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help me to buy a planer portable , any one now any shop or store to buy online ? 

 

tks ben

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If you want used, try Craigs List.com  If you want new, you'll have to shop around, and if you've got a store where you can go and put your hands on the machine/s, that may help make your decision. You can find some good deals out there for bench-top models. Even Amazon.com sometimes.  But, my preference is touchin, and feelin.  There are lots of things you can do to help eliminate or reduce snipe, but, unless you pay a ga-zillion bux for a high dollar machine, I think they all have their own problems with it (snipe)
wath do you think of this DEWALT DW734 ???

Ya RMK but thses snipes are on the 10" pace's I can under stand on the 4' and 8 feet one's



RMK said:

If you want used, try Craigs List.com  If you want new, you'll have to shop around, and if you've got a store where you can go and put your hands on the machine/s, that may help make your decision. You can find some good deals out there for bench-top models. Even Amazon.com sometimes.  But, my preference is touchin, and feelin.  There are lots of things you can do to help eliminate or reduce snipe, but, unless you pay a ga-zillion bux for a high dollar machine, I think they all have their own problems with it (snipe)


ben said:
wath do you think of this DEWALT DW734 ???
There are many different bench-top planers out there.
I think this is a nice planer. the infeed/outfeed tables are a bit longer than the Delta, which I think would help minimize snipe a lot.
With that said, the Dewalt has 3 knives, Delta has 2
Dewalt is higher price, probably because of the extra knives, and longer tables
Tool shoppin is fun, and, stressful. You've got to be the one to make the decision
That is my $.02 
Good luck with your search, and your decision. Remember this: no matter what you buy, there may be some "fine-tuning" involved by you.   
What is the American dollar cost not L

ben said:
sory for the bad link ,    this is the link iam not sure for this planer but many people told me is good  , wath do you think ?  http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-axminster-mb1933-portable-thic... 
Just under $500 US

Jens Jensen said:
What is the American dollar cost not L

ben said:
sory for the bad link ,    this is the link iam not sure for this planer but many people told me is good  , wath do you think ?  http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-axminster-mb1933-portable-thic... 

I have the Rigid 13" planer (3 knives) and get the snipe that everyone else gets. When I have a piece that is to short to cut off the end where the snipe is, I add a couple of pieces of scrap to the ends on the side of the work piece that extend the back of the work piece out about 3-4" that way the snipe is on the scrap and not on my work piece. You can do this by gluing the pieces on the sides if you are worried about metal going through your planer, I use an 18 gage brad nailer if the piece is thick enough, or my 22 gage micro pinner if the piece is thin already and just taking off a rough patch.

I have seen people use the Dewalt and not get snipe, and I have also used my Rigid and not gotten snipe, so I would say that if you are just a part time user of a thickness planer I wouldn't spend the big $$ on a commercial type model when the 13" planers available at Home Depot, Lowes or Woodcraft will suit your purposes just as well and you can use the extra $$ for other equipment for your shop.

yep, that is another way to eliminate snipe Dave. I have done that with double-stick tape. I also used, what I call "rails".... it's just 2 longer pieces of wood sandwiching my good wood. That works really well, and I didn't even need to use the double-stick tape when doing that. I just kinda squeezed them together as they went through.

Dave Johnson said:

I have the Rigid 13" planer (3 knives) and get the snipe that everyone else gets. When I have a piece that is to short to cut off the end where the snipe is, I add a couple of pieces of scrap to the ends on the side of the work piece that extend the back of the work piece out about 3-4" that way the snipe is on the scrap and not on my work piece. You can do this by gluing the pieces on the sides if you are worried about metal going through your planer, I use an 18 gage brad nailer if the piece is thick enough, or my 22 gage micro pinner if the piece is thin already and just taking off a rough patch.

I have seen people use the Dewalt and not get snipe, and I have also used my Rigid and not gotten snipe, so I would say that if you are just a part time user of a thickness planer I wouldn't spend the big $$ on a commercial type model when the 13" planers available at Home Depot, Lowes or Woodcraft will suit your purposes just as well and you can use the extra $$ for other equipment for your shop.

Those are both good ways, but for the tape, does that clog up your blade? or do you stick it low enough not to get cut? When I use pins or brad nails, I usually end up needing to use wood putty to fill in the holes mixed with a bit of saw dust from the project to keep the color consistant. And I make real sure that the naisl are at least 1/4" below where the knives would ever go.

Any thing that is that small that I'm working with I will usually use my jointer/planer unless it's over 6" wide, but usually by the time I'm down to that size it's sandpapering time anyway.

I have also been playing around with the way I hold the wood while it enters the planer. I have found that if I put a little down pressure on the back end of the piece going in and a little up pressure as it comes out I have reduced MOST of the snipe.

In my scroll saw club I get these old timers that have been working with wood since Noah and the Ark claim that anyone who gets snipe just doesn't know what they are doing. Some of the old timers also have drum sanders that they prefer to a planer, but a cheap drum sander at almost $1000 is more than I can afford. I have been looking at the sand flea for a drum sander though and have heard some good comments about it.

I use a 12 1/2 Dewalt.  It is set up properly & never results in any snipe.  Blade life is fine & a new set result in the nicest boards.
keep the tape low enough so it doesn't get into the blades for sure. I'd like to have a drum sander myself, but, like you, the wallet won't allow it 

Dave Johnson said:

Those are both good ways, but for the tape, does that clog up your blade? or do you stick it low enough not to get cut? When I use pins or brad nails, I usually end up needing to use wood putty to fill in the holes mixed with a bit of saw dust from the project to keep the color consistant. And I make real sure that the naisl are at least 1/4" below where the knives would ever go.

Any thing that is that small that I'm working with I will usually use my jointer/planer unless it's over 6" wide, but usually by the time I'm down to that size it's sandpapering time anyway.

I have also been playing around with the way I hold the wood while it enters the planer. I have found that if I put a little down pressure on the back end of the piece going in and a little up pressure as it comes out I have reduced MOST of the snipe.

In my scroll saw club I get these old timers that have been working with wood since Noah and the Ark claim that anyone who gets snipe just doesn't know what they are doing. Some of the old timers also have drum sanders that they prefer to a planer, but a cheap drum sander at almost $1000 is more than I can afford. I have been looking at the sand flea for a drum sander though and have heard some good comments about it.

Ben...

I also have a Dewalt Planer (the _35 model) which is the next model up from the one noted in the photo.  I've been very pleased with it - yes, you pay a bit more but it's well worth it, the cost savings in the rough cut vs. s4s lumber will be relized immediately. 

Also regarding the snipe... you can purchase extention tables (which i did for the Dewlat) however, all planers snipe but I found when you lift up ever so slightly on the milled lumber as it exits - it is reduced to a level that can be addressed with 180 grit sandpaper. 

hope this helps
David

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