Kreg Owners' Community

Hi all ,got a problem with my bandsaw.Had her a couple of years now,but never truly been happy with it.Its only a hobby rated saw ,but still cost me the equilvant of $350.I do not use it everyday but no matter what i do to the set up it will not cut any sort of reasonable curve even a slow S curve.I tried all the usual things Tension ,Tracking,Thrust bearing clearance,and a new quarter inch blade 6tpi.The blade allways veers to the left when trying to attempt a curve,got to be tension i thought .Tightened the tension a couple of turns and bang the blade snapped.So after i changed my underwear went back to it but still the same problem cannot understand it guys do you think i need a better quality blade?Or a new bandsaw?Would like to have a bash at a bandsaw box [no chance at the moment]so i got the bandsaw blues guys.HELP"

Views: 1137

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

What type of guides do you have? I would hazard a guess that your guides are the culprit. Band saws tend to creep to one side regardless, but you should at least be able to predict the direction it's going to cut. I can't think of any adjustment to the wheels that would have this effect.

Minimize the gap, between the upper guides and the work-piece.

A gap of 1/4 is sufficient.

Adjust the spacing of upper guides to each side of the blade, of a thickness of masking tape.

The back-side of the blade should just touch the back stop block or roller.

A 1/8 blade is more suitable for making smaller radii.  

(NOTE: The saw must be capable of accepting 1/8'' thick blades.

FEED RATE:

allow the saw blade to cut freely, allowing the saw teeth to carry away the sawdust.

DO NOT use excessive force feeding.

A 6 tpi, (coarse tooth blade), generally requires a slow feed rate.

Thanks Hugh and ken ,i did use a thin piece of card for a shim maybe i need to have a finer tolerance . So will try your idea Ken[masking tape]. Not aware if will accept a 1/8 blade are look in the manual Ken.However i do keep a minimum as possible gap between the workpiece and the guides,and allways do a slow feed rate.As allways thanks for the advice chaps.

Hi Mike.

Fold a sort piece (approx 1'' long) of general purpose masking tape to fit over the blade. 

Position the tape, starting from the back-side of the blade---fold forward, toward the teeth---press firmly in place.

(Masking tape is about .005' thick, (on this side of the big pond).

Move the blade by hand, up-and-down, with the tape between the blocks or rollers.

Adjust the blocks/rollers, so they just touch, (no pressure), the tape on the blade. 

The blade needs to move freely---without continuous rubbing on the tape.

Remove the tape and proceed.

(Automotive feeler gauges can also be used.  Tape is the simplest).

Thanks Ken will do , thanks for taking the trouble to help .

Thanks for your reply, Mike.

No trouble---

happy to help a fellow woodworker.

Just sharing some of my knowledge and experiences.

Hope it helps.

Fine-tuning a band saw be a frustrating and time consuming task.

For many small band sawing type tasks, I invested in the Rockwell BladeRunner.

A handy tool for use in a small shop and for on-the-job site tasks.

Lightweight---Portable and compact---variable speed---vac dust port---built-in carrying handle.

Up front accessible and removable saw dust collection tray, catches the sawdust below the table.

Easy blade change.

A pull-out blade storage tray, for at-the-ready access.

Nice little cutting machine.

I find it very useful for cutting thin stock and up to 3/4 stock---

also works well for scroll cutting.  (Not a substitute for a scroll saw, that utilizes the very small and thin blades, intended for scroll cutting).

I find this tool more useful over all the small size band saws.

Michael or anybody - what exactly takes place when the blade breaks?  Loud noise?  Any chance of blade coming in contact with your hands?  Does blade get tangled up in wheels? 

Ken = I also have the Blade Runner.  I use it on some occasions but not many.  I use it more for small metal cutting than wood.   I have a little 9" Ryobi band saw (probably 15 years old) and that is my go to saw.  I also have a 14" Grizzly Polar Bear Band Saw for bigger stuff, but when I can I use the Ryobi first.  Actually thinking about buying another 9" Ryobi, hoping the newer ones are as good as my older one.

As for cutting curves, I have a 3/8" blade on Ryobi and it cuts some decent curves.  Scroll saw is probably best for sharp curves. 

Band-Saw Blade Breaking:

A band saw breaking has happened, many times for me.

It can happen in a blink of an eye, and it seems like for no apparent reason.

You’ll be cutting along, taking it easy, and ‘’snap’’ the blade breaks.

No warning.

Generally NO sound---sometimes a snap can be heard, and you hear the blade flapping around in the housing.

 

When the blade breaks, the separation in generally near the table area.

When it stops cutting, the motor and drive wheel are still in motion.

Quickly disconnect power to the unit.

Fins,  

I’ve examined the current Ryobi band-saw, and will not invest in it.

I won’t waste my time even setting one up.

The small 2amp motor stalls, cutting ¾’’ soft wood.  

Blade binds cutting PVC pipe.

It limited to ¼’’ blades---blades difficult to find.

Even the stores that sell them, don’t stock the blades.

 

Perhaps the older models are better.

 

Powertec 9’’ band saw is a better choice.   Blades size 1/8-3/8’’ blades.

 

Craftsman 10’’, 3.5 amp 1/3HP  motor, is better investment than their 9’’ model, or the Ryobi 9’’.

 

Peruse the various band saws on the market.  Check their blade sizes, TIP, limitations and availability. 

Hi fins no danger of contact with hands blade is well enclosed. There was a bit of a bang when the blade snapped but the blade did not tangle up just laid in the casing ,guess thats good for safety .
 
Fins59 said:

Michael or anybody - what exactly takes place when the blade breaks?  Loud noise?  Any chance of blade coming in contact with your hands?  Does blade get tangled up in wheels? 

Ken = I also have the Blade Runner.  I use it on some occasions but not many.  I use it more for small metal cutting than wood.   I have a little 9" Ryobi band saw (probably 15 years old) and that is my go to saw.  I also have a 14" Grizzly Polar Bear Band Saw for bigger stuff, but when I can I use the Ryobi first.  Actually thinking about buying another 9" Ryobi, hoping the newer ones are as good as my older one.

As for cutting curves, I have a 3/8" blade on Ryobi and it cuts some decent curves.  Scroll saw is probably best for sharp curves. 

Good morning Ken, at least it is here in the UK.Ken tried your tip with the masking tape i think its a marked improvement.Allthough i have set her up with a 1/2" blade at the moment .I have on order a 1/4" 10tpi.I mainly cut plexiglass and small trim cuts in timber with the bandsaw ,hence why not really had a issue with curves before .Should have got you to road test it first Ken ha ha.The machine is a 10" with a 375 watt motor what that equates to in amps i have no idea not alot i suspect.After reading your comments on the ryobi i think my machine maybe a little under powered.It does get bogged down with anything over 1" thick.Will try with the new blade and let you know .The bladerunner looks a interesting piece of kit, kinda a hybreed i am not aware of anything over here similiar.If all as fails i will be looking in to replaceing my bandsaw for something with more power and of better quality.I have seen some Delta bandsaws in action on the internet look to perform so much better than mine maybe i have got a piece of rubbish thanks for your replys MICK.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Popular Posts & Projects 

1 Parts

Parts

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Parts

The Clamp anchor screw broke on my mobile project center.  How can I acquire a replacement?Continue

Started by Jon J Howard in Beginners' Zone 12 hours ago.

Rip-cut ACS plunge saw

Just got a rip-cut and installed my Bosch saw haven't used it yet but saw was a good fit. Got the original ripcut and didn't really like it had trouble cutting straight. New one has several improvements should make it work much better. especially…Continue

Started by William Burt Brown in General Woodworking Mar 17.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 4 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_