable tools.

 (I'd suggest locating this storage rack near the door, for easy access to the tools).

Small tools can be placed on a shelf or in a cubby hole.

Cubby holes/dividers can be the quantity desired, to facilitate the tools.

Divider spacing and size to be determined by the size of the tool.

Small tools can be stored in an empty milk crate or 3-5 gal plastic bucket---

place the container on a shelf with the open end facing or open end up.  If you place the container, with the open end up, you may have to take it off the shelf to access the tools.

Smaller size container(s) with carrying handle can suffice such that you can take the container of stored tools to the work-site.

Long handle tools:

Can be stored with handle down (hanging), or

tool end down so that the mass of the weight is resting on a base.

I'd suggest tool end "down", which putts the heavier end down.

If the heavier end is "UP", there is the potential for the tool becoming dislodged, falling down, hitting someone or damaging something nearby.

Ex: a rake with teeth, if it falls off the hanger, it could result in serious injury to persons(s)---

such as small children.  This would also apply to shovel(s), garden hoe, and the like.

A storage container, is an optional way to go.

A larger size suitable container can be made mobile---ie, equipped with casters, for mobility.

Depth of 18-24".

Wide of the storage container, to accommodate the tools you intend to store here.

Partitions can be featured---orientated vertically, to accommodate applicable tools, such as shovels, and the like, with the heavy end "down", resting on the base of the unit.

Dowels, 1" dia, can be positioned horizontally, one closer to the bottom and another at a higher elevation so as to keep the tool handles separated---helps prevent them from tangling with each other.  

Plan for short and long handle tools.

Short handle tools, such as a shovel with a "D" handle, can be hung from a peg, or the like.

Metal tool holders, can be located on the back wall the storage area, to hang tools.

(Metal tool holders/hangers can be obtained from a home center).

When I only had a few outdoor tools, I stored them in my garage, on hangers, such as shovels, rakes, etc.

Hand tools were stored a milk crate and the crate placed on a shelf above the long handle tools.

As my supply of tools increased, I build a separate outdoor tool shed---6x6x6 ft.

Long handle tools, shovels, rakes and the like,  stored on the interior side walls.

Shelves across the back wall, with heavier objects on the lower shelf and smaller lighter objects on the upper shelves.

Other yard equipment, such as sprayers, and the like, stored in 5 gal plastic buckets.

PS---when storing the yard/garden tools, keep them as close to a wall as possible.

(Bungee cords can be used to keep the tools in place, when stored).

You don't want anything sticking out, to reduce the risk of someone running into them and the tool become dislodged from it stored location, and cause injury to person(s).

When storing poisonous materials, such as weed killers, insect sprays, liquids, and the like,

store them in a crate, bucket, or the like, HIGH on a shelf, so the wee ones can't easily get to them.

Have fun planning and building this project.



Ken Darga said:

Wayne,

The following comments are offered.

1st.  make a list of what tools to want to store in your intended rack.

2. Determine where you want to store the applicable tools.

 (I'd suggest locating this storage rack near the door, for easy access to the tools).

Small tools can be placed on a shelf or in a cubby hole.

Cubby holes/dividers can be the quantity desired, to facilitate the tools.

Divider spacing and size to be determined by the size of the tool.

Small tools can be stored in an empty milk crate or 3-5 gal plastic bucket---

place the container on a shelf with the open end facing or open end up.  If you place the container, with the open end up, you may have to take it off the shelf to access the tools.

Smaller size container(s) with carrying handle can suffice such that you can take the container of stored tools to the work-site.

Long handle tools:

Can be stored with handle down (hanging), or

tool end down so that the mass of the weight is resting on a base.

I'd suggest tool end "down", which putts the heavier end down.

If the heavier end is "UP", there is the potential for the tool becoming dislodged, falling down, hitting someone or damaging something nearby.

Ex: a rake with teeth, if it falls off the hanger, it could result in serious injury to persons(s)---

such as small children.  This would also apply to shovel(s), garden hoe, and the like.

A storage container, is an optional way to go.

A larger size suitable container can be made mobile---ie, equipped with casters, for mobility.

Depth of 18-24".

Wide of the storage container, to accommodate the tools you intend to store here.

Partitions can be featured---orientated vertically, to accommodate applicable tools, such as shovels, and the like, with the heavy end "down", resting on the base of the unit.

Dowels, 1" dia, can be positioned horizontally, one closer to the bottom and another at a higher elevation so as to keep the tool handles separated---helps prevent them from tangling with each other.  

Plan for short and long handle tools.

Short handle tools, such as a shovel with a "D" handle, can be hung from a peg, or the like.

Metal tool holders, can be located on the back wall the storage area, to hang tools.

(Metal tool holders/hangers can be obtained from a home center).

When I only had a few outdoor tools, I stored them in my garage, on hangers, such as shovels, rakes, etc.

Hand tools were stored a milk crate and the crate placed on a shelf above the long handle tools.

As my supply of tools increased, I build a separate outdoor tool shed---6x6x6 ft.

Long handle tools, shovels, rakes and the like,  stored on the interior side walls.

Shelves across the back wall, with heavier objects on the lower shelf and smaller lighter objects on the upper shelves.

Other yard equipment, such as sprayers, and the like, stored in 5 gal plastic buckets.

PS---when storing the yard/garden tools, keep them as close to a wall as possible.

(Bungee cords can be used to keep the tools in place, when stored).

You don't want anything sticking out, to reduce the risk of someone running into them and the tool become dislodged from it stored location, and cause injury to person(s).

When storing poisonous materials, such as weed killers, insect sprays, liquids, and the like,

store them in a crate, bucket, or the like, HIGH on a shelf, so the wee ones can't easily get to them.

Have fun planning and building this project.

H ello Ken thanks for all the great info. I appreciate you putting alot of thought into my hopes of creating the proper mobile rack to satisfy my needs, it almost seems you have been in my shop or you have one simular. I slowly in the process of trying to get organized but it's a work in progress. There's always something that seems a little more important & this kept getting pushed aside. But I think the time is now. I will try to keep you posted on any progress. Thanks again

Best Regards,

Wayne Breaux

Wayne,

And your question is... ??? 



Ken Darga said:

Wayne,

And your question is... ??? 

No questions were good I new to this format I may not be using it in the right way . Thanks again for the suggestions.

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