Kreg Owners' Community

Built with professionals and hobbyists in mind, the Kreg Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine is packed with features that will have you building with twice the speed and half the effort of a standard pocket-hole jig. 


With the all-new Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine, creating perfect pocket holes is extremely fast and easy. Simply pull the large control handle to start the powerful 110-volt motor, clamp your workpiece securely in place, and raise the drill bit through the table. This simple operation drills a precisely-placed pocket hole at the perfect depth in materials from 1/2"- to 1-1/2"-thick, while built-in dust collection keeps your work area clean as you work.


To ensure perfect pocket-hole placement, the Foreman features an adjustable fence that positions your workpiece for precise pocket depth, and pair of adjustable, spring-loaded stops that provide repeatable accuracy. Markings in the rigid, cast-aluminum table make it easy to position the fence for the three most commonly used material thicknesses: 1/2", 3/4", and 1-1/2".

Light-but-durable construction makes the Foreman perfect for use in the shop, around the home, and on the go. This hardworking machine weighs just 20 pounds and has a lockable handle for safe and easy transport. Even with this portability, the Foreman still features a large table to hold big boards and support pieces made from sheet goods. The table flips up to allow easy access to the motor and quick-change drill chuck, plus a built-in storage tray that keeps extra bits and accessories organized and within close reach.

On top of all of these great features, the Foreman is the first pocket-hole machine that creates all three Kreg Joint™ sizes: Standard, Micro-Pocket™, and HD (Heavy-Duty). The Foreman comes with the standard bit and drill guide, but you can easily switch to Micro-Pocket™ or HD any time you want to.

The Foreman’s innovative features make it possible for anyone—whether you are a professional woodworker, a hobbyist, a contractor, or a do-it-yourselfer—to create strong, tight-fitting pocket joints with the speed and precision only a Kreg pocket-hole machine can provide. And the Foreman does it at a price that’s easy to afford. Combine it all, and it’s easy to see that the all-new Kreg Foreman is your high-speed solution for pocket-hole construction.

Learn everything you need to know about the new Kreg Foreman HERE.
Retails for $399.99 (U.S.)

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What about the dust collection?

Good question, Michael,

A very important feature with this unit.

A 1-1/4" vac hose inlet is located on the back side of the base section.

A vac is necessary to suck-up the wood chips.

If a vac hose is not used, lots of wood chips accumulate in base section.

The bottom is open, so the wood chips will accumulate on the surface the unit is resting on.

The wood chips can easily be removed, by lifting and tilting one side of the unit, 

and brush out the wood chips.

When lots of holes are drilled, you'll want a vac hooked up to the machine.

On the test unit, I connected the drilling and vac system to an electrical fixture,

so that when the drilling machine was in operation, the vac was ON.

An integral shroud inside the unit directs the wood chips into the vac hose hook-up, 

leaving the interior of the unit nearly sawdust-free.



Michael Garrett said:

What about the dust collection?

Here's a link the to the Foreman DB210 Owners Manual.

https://www.kregtool.com/webres/Files/DB210%20Manual%20for%20Websit...

Just what I needed to know, thanks

It is pretty hard to reach a fair conclusion as to this machine being cheap until you actually see and use the machine.  It was made to make it affordable for everyone to own.  To add steel to the case would have driven the price up.  The important thing is that it does the job for what it was designed for and allows a faster method for doing pocket hole joinery.  The years that I have been using pocket hole joinery should afford me the knowledge that I would know what "Cheap" is, and I do not consider this machine to be cheap. 
 
Jeffrey Pike said:

I think Craig took a real good well-built tool and made it look very very cheap by adding all all that plastic on there
I think the base is very cheap and the handles very cheap and I give it a thumbs down

why isn't it made in the USA?

Perhaps, it can be made less costly in China, 

so it'll sell for $399.

PK said:

why isn't it made in the USA?

The All new Foreman;

After spending the last few days reviewing all other brands and reviewing the original Foreman this is what I have come up with.

The new machine is one of the lightest  half the weight of the original and most portable on the market, great for jobsite and small shop moving and storage.

The new machine is one of the easiest and fastest to setup and change to different thickness of material the original takes a lot more time to change.

The new machine changes drill; bits quicker and without tools, also the new machine accepts HD and Micro drills and guides. The original does not accept HD and Micro.  

The price is the lowest of anyone on the market in comparison I have pelican cases for shipping tools that cost the same. My Freud edge banding machine cost as about as much.

As far as a the material that it is made off lets compare my first Kreg Jig Aluminium heavy and works but not as versatile as my new K5 that is light and lots of plastic.

I believe that Kreg has a winner here and this will be proven with the sales over the first year, I do not think everyone will be buying it but those that do will be happy with it.

My only concern is I did not find out a lot specs about the drill motor I would like to know more about the HP and the torque etc. so I would know that the motor would take the load with out heating up or wearing out.

The only thing I could find is the voltage 110 volts 5 amps 2800 rpm.

I do think this will be a great machine for a small shop or a serious hobbyist it has all the features anyone would want and when it comes to pocket holes I only buy Kreg.

And Jay and Ken have tested it and the are giving it a great review.

When I get to test it or see it I will add some more.

 

Jeff   

The frame looks to be about the same as my Makita Table Saw heavy duty plastic in fact most of the portable contractor saw are made that way the fence aligns square every time. 

kp,

Alignment markings are on the table top, to position the fence for the material thickness being drilled.

The elongated (slotted) holes make for easier, quicker and fine tuning of adjustments.

k p said:

The fence has 2 slots to adjust it. On the video it looks as if you could easily adjust it out of square.

My comment is in regards the unit being made of heavy duty plastic not being a problem in fact common practice on contractor saw my contractor saw aligns square every time . I understand you need align fence to the marks.   

Motor HP

Rating 110V 5A = 550W

1 HP = 740W

therefore 550W = 0.74HP

I don't believe it's nearly a 3/4HP motor.

Perhaps the 5amp rating is the FLA.

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