Kreg Owners' Community

Do many of you close up shop for the colder months and if so, how do you prepare?   I am nearing the end of a project, and will be preparing for the winter months soon.  Any tips for winter storage?  I plan to place a coat of wax on the table saw top.  Store with blade or remove?  Glue, stains, and finishes should be brought inside?  We all put a lot of expense into the shop, so I certainly want to preserve everything from the tools purchased to the supplies used from start to finish!

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I do not close up for winter I use a kerosene to keep warm when working also a ac in summer I like to be comfortable. You should bring in anything that will freeze inside .  You may want to put some plastic on the floor to keep moisture from the ground but do not cover tools as it locks in the moisture on them. 

What about all those rechargeable batteries for the cordless tools?   Will they lose their charging ability being exposed to the cold?

Hi Rita, in answer to your question .Batteries do not like temperatures much below zero , so maybe better to bring inside if your workshop gets really cold or damp . Put them in a cupboard that is cool though ,batteries do not like to much heat either .Also if your leaving the batteries dormant for three months ,might be a idea to give them a booster charge for a hour per month . I tend to use batteries in my little shop all thru winter ,but our winters not as cold as yours  brrrrrr .

Rita,

Winter Storage

Iron materials, such as on table saws, drill press, planers, and the like, will oxidize/develop rust.

For long term storage, greater than 30 days, I apply a rust preventative coating.

Clean the surfaces with mineral spirits then apply the protective coating.

Boiled linseed oil is readily available and suffices nicely, as a protective coating.

Wipe-on for a thin protective layer or brush it on. Allow to rest 10-15 minutes.

Wipe off the access, leaving a thin protective film.

When you get ready to use your wood working tools, and the like, remove the coating with mineral spirits, and apply a finishing paste wax.

Yard and garden tools can also be protected, using boiled linseed oil.

Wire brush the soil from the surfaces, scrape the access rust, brush on a coating of boiled linseed oil.

Many tools can be treated with boiled linseed oil to prevent rusting.

Clean of any dirt or soil---don't remove the patina.

Remove the saw blades, and apply a suitable lube to the threaded shafts.

Glues, paints and finish materials, need to be stored/protected from freezing temps.

Store where temps are above 50 degrees.

Batteries

Store-in above freezing temps.

Drycell fully charged batteries, exposed to freezing temps, will have much less stored energy capacity, perhaps less than 50% capacity.

DO NOT allow them to be in contact the ground or concrete.

Place on wood and layered with newspapers, or the like. 

(wood and newspaper will act as an insulation).

Ni-Cad batteries 

Recharge monthly.   

Storing for greater than 30 days, discharge the batteries.

(I put them in a flashlight, leave it on 'til the battery is drained, followed by storing in above freezing temps).

Lith-ion

I recharge monthly during long term storage (greater than 30 days).

Gel-Cell (wet cell) Batteries

Consult with the battery OEM.

Lead-Acid (wet cell) batteries

Consult with the battery OEM.

For long term winter storage of outdoor lawn equipment, and the like,

I remove the batteries and store them indoors, placed in a suitable ventilated container, and resting on wood and newspapers.  

(Ventilation required to prevent access gases forming to prevent an explosion).

I use a low amp trickle-charger, with an auto shut-off feature, to keep them warm and charged.

After fully charged, I recharge them monthly.

DO NOT store batteries indoors near a furnace, water heater or other heating device.

Good advice Ken ,how you doing these days ?
 
Ken Darga said:

Rita,

Winter Storage

Iron materials, such as on table saws, drill press, planers, and the like, will oxidize/develop rust.

For long term storage, greater than 30 days, I apply a rust preventative coating.

Clean the surfaces with mineral spirits then apply the protective coating.

Boiled linseed oil is readily available and suffices nicely, as a protective coating.

Wipe-on for a thin protective layer or brush it on. Allow to rest 10-15 minutes.

Wipe off the access, leaving a thin protective film.

When you get ready to use your wood working tools, and the like, remove the coating with mineral spirits, and apply a finishing paste wax.

Yard and garden tools can also be protected, using boiled linseed oil.

Wire brush the soil from the surfaces, scrape the access rust, brush on a coating of boiled linseed oil.

Many tools can be treated with boiled linseed oil to prevent rusting.

Clean of any dirt or soil---don't remove the patina.

Remove the saw blades, and apply a suitable lube to the threaded shafts.

Glues, paints and finish materials, need to be stored/protected from freezing temps.

Store where temps are above 50 degrees.

Batteries

Store-in above freezing temps.

Drycell fully charged batteries, exposed to freezing temps, will have much less stored energy capacity, perhaps less than 50% capacity.

DO NOT allow them to be in contact the ground or concrete.

Place on wood and layered with newspapers, or the like. 

(wood and newspaper will act as an insulation).

Ni-Cad batteries 

Recharge monthly.   

Storing for greater than 30 days, discharge the batteries.

(I put them in a flashlight, leave it on 'til the battery is drained, followed by storing in above freezing temps).

Lith-ion

I recharge monthly during long term storage (greater than 30 days).

Gel-Cell (wet cell) Batteries

Consult with the battery OEM.

Lead-Acid (wet cell) batteries

Consult with the battery OEM.

For long term winter storage of outdoor lawn equipment, and the like,

I remove the batteries and store them indoors, placed in a suitable ventilated container, and resting on wood and newspapers.  

(Ventilation required to prevent access gases forming to prevent an explosion).

I use a low amp trickle-charger, with an auto shut-off feature, to keep them warm and charged.

After fully charged, I recharge them monthly.

DO NOT store batteries indoors near a furnace, water heater or other heating device.

Thanks Mick.

Doing okay.

Just busier than a one legged cat in a sand box.

michael evans said:

Good advice Ken ,how you doing these days ?

 


 

Busier than a one legged cat in a sand box ....what?

Please explain for those confused!

Thanks so much for the tips!  I had no idea about the boiled linseed oil.   I will pick some up the next time I am out as well as some containers for all those smaller items that will need to be brought in. 

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