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Dad did a lot of wood work and always had a bottle of Elmer's wood glue around. He also always had a can of WD-40 and 3-in-one oil. In the past several years I've become aware of different type oils and lubricants and how they have changed and improved over time. Maybe glue is the same. I see Gorilla glue mentioned pretty often.

What are the opinions out there of different wood glue? Why use Gorilla instead of Elmer's or any other brand name? I've always heard that the glued joint is stronger than the wood that has been glued together. I tried and I don't remember any glued wood joint coming apart because of  the glue failing. I also can't remember any other type glue being 100% effective. But when gluing plastic, metal or other materials I'm no expert at all. I'm pretty sure some of the failures were due to me not knowing enough about adhesives or how to use them for what they were designed for. But so far any wood glue seems to have worked for me.

Now though I want to start making things that CAN'T come apart in the future due to poor glue or me using it incorrectly. I have made a couple of shelves in my shop that are just thrown together and don't need to look great. On some of these things I just throw together I have used wood glue along with the Kreg jig to drill holes and screw the pieces together. Then after I'm sure the glue is dry I take the screws out to use later. So as mentioned in a video I watched I've used the Kreg system and screws more as a clamping system for the piece instead of actual clamps.

Anyway, does anyone have a preference of a particular wood glue?  Do glues vary in performance with different type wood?  Or will any wood glue do?  Thanks for any help.

Jack

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Speaking of door jams (and quite a bit more), Many years ago I enclosed our carport. I did it myself. I am not a carpenter but pretty handy and we (Dad, brother and me), did most of the work on the inside of a house Dad had built. They built a "shell" they called it. All the exterior stuff was done (windows, doors, siding, etc.). We (the three of us) did everything else. We did the elec. wiring (except for the box), sheet-rock, hardwood floors and carpeting, interior doors, all molding on doors and windows, flooring, heating duct, etc.). Pros did the plumbing. Anyway, I learned so much that summer it has been worth probably more than half my early education. Of course being about 14, I hated it. :) Anyway, with that type knowledge and whatever else I've done in life I enclosed my carport. This was about 20 years ago I think.  I looked up how to do things like frame windows and doors. But, we had roof damage resulting in water damage in the wall.  Now I need to replace the door and some of the wall beside it. There is a concrete foundation. I put bolts in the concrete when it was wet to attach the bottom board and added adhesive also.  Vinyl siding outside. Sheet-rock inside.  My plan with my knowledge (which is very limited) is just to take off the siding and sheetrock and replace whatever wood is bad and add a door. At this point when I start removing the visible stuff (siding and sheetrock) I don't know how much of the wall (2x4 studs) I'll need to replace.

 

I feel comfortable doing this but I know there is a lot I don't know that would make the job easier or more importantly I want a good end result. Picture a concrete slab and a roof that at one time was a car port roof. How would you put up a wall with a door? That's actually what I did and will be doing again once I get any water damaged wood out. I am pretty proud of the job I did originally. If it hadn't been for the roof damage that we didn't know about until enough water had seeped into the walls do damage there also, the room has been great. I did it like Dad did the stuff in his house. Whatever needed to be done that I didn't know how to do I got a book. This was pre-computer and internet times. It seems half even the full grown adults don't remember those days. I'll shut up because I'm beginning to feel old. Anyway, I feel confident with this project because I have a Kreg jig and I got a bottle of titebond III yesterday. What else do you need??? lol

 

Any help or advice from anyone is GREATLY appreciated. Internet site recommendations would be great.

 

Jack

That is a beautiful table Jay. There's only half a table though. Run out of wood did ya???  lol Seriously, great, great work.

Jay Boutwell said:

Carol,  The dye is the one made for coloring plastic and fiberglass jel.  Most of the places that sell plastic products sell it as well as in some crafts stores.  Look for casting resin and in that area you might find it.  They may only sell the liquid transparent type but I have seen a limited assortment of the opaque stuff which is like a cream.  I get mine at "Tap Plastics" and get it in a small plastic jar.  It is strong and a little goes a long ways especially the black.  Crafts stores sometimes sell it and it use is for dying the casting resin and on occasions it is used for doing small enlay work where you do not want to use wood as the enlay.  The two black stripes in the table top and the tear drops is some of the resin with a black dye.  The other is purple heart.  This is on my photos and or project page as well as some other examples.  Take care and happy woodworking.
 
carol said:

Jay, tell me more about the dye you use pls. I can find the resin, np, but not sure what sort of dye to look for. Thx!

Jack, first off, if there is water damage, you may have black mold too. That's dangerous so wear a mask while you demo the old stuff out. Once inside the framing, take a look to see if there is mold. There are chemicals you can buy to kill it and then seal the wood to prevent it from coming back - or you can replace the wood, as you suggested. If you replace the framing and door jamb (if I'm reading you question right) make sure you have everything supported as you wouldn't want the roof to collapse on you. I'm guessing that the roof was well supported at the time you enclosed the building but now it may have weakened some due to the water damage. A couple of 4 x 4's should work as temporary supports until the framing is replaced safely. Ultimately, the big concern is black mold. Go online and read up about it BEFORE you do any work. The job will be much easier and your health will be better Hope this helps. Mike

Jack Haskins, Jr. said:

Speaking of door jams (and quite a bit more), Many years ago I enclosed our carport. I did it myself. I am not a carpenter but pretty handy and we (Dad, brother and me), did most of the work on the inside of a house Dad had built. They built a "shell" they called it. All the exterior stuff was done (windows, doors, siding, etc.). We (the three of us) did everything else. We did the elec. wiring (except for the box), sheet-rock, hardwood floors and carpeting, interior doors, all molding on doors and windows, flooring, heating duct, etc.). Pros did the plumbing. Anyway, I learned so much that summer it has been worth probably more than half my early education. Of course being about 14, I hated it. :) Anyway, with that type knowledge and whatever else I've done in life I enclosed my carport. This was about 20 years ago I think.  I looked up how to do things like frame windows and doors. But, we had roof damage resulting in water damage in the wall.  Now I need to replace the door and some of the wall beside it. There is a concrete foundation. I put bolts in the concrete when it was wet to attach the bottom board and added adhesive also.  Vinyl siding outside. Sheet-rock inside.  My plan with my knowledge (which is very limited) is just to take off the siding and sheetrock and replace whatever wood is bad and add a door. At this point when I start removing the visible stuff (siding and sheetrock) I don't know how much of the wall (2x4 studs) I'll need to replace.

 

I feel comfortable doing this but I know there is a lot I don't know that would make the job easier or more importantly I want a good end result. Picture a concrete slab and a roof that at one time was a car port roof. How would you put up a wall with a door? That's actually what I did and will be doing again once I get any water damaged wood out. I am pretty proud of the job I did originally. If it hadn't been for the roof damage that we didn't know about until enough water had seeped into the walls do damage there also, the room has been great. I did it like Dad did the stuff in his house. Whatever needed to be done that I didn't know how to do I got a book. This was pre-computer and internet times. It seems half even the full grown adults don't remember those days. I'll shut up because I'm beginning to feel old. Anyway, I feel confident with this project because I have a Kreg jig and I got a bottle of titebond III yesterday. What else do you need??? lol

 

Any help or advice from anyone is GREATLY appreciated. Internet site recommendations would be great.

 

Jack

I didn't even think about mold.  The guys who repaired the roof didn't say anything about it so maybe they didn't find any. I assume they would have recognized it if they saw it but you never know. I'll look it up to see what to look for and how to treat whatever I find. Thanks for that tip.  I have a little time. The wall and door are still usable. Plus, and I'm pretty excited, I'm having a bunch of lumber delivered today to replace most of a deck we have around an above ground pool. My son is coming over to help. He now has a 5 year old son and a 12 year old step-daughter. Looking forward to them having fun in the pool which is filling up as I type. It's about half way full now. It's 24' in diameter and 4' deep but in the middle we dug out two feet deeper so we can jump in. I have a slide to mount on the deck. Everything should be done this week sometime. There's about 2 feet around the circumference that you can walk. Then a drastic drop off to 6 feet deep. Looking forward to the work and the fun too. Getting older now though and MAN, I can feel it. Can't fight time though.

Thanks,

Jack

Mike Atencio said:

Jack, first off, if there is water damage, you may have black mold too. That's dangerous so wear a mask while you demo the old stuff out. Once inside the framing, take a look to see if there is mold. There are chemicals you can buy to kill it and then seal the wood to prevent it from coming back - or you can replace the wood, as you suggested. If you replace the framing and door jamb (if I'm reading you question right) make sure you have everything supported as you wouldn't want the roof to collapse on you. I'm guessing that the roof was well supported at the time you enclosed the building but now it may have weakened some due to the water damage. A couple of 4 x 4's should work as temporary supports until the framing is replaced safely. Ultimately, the big concern is black mold. Go online and read up about it BEFORE you do any work. The job will be much easier and your health will be better Hope this helps. Mike

Jack Haskins, Jr. said:

Speaking of door jams (and quite a bit more), Many years ago I enclosed our carport. I did it myself. I am not a carpenter but pretty handy and we (Dad, brother and me), did most of the work on the inside of a house Dad had built. They built a "shell" they called it. All the exterior stuff was done (windows, doors, siding, etc.). We (the three of us) did everything else. We did the elec. wiring (except for the box), sheet-rock, hardwood floors and carpeting, interior doors, all molding on doors and windows, flooring, heating duct, etc.). Pros did the plumbing. Anyway, I learned so much that summer it has been worth probably more than half my early education. Of course being about 14, I hated it. :) Anyway, with that type knowledge and whatever else I've done in life I enclosed my carport. This was about 20 years ago I think.  I looked up how to do things like frame windows and doors. But, we had roof damage resulting in water damage in the wall.  Now I need to replace the door and some of the wall beside it. There is a concrete foundation. I put bolts in the concrete when it was wet to attach the bottom board and added adhesive also.  Vinyl siding outside. Sheet-rock inside.  My plan with my knowledge (which is very limited) is just to take off the siding and sheetrock and replace whatever wood is bad and add a door. At this point when I start removing the visible stuff (siding and sheetrock) I don't know how much of the wall (2x4 studs) I'll need to replace.

 

I feel comfortable doing this but I know there is a lot I don't know that would make the job easier or more importantly I want a good end result. Picture a concrete slab and a roof that at one time was a car port roof. How would you put up a wall with a door? That's actually what I did and will be doing again once I get any water damaged wood out. I am pretty proud of the job I did originally. If it hadn't been for the roof damage that we didn't know about until enough water had seeped into the walls do damage there also, the room has been great. I did it like Dad did the stuff in his house. Whatever needed to be done that I didn't know how to do I got a book. This was pre-computer and internet times. It seems half even the full grown adults don't remember those days. I'll shut up because I'm beginning to feel old. Anyway, I feel confident with this project because I have a Kreg jig and I got a bottle of titebond III yesterday. What else do you need??? lol

 

Any help or advice from anyone is GREATLY appreciated. Internet site recommendations would be great.

 

Jack

TransTint-Dyes

available from Rockler Woodworking

2 oz bottles in several colors

a concentrated dye solution for use on bare wood

Mix with water, non-flammable stain or with alcohol/ lacquer thinner for a fast drying, non-grain raising stain. For use as a finish toner, simply add the dye concentrate to shellac, water-base finishes, solvent lacquers, and catalyzed varnish or lacquers.

All colors are intermixable to produce custom shades.

Ideal for tinting woodworking glues, touch up and repair work, and adjusting the color of pre-mixed stains.

Not intended for exterior use.

Ken this is not the same dye to use in a resin mixture.  The type needed for is the same as used for
coloring fiberglass resin and available at many commercial products companies and crafts store and can be ordered at AMAZON.
Ken Darga said:

TransTint-Dyes

available from Rockler Woodworking

2 oz bottles in several colors

a concentrated dye solution for use on bare wood

Mix with water, non-flammable stain or with alcohol/ lacquer thinner for a fast drying, non-grain raising stain. For use as a finish toner, simply add the dye concentrate to shellac, water-base finishes, solvent lacquers, and catalyzed varnish or lacquers.

All colors are intermixable to produce custom shades.

Ideal for tinting woodworking glues, touch up and repair work, and adjusting the color of pre-mixed stains.

Not intended for exterior use.

Thank you Jack,  It is a custom table built for a client to be used under a picture window to display tropies and special interest items.  It sits against the wall.  It is made of hickory cut in segments and edge glued together
The inlays are purple heart and the black epoxy resin poured into 1/4 inch deep grooves. It is then clear coated with several layers of lacquer and rubbed out.  I have it posted in my projects page and i think there is a link to a slide show showing it's build.    Yes it is glued together with titebond, and there is no wood fillers in it.    :)
Jack Haskins, Jr. said:

That is a beautiful table Jay. There's only half a table though. Run out of wood did ya???  lol Seriously, great, great work.

Jay Boutwell said:

Carol,  The dye is the one made for coloring plastic and fiberglass jel.  Most of the places that sell plastic products sell it as well as in some crafts stores.  Look for casting resin and in that area you might find it.  They may only sell the liquid transparent type but I have seen a limited assortment of the opaque stuff which is like a cream.  I get mine at "Tap Plastics" and get it in a small plastic jar.  It is strong and a little goes a long ways especially the black.  Crafts stores sometimes sell it and it use is for dying the casting resin and on occasions it is used for doing small enlay work where you do not want to use wood as the enlay.  The two black stripes in the table top and the tear drops is some of the resin with a black dye.  The other is purple heart.  This is on my photos and or project page as well as some other examples.  Take care and happy woodworking.
 
carol said:

Jay, tell me more about the dye you use pls. I can find the resin, np, but not sure what sort of dye to look for. Thx!


Hi Jack,  Black mold is pretty frequent here in the Pacific Northwest due to homes being built during the rainy season and then sheet rocked out before it has time to dry out.  I encounter it frequently in my business and have handled it by masking up and spraying it with a strong mixture of common bleach about 75% bleach to water.  That is the most frequent method of handling it in the construction trade here.  If it is real bad then it gets bleached and once dried a heavy coat of KILZ will seal the wood.  I am confident that you can handle the job of repairing your building after all you were involved in building it in the first place.  Should you need help feel free to contact me.  Enjoy your work and stay safe.
Jack Haskins, Jr. said:

I didn't even think about mold.  The guys who repaired the roof didn't say anything about it so maybe they didn't find any. I assume they would have recognized it if they saw it but you never know. I'll look it up to see what to look for and how to treat whatever I find. Thanks for that tip.  I have a little time. The wall and door are still usable. Plus, and I'm pretty excited, I'm having a bunch of lumber delivered today to replace most of a deck we have around an above ground pool. My son is coming over to help. He now has a 5 year old son and a 12 year old step-daughter. Looking forward to them having fun in the pool which is filling up as I type. It's about half way full now. It's 24' in diameter and 4' deep but in the middle we dug out two feet deeper so we can jump in. I have a slide to mount on the deck. Everything should be done this week sometime. There's about 2 feet around the circumference that you can walk. Then a drastic drop off to 6 feet deep. Looking forward to the work and the fun too. Getting older now though and MAN, I can feel it. Can't fight time though.

Thanks,

Jack

Mike Atencio said:

Jack, first off, if there is water damage, you may have black mold too. That's dangerous so wear a mask while you demo the old stuff out. Once inside the framing, take a look to see if there is mold. There are chemicals you can buy to kill it and then seal the wood to prevent it from coming back - or you can replace the wood, as you suggested. If you replace the framing and door jamb (if I'm reading you question right) make sure you have everything supported as you wouldn't want the roof to collapse on you. I'm guessing that the roof was well supported at the time you enclosed the building but now it may have weakened some due to the water damage. A couple of 4 x 4's should work as temporary supports until the framing is replaced safely. Ultimately, the big concern is black mold. Go online and read up about it BEFORE you do any work. The job will be much easier and your health will be better Hope this helps. Mike

Jack Haskins, Jr. said:

Speaking of door jams (and quite a bit more), Many years ago I enclosed our carport. I did it myself. I am not a carpenter but pretty handy and we (Dad, brother and me), did most of the work on the inside of a house Dad had built. They built a "shell" they called it. All the exterior stuff was done (windows, doors, siding, etc.). We (the three of us) did everything else. We did the elec. wiring (except for the box), sheet-rock, hardwood floors and carpeting, interior doors, all molding on doors and windows, flooring, heating duct, etc.). Pros did the plumbing. Anyway, I learned so much that summer it has been worth probably more than half my early education. Of course being about 14, I hated it. :) Anyway, with that type knowledge and whatever else I've done in life I enclosed my carport. This was about 20 years ago I think.  I looked up how to do things like frame windows and doors. But, we had roof damage resulting in water damage in the wall.  Now I need to replace the door and some of the wall beside it. There is a concrete foundation. I put bolts in the concrete when it was wet to attach the bottom board and added adhesive also.  Vinyl siding outside. Sheet-rock inside.  My plan with my knowledge (which is very limited) is just to take off the siding and sheetrock and replace whatever wood is bad and add a door. At this point when I start removing the visible stuff (siding and sheetrock) I don't know how much of the wall (2x4 studs) I'll need to replace.

 

I feel comfortable doing this but I know there is a lot I don't know that would make the job easier or more importantly I want a good end result. Picture a concrete slab and a roof that at one time was a car port roof. How would you put up a wall with a door? That's actually what I did and will be doing again once I get any water damaged wood out. I am pretty proud of the job I did originally. If it hadn't been for the roof damage that we didn't know about until enough water had seeped into the walls do damage there also, the room has been great. I did it like Dad did the stuff in his house. Whatever needed to be done that I didn't know how to do I got a book. This was pre-computer and internet times. It seems half even the full grown adults don't remember those days. I'll shut up because I'm beginning to feel old. Anyway, I feel confident with this project because I have a Kreg jig and I got a bottle of titebond III yesterday. What else do you need??? lol

 

Any help or advice from anyone is GREATLY appreciated. Internet site recommendations would be great.

 

Jack

They wouldn't see it because it is usually down low by the floor and they're up high on the roof. It's easy to eradicate and unless the wood has termite damage and the like, you probably won't need to change the lumber framing out. I would thermal wrap (barrier) the wall if you take all of the siding off and seal the wood, just to be on the safe side. I think you can use bleach to kill it, then let the wood framing dry out before replacing the new sheetrock and siding. If you're in a humid area like I am, it could take awhile for the wood to dry out. It keeps raining here in Louisiana, can't paint or anything affected by moisture. You can use a dehumidifier and make a tent if you're in a hurry. Anyways, as for getting older, I'm trying to restore an old Victorian that had a fire, then was gutted by thieves and left vacant for three years. I literally feel your pain every day. I've done 100% of the work myself replacing wiring, sheetrock, building new cabinets, installing doors and running new plumbing throughout the house. Outside had three trees that fell in the yard and on houses in the neighborhood (before me) so I've been clearing all that too, rebuilt the front porch roof and still have to sand all the floors and re-stain and seal them. Everything was done starting March 22nd until today except the floors. Those can wait. The wife wants to move furniture today and rearrange the bedroom - lucky me. Have fun with your deck project - post picture when you get done with the garage / carport so I can see before and afters. 

Jack Haskins, Jr. said:

I didn't even think about mold.  The guys who repaired the roof didn't say anything about it so maybe they didn't find any. I assume they would have recognized it if they saw it but you never know. I'll look it up to see what to look for and how to treat whatever I find. Thanks for that tip.  I have a little time. The wall and door are still usable. Plus, and I'm pretty excited, I'm having a bunch of lumber delivered today to replace most of a deck we have around an above ground pool. My son is coming over to help. He now has a 5 year old son and a 12 year old step-daughter. Looking forward to them having fun in the pool which is filling up as I type. It's about half way full now. It's 24' in diameter and 4' deep but in the middle we dug out two feet deeper so we can jump in. I have a slide to mount on the deck. Everything should be done this week sometime. There's about 2 feet around the circumference that you can walk. Then a drastic drop off to 6 feet deep. Looking forward to the work and the fun too. Getting older now though and MAN, I can feel it. Can't fight time though.

Thanks,

Jack

Mike Atencio said:

Jack, first off, if there is water damage, you may have black mold too. That's dangerous so wear a mask while you demo the old stuff out. Once inside the framing, take a look to see if there is mold. There are chemicals you can buy to kill it and then seal the wood to prevent it from coming back - or you can replace the wood, as you suggested. If you replace the framing and door jamb (if I'm reading you question right) make sure you have everything supported as you wouldn't want the roof to collapse on you. I'm guessing that the roof was well supported at the time you enclosed the building but now it may have weakened some due to the water damage. A couple of 4 x 4's should work as temporary supports until the framing is replaced safely. Ultimately, the big concern is black mold. Go online and read up about it BEFORE you do any work. The job will be much easier and your health will be better Hope this helps. Mike

Jack Haskins, Jr. said:

Speaking of door jams (and quite a bit more), Many years ago I enclosed our carport. I did it myself. I am not a carpenter but pretty handy and we (Dad, brother and me), did most of the work on the inside of a house Dad had built. They built a "shell" they called it. All the exterior stuff was done (windows, doors, siding, etc.). We (the three of us) did everything else. We did the elec. wiring (except for the box), sheet-rock, hardwood floors and carpeting, interior doors, all molding on doors and windows, flooring, heating duct, etc.). Pros did the plumbing. Anyway, I learned so much that summer it has been worth probably more than half my early education. Of course being about 14, I hated it. :) Anyway, with that type knowledge and whatever else I've done in life I enclosed my carport. This was about 20 years ago I think.  I looked up how to do things like frame windows and doors. But, we had roof damage resulting in water damage in the wall.  Now I need to replace the door and some of the wall beside it. There is a concrete foundation. I put bolts in the concrete when it was wet to attach the bottom board and added adhesive also.  Vinyl siding outside. Sheet-rock inside.  My plan with my knowledge (which is very limited) is just to take off the siding and sheetrock and replace whatever wood is bad and add a door. At this point when I start removing the visible stuff (siding and sheetrock) I don't know how much of the wall (2x4 studs) I'll need to replace.

 

I feel comfortable doing this but I know there is a lot I don't know that would make the job easier or more importantly I want a good end result. Picture a concrete slab and a roof that at one time was a car port roof. How would you put up a wall with a door? That's actually what I did and will be doing again once I get any water damaged wood out. I am pretty proud of the job I did originally. If it hadn't been for the roof damage that we didn't know about until enough water had seeped into the walls do damage there also, the room has been great. I did it like Dad did the stuff in his house. Whatever needed to be done that I didn't know how to do I got a book. This was pre-computer and internet times. It seems half even the full grown adults don't remember those days. I'll shut up because I'm beginning to feel old. Anyway, I feel confident with this project because I have a Kreg jig and I got a bottle of titebond III yesterday. What else do you need??? lol

 

Any help or advice from anyone is GREATLY appreciated. Internet site recommendations would be great.

 

Jack

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