Kreg Owners' Community

To my heartfelt disgust, I have been informed by the great members here that if I want to do any serious routing, like raised door panels and such, I would need to replace my small 1/4 inch shaft router with a larger 1/2 inch, and also replace my bit collection.

I have looked into these larger routers and have discovered a large difference in price among the many manufactures.

I would like to know what 1/2 inch router you own, and if you like it and if you have had any problems with it.

Thanks very much

Mike

Views: 978

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Mike - You can do raised panels panels with a small router. There are a VERY limited number of profiles available in 1/4" shanks and you do need to make them in several passes so it can be done. Probably not something you want to do and you would be pretty well limited to shaker style.

To get to your question, arguably, one of the best deals going today is the Craftsman 17543 kit. Variable speed, above table adjustments, both of which are a good thing. BTW, you will need a table to put it in. Anyway, it has been selling between $80 and $120, depending on if you can catch it on sale.

Most use a 3+ HP big dog for raised panels but those are $300 range. For those look at the DeWalt 625, Freud 2200, Triton TRA001 or Porter Cable 7518.

Hi Mike I Have a porter cabler 893 pk that

i have an extra fixed base for so I keep the one base mounted in the table and the other is available for free handed work, I can make raised panels with this router but it's teadious taking only really small cuts at a time I think a 3 and 1/4 hp router is a much better choice, other then the raised panel issue this router does do everything else I want it to do and it does it well

Hi Mike, I agree with much of what John says. Another option is the bosch ev1617, You can do raised panels easily if you take a little bit at a time 1/8 inch at the most. Start with the  two ends first (end grain) and then do with the grain this will clean up the tearout made by your first two passes of end grain. the bosch is a little more expensive then the craftsman but in my opinion is a better router.

 

Joe

Anyone use a Hitachi? Looking at this one:

http://www.dynamitetoolco.com/Hitachi-M12V2-3-1-4-HP-EVS-Plunge-Rou...

 

saw somewhere that you can connect it to 220volt.... 15 amp on 110, and probably around 8 amp on 220.

I like saving electricity.....

Hi Mike - Lotsa guys on routerforums have that bad boy installed in their tables. Don't have one myself, I run the Freud 3000. I have heard that some of the M12's need the bushing adapter ears ground off to clear the 3" plus bits but don't know if that's one of them.  I also don't know about running on 220, I suspect it is a universal motor and cannot be wired for 220. If their are sold in the UK though you may be able to get your hands on a limey version. The 50/60 cycle difference may bite you though. Regardless, that's a good price on a big router.

Mike Kahle said:

Anyone use a Hitachi? Looking at this one:

http://www.dynamitetoolco.com/Hitachi-M12V2-3-1-4-HP-EVS-Plunge-Rou...

 

saw somewhere that you can connect it to 220volt.... 15 amp on 110, and probably around 8 amp on 220.

I like saving electricity.....

Mike,

 

Don't get stuck on amperage. You pay the electric company for wattage. Whether it's 10 amps on 110 volts or 5 amps on 220 volts, it's 1100 watts either way. Reducing the amperage allows you to run through a smaller circuit breaker but doesn't really save that much electricity.

I run a Porter Cable 7518 in my router table and have been nothing but pleased with it. Cutting raised panels requires a lot of power and you really need the stability that a 1/2" shank offers. It's a large investment, but it takes your woodworking to the next level. Many 1/2" routers offer a 1/4" collet, so replacing all your bits isn't an immediate concern.



Mike Kahle said:

Anyone use a Hitachi? Looking at this one:

http://www.dynamitetoolco.com/Hitachi-M12V2-3-1-4-HP-EVS-Plunge-Rou...

 

saw somewhere that you can connect it to 220volt.... 15 amp on 110, and probably around 8 amp on 220.

I like saving electricity.....

hi mike, i have the big triton router on my router table, and yes i really like it. plenty of power and nice features. i would buy it again in a heart beat.

Mike I have a hitachii mv12 with  3 1/4 hp and it is mounted under a router table and is the main workhors for doing all my raised panels both arched and square doors.  It has a 1/2 collet which  is the absoulte best for doing the raise panels.  The 1/2 bits are hearty and have the necessary stength to cut some very nice panels in all kinds of wood.  This one spins a 3" CMT bit cutting hickory and hard wood with out difficulty.  I have been using this router for several years without any trouble. 

I also have the triton trc001 which is also a 3 1/4 hp router and it is also mounted under a router table.  it is a hearty cutting router with excellent performance and also able to handle heavy cutting duties.  If I was going to have only one router in the shop for a table it would be my first pick.  It has excellent debth control while in a table using the winder knob and mirco winder system allows the through the table top adjustments on a rack and pinion design. 

2nd Try

 

Yes Mike 1/2" collet routers are the standard 1/4" are usually "trimmers"

I have had a Makita 3600B Square Base for over 20 years, the only problem I had with it was the on/off switch was broken, and I think it was from impact damage rather than "worn out"

I have also 2x other ones which are low budget Ryobi's both ERT1250 VNs 1x I use onlyfor 3D routing and 1x I use for general work in my router Table (actually its a box converted).

The only "problem" I would be able to relate to is,

1. With the Makita it has only a on/off switch so hang on to it when you turn it on. Dont let inexperienced people use it without warning them.

The Ryobi's have electronic speed control

All are 240 VAC 50 Hz

 

I have 2x trimmers 1x a Ryobi TR-50A and a Hitachi M6SB. The only reason I have the Hitachi is because it has a tilting base and it has a spindle lock.

However beware, the Hitachi somehow when I was using it managed to vibrate out (I guess) the spindle lock.

I was unaware this had occured until I went to remove the router bit, because there is no spanner face on the spindle to lock it I had to put the Carbide tip in my vice to remove it, and chipped it as well, thus ruining it.

Boy was I pissed off by all this.

As fate would have it I found the Trimmer had a 12 month warranty (6Months old) so it  has gone for a warranty repair.

Routers have got to be one of the most versatile items you can have in the workshop, however like all machines used incorrectly can be lethal to your self and to your workpiece.

In saying this you can cut raised panels with your table saw and produce some basic shapes with a bit of skill.

Also in addition to what I mentioned above doing panels on a router with a large bit you should have it table mounted.

 

Hugh, when I read this reply I thought "what is he smoking?" but I dug out my Ugly (took an hour to find it) and did the formula..... you are dead on... not sure what I was thinking.... and you are right, they do charge by wattage.... I have done electrical for years and have never been able to memorize the formulas, always had to pull out the Ugly book. I think I was thinking less amps equaled less cost....

Anyway, thanks for setting me straight....

 

Hugh Clare said:

Mike,

 

Don't get stuck on amperage. You pay the electric company for wattage. Whether it's 10 amps on 110 volts or 5 amps on 220 volts, it's 1100 watts either way. Reducing the amperage allows you to run through a smaller circuit breaker but doesn't really save that much electricity.

I think I have decided on the Hitachi M12V.

Now... there is a M12V2..... a M12Vc.... and a M12Ve

 

Cant find all three on one site to compare the differences.... So... can anyone shed some light on this for me?

 

Thanks again

I bought the new Skil 1830 fix base and plunge setup. Has  led lights variable speed, 1/2 collect with 1/4 reducer.Also has soft start no jerking on start up. all for $99.00

 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Pantry slides for heavy application

  Recently purchased two 96" tall pantry cabinets that are 23" deep that only came with two adjustable shelves and two fixed, (one at about 55" and one at the very bottom).  Shelf holes in the walls are drilled 2" O.C.  Like most store-bought…Continue

Tags: drawer, slides, pantry, pull-out, 75-Lb

Started by Paul Coon in General Woodworking Aug 11.

Miter Saw Recommendation 1 Reply

I’m looking to upgrade my miter saw. I’m willing to invest a good amount of money to get one with the precision pocket hole joinery requires. Would anyone like to offer a recommended model?

Started by Joe Racz in Beginners' Zone. Last reply by Scott Davison Oct 6.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 8 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_