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What are the options for building drawer boxes using pocket-hole joinery. I've seen pictures of Derek's drawer here: http://kregjig.ning.com/photo/side-and-bottom-of-drawer?context=latest

 

Curious as to whether thats the best option and if there are other ways to construct. Specifically interested in pocket-hole options.

 

Thanks in advance.

Chris

 

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Chris,
I will be following this "thread" closely as my next DIY project is a built-in for a small walk in closet. My wife wanted drawers, rather than shelves or bins. The top half of the built-in will have a pull down clothes rack, and the bottom half will have 6 drawers. I ordered some supplies from "McFeely's" (which is an awesome web site) yesterday and I ordered the very book that Phillip referenced. The book was $5.
Good luck and keep us up to date with the progress.

Steve
Phillip said:
In my Kreg Master kit were 2 books. The first is Basic Cabinetmaking by Mark Duginske. On pages 30 through 34 are directions for drawer construction using the Kreg system. If you ask Kreg they may give you the book or a copy of the pages. The difference between what Derek posted and the drawer in the book, is 4 pocket screws in the back panel and 4 in the front panel. The back holes are out of view in the back of the drawer turned away from view, and the front holes are covered by the front panel. Using tracks (your choice of style) makes the process fast and easy. The bottom is held in place by a groove (dado running with the grain) that holds the 1/4" or 1/8" thick bottom plywood or hardboard in. The drawer that Derek made is the exact drawer that you want for heavy tools or workshop drawer. I know nothing about how or why Derek built the drawer the way he did so I am reluctant to even guess, more than that is the way he wanted it.
Phil



Phillip, thanks for your comments. Just an FYI... as you can see in the photos Chris linked, the "F" on the top of that image indicates the front of the drawer. I put pocket holes on the front and on the back. Like you said, the ones on the back are hidden (obviously) and the ones on the front will be hidden by the drawer's false front (I did the exact same thing with my Cherry iMac Desk, which you can see detailed photos of here)


On the iMac desk, I built the three front drawers - as you said - with a 1/4" panel held in place by a dado.


For the back drawer (hidden drawer) which would hold all of the hard drives and other peripherals though, I wanted to make it a little bit more heavy duty. So, I made it with 3/4" plywood and a whole bunch of pocket holes. It was actually nice because it added strength and was also a lot easier to build not having to cut the dados and everything.



Anyway, I would highly recommend the Kreg Jig for drawers. They're not the fanciest solution, but they can be 100% hidden and they are incredibly strong!
Thanks All.

Derek, in your front desk drawers, are those 1/2" ply for the front and sides with a 1/2" panel for the base ?

Chris
Chris V said:
Thanks All.
Derek, in your front desk drawers, are those 1/2" ply for the front and sides with a 1/2" panel for the base ?
Chris

Chris, the front drawers are 1/2" baltic birch plywood on the sides, and a 1/4" cherry plywood supported with dados on the bottom. The back (hidden) drawer is heavier with 1/2" plywood on both the sides and the bottom. The bottom has probably 20 pocket holes in it holding it to the drawer sides.

On my nightstands, I didn't have 1/2" material, so I actually used 3/4" plywood on all sides and on the bottom. Needless to say, you could run it over with a truck and it would easily survive. They've very heavy, and obviously overkill... but that's the only type of plywood I had around and I guess... when in doubt, make it stronger!
Thanks Derek.

FYI, I'm building some knee-wall drawers for my daughters bedroom and want to balance strength and weight. Going to build fairly large and deep drawers and will probably go with 1/2 birch plywood all around, pocket screws and glue. It sounds as though the combination should be plenty strong enough for clothing even though there will be a good quantity and the obvious over-stuffing that will likely take place :)

Chris
Steve, I'd be interested in seeing what you end up doing for the clothes rack too. Not sure what you have in mind.

Steve McCullough said:
Chris,
I will be following this "thread" closely as my next DIY project is a built-in for a small walk in closet. My wife wanted drawers, rather than shelves or bins. The top half of the built-in will have a pull down clothes rack, and the bottom half will have 6 drawers. I ordered some supplies from "McFeely's" (which is an awesome web site) yesterday and I ordered the very book that Phillip referenced. The book was $5.
Good luck and keep us up to date with the progress.

Steve
It will be a few weeks before I get started, but I'll be posting pictures and probably asking for lots of advice. The closet is 50 inches wide, but only 48 inches deep. A small but technically walk in closet. It has two old fashioned wall to wall dowel rod poles to hang clothes on high and low with a bare shelf separating the high hung clothes from the lower. Its not much, but doing a built in would help (I think).

Chris V said:
Steve, I'd be interested in seeing what you end up doing for the clothes rack too. Not sure what you have in mind.

Steve McCullough said:
Chris,
I will be following this "thread" closely as my next DIY project is a built-in for a small walk in closet. My wife wanted drawers, rather than shelves or bins. The top half of the built-in will have a pull down clothes rack, and the bottom half will have 6 drawers. I ordered some supplies from "McFeely's" (which is an awesome web site) yesterday and I ordered the very book that Phillip referenced. The book was $5.
Good luck and keep us up to date with the progress.

Steve
Phillip said:
Another issue I have made on a couple of other threads. If you do not have the tool, training, or cash -- use what you have. It would be arrogant of me or anyone else to belittle any work when someone does not have "the" tool. If you do not have a router table, and router, then why worry about a groove? Use the pocket screw, get the advantage of the drawer and make a new more elegant version in the future.

Amen! I completely agree! If I would have had to build my project with Mortise and Tenon, I literally wouldn't have built it. For me the Kreg Jig makes projects more accessible (and fun).




Phillip said:
BTW: That is a really nice looking desk! It looks like you have something for the future to hand down to grandchildren. Also the staining job looks very nice. I can never get the finish to work that good. I have tried everything and suspect I have a finishing deficit, or stain challenged. Well -- I stain my shirts pretty good.

Thank you very much... it was my first woodworking project ever, actually! I had a really good teacher though. Everyone thought I was crazy with the dark stain, but I really like that look so I just went for it. The stain is a "Java" gel stain. It's very dark, but when the sun hits it it explodes with color. As you can probably tell from the photos, I had major finishing problems as well, so don't feel bad! I actually had to completely strip off the clear coat and start over. It was horrible. (but definitely worth it!)


Steve, I am going to be doing some closet organizing as well. Here's an idea I borrowed from Ikea: Instead of making drawers, just make your cabinet frames (with your Kreg jig, of course), and use your router or a dado blade to cut slots in it. Then pick up some of Ikea's storage bins that are designed to slide into those dados. For a better idea of what I'm talking about, go to Ikea's website and type this into the search box: TROFAST COMBINATION . That's what I'm going to be doing in at least one closet.

Steve McCullough said:
It will be a few weeks before I get started, but I'll be posting pictures and probably asking for lots of advice. The closet is 50 inches wide, but only 48 inches deep. A small but technically walk in closet. It has two old fashioned wall to wall dowel rod poles to hang clothes on high and low with a bare shelf separating the high hung clothes from the lower. Its not much, but doing a built in would help (I think).

Chris V said:
Steve, I'd be interested in seeing what you end up doing for the clothes rack too. Not sure what you have in mind.

Steve McCullough said:
Chris,
I will be following this "thread" closely as my next DIY project is a built-in for a small walk in closet. My wife wanted drawers, rather than shelves or bins. The top half of the built-in will have a pull down clothes rack, and the bottom half will have 6 drawers. I ordered some supplies from "McFeely's" (which is an awesome web site) yesterday and I ordered the very book that Phillip referenced. The book was $5.
Good luck and keep us up to date with the progress.

Steve
Thanks Jessee. I will check that out. My wife is insistant on "drawers" not bins or shelves, but she may like something like that. Again, thanks for the info.

Jesse McNew said:
Steve, I am going to be doing some closet organizing as well. Here's an idea I borrowed from Ikea: Instead of making drawers, just make your cabinet frames (with your Kreg jig, of course), and use your router or a dado blade to cut slots in it. Then pick up some of Ikea's storage bins that are designed to slide into those dados. For a better idea of what I'm talking about, go to Ikea's website and type this into the search box: TROFAST COMBINATION . That's what I'm going to be doing in at least one closet.

Steve McCullough said:
It will be a few weeks before I get started, but I'll be posting pictures and probably asking for lots of advice. The closet is 50 inches wide, but only 48 inches deep. A small but technically walk in closet. It has two old fashioned wall to wall dowel rod poles to hang clothes on high and low with a bare shelf separating the high hung clothes from the lower. Its not much, but doing a built in would help (I think).

Chris V said:
Steve, I'd be interested in seeing what you end up doing for the clothes rack too. Not sure what you have in mind.

Steve McCullough said:
Chris,
I will be following this "thread" closely as my next DIY project is a built-in for a small walk in closet. My wife wanted drawers, rather than shelves or bins. The top half of the built-in will have a pull down clothes rack, and the bottom half will have 6 drawers. I ordered some supplies from "McFeely's" (which is an awesome web site) yesterday and I ordered the very book that Phillip referenced. The book was $5.
Good luck and keep us up to date with the progress.

Steve

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