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I'm looking to replace my ryobi router. It does ok for light routing, but i want a router with a little more power. I have been looking at Ridgid and porter Cable. Any suggestions on what brands to look at or stay away from?

thanks

Derrick Williams

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while on the subject routers/bits...in the last two weeks i began using a "kreg" benchtop router table with a p/c 892 router...with a brand new 1/4 inch roman ogee bit making very light passes i've noticed "burning" on a couple oak and even pine pieces i've processed...i was surprised as i thought the 892 had plenty of power for light edging ?????   set @ max rpm and feed very slowly ????? any clues out there...thanks...gary 

Derrick,

I have an Australian made TRITON router they have been voted the best in the world. You can buy them in the USA. You will need to Google TRITON and check out where you can buy one. Try a tool shop in your area.

Regards

Gary

From the land down under.

Hi Gary - you just answered your own question

 "set @ max rpm and feed very slowly ????? any clues out there...thanks...gary"

Hi rpm + slow feed = heat. Either cut the rpm's or increase the feed rate. Router is just fine.

Gary Hannon said:

while on the subject routers/bits...in the last two weeks i began using a "kreg" benchtop router table with a p/c 892 router...with a brand new 1/4 inch roman ogee bit making very light passes i've noticed "burning" on a couple oak and even pine pieces i've processed...i was surprised as i thought the 892 had plenty of power for light edging ?????   set @ max rpm and feed very slowly ????? any clues out there...thanks...gary 

Hi Marc - problem with magazine ratings is I'm never sure how advertising revenue fits into the test equation. Whiteside are very good, very expensive bits. For bits used a lot of the time I will spring for the higher dollar bits; Amana, EagleAmerica, Whiteside, CMT. Of those, I have had the best luck with the Amana. For lower usage bits don't overlook the house brands. I've had excellant results with MLCS, Wood River (Woodcraft), Stone Mountain (Peachtree), Rockler, and a couple of eBay vendors; Super Carbide Tools and Yonico. Go with high end bits for the straight and roundovers as you will use those on just about every project.

Marc DeCastro said:
As for router bits, I suggest you look at finewoodworking.com.  They conducted tests on a bunch of bits and results showed Whiteside and Eagle as the best performers.  I've been using Whiteside bits and after searching the web for good prices, I setteled on woodworkersworld.net.  It's a small company in PA and they deliver quickly; 2-3 days.  Whiteside bits are made in the USA and they have a tech support line that is actually at the factory and the guy I spoke with actually does woodwork.  Just don't call on Monday morning.
hey john...thanks so much for taking the time to respond...i guess my "non-thought" process was to achieve the smoothest results that higher speed was appropriate....didn't give any thought as to how a hot bit hanging around the stock too long might adversely affect the results...duh...i'll experiment with both speed and rate of feed...once again...thanks for sharing your expertise....gary

John Schaben said:

Hi Gary - you just answered your own question

 "set @ max rpm and feed very slowly ????? any clues out there...thanks...gary"

Hi rpm + slow feed = heat. Either cut the rpm's or increase the feed rate. Router is just fine.

Gary Hannon said:

while on the subject routers/bits...in the last two weeks i began using a "kreg" benchtop router table with a p/c 892 router...with a brand new 1/4 inch roman ogee bit making very light passes i've noticed "burning" on a couple oak and even pine pieces i've processed...i was surprised as i thought the 892 had plenty of power for light edging ?????   set @ max rpm and feed very slowly ????? any clues out there...thanks...gary 

Dave here from South Africa. Go for the top rated router (American Wood work Mag) "Triton 2400w (3 1/4hp) 1/2'' router. I us one and nothing stops it.


Dave Whittington said:
Dave here from South Africa. Go for the top rated router (American Wood work Mag) "Triton 2400w (3 1/4hp) 1/2'' router. I us one and nothing stops it.

To prevent router bit burn marks on wood, make shallower depth cuts and passes--- try to keep a steady feed rate.

Ex: 1/16" deep by 1/4 - 1/2" height of cut, followed by incremental adjustments in height and depth of cuts, 'til the final result is achieved.

Practicing on scrap pieces, will be helpful, before moving on to your final project.

 

It takes practice, using a router---practice on scrap wood pieces---once to get the hang of it, it'll be a lot easier to achieve finished results a lot quicker.

 

''Feed and speed'' is key.

 

Lower rpm's are necessary when using larger dia bits.

Use only larger dia bits ONLY in a router table.

 

Coat the router base plate with Min-Wax furniture paste wax, or equiv--- resulting in decreased friction, between the router base plate and the wood surface.

 

A router could be one of the handiest tools you have in your shop.

 

I started out with a Craftsman 1/4" shank size---very nice for small bits and cutting operations.

This model has a micrometer height adjustment and light that illuminates the cutting bit area, a various accessories.

Then added a PC 690 with fixed base, then a palm router for doing edge trimming,

then followed by a PC 890 with fixed base affixed in a router table and use the plunge base for other tasks.

A plunge router is a big plus, for many tasks.

 

I have a 2nd palm router, a Bosch Colt---1/4" size shank bits ---this model has a variable speed adjustment, that is useful, easy to use---easy bit height adjustment right at your finger tips. 

 

The Bosch palm router is an excellent choice for a first time router purchase.  

Small, compact, light weight, and many nice features.

I use it for almost all of my smaller cutting operations.

Various accessories are available: alternate router bases, bushing guides, etc. for a large selection of uses.

 

Rockler offers a ''palm/trim router table''---excellent for small tasks and portability.

 

 

 

 

 

Agreed!  PC 7518, Whiteside bits, Kreg router table and lift (yes...I'm a fan, lol)...can't beat that combo.

James Moe said:

You won't find a better table mounted router than a PC 7518. If your an avid woodworker and buy anything else, in time you will end up with the PC. As far as handheld and plunge, it really depends on how it feels to you but stay with 2 hp.

Dave, I  informed Derrick earlier about the TRITON router, I don't know if he got the message...I use one its the best in the world. Gary Uhlmann from down under.

Dave Whittington said:
Dave here from South Africa. Go for the top rated router (American Wood work Mag) "Triton 2400w (3 1/4hp) 1/2'' router. I us one and nothing stops it.
yes sir, i got the message about the Triton router, I am looking at them now. Thanks Guys !

I think I sorta agree with this. The 7518 is indeed a workhorse motor. Designed for industrial applications but an old design. No question about the power but the the design is such that bit height changes are done by rotating the entire motor in the base which in turn winds the power cord around and changes the position of the power switch and speed control for each height setting. This particular design shortfall virtually requires the use of a lift. Given that the motor itself is  $300+/- and a lift will add about $200 +/- you have a fairly pricey startup as you haven't even got the table, fence or bits yet. Adding a Kreg table and a bunch of Whiteside bits you can easily get into the $1000-1200 range.

Viable alternatives would be the Triton TRA001,  Milwaukee 5625 or Freud 3000 all of which have built in lifts and can be had in the $250 -$300 range.

For that matter, I submit that most, especially new users, do not need a big dog router. The majority of the work can be done quite satisfactorily with a 2 +/- HP machine.

If one has an unlimited budget, great, I'm happy for you. Me, on fixed income retirement, I need to pinch pennies until Abe yells "uncle".



steven kemp said:

Agreed!  PC 7518, Whiteside bits, Kreg router table and lift (yes...I'm a fan, lol)...can't beat that combo.

James Moe said:

You won't find a better table mounted router than a PC 7518. If your an avid woodworker and buy anything else, in time you will end up with the PC. As far as handheld and plunge, it really depends on how it feels to you but stay with 2 hp.

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