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Will light sanding a gloss finish result in a satin look?

I want to put a satin finsih on a new table top and the varnish is described as a "hard" gloss. Will sanding it with very fine paper result in a satin look or should I just buy a satin finish? This varnish has great protection properties in it for table tops and thought it would be better than using polyurthane or laquer. Thanks for any help.

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I wouldn't risk sanding.  Apart from the obvious striations from the route the sandpaper takes, the level of pressure applied will also make a difference in the pattern.  IE, the edge of the sanding block, or the pressure from your fingers.

 

I think at the end of the day...it would simply look like you sanded it.  ;)

Thanks for responding.  I'll just use satin polyurathane which probably will be a better finish for a table top than laquer.

Geoff Simpson said:

I wouldn't risk sanding.  Apart from the obvious striations from the route the sandpaper takes, the level of pressure applied will also make a difference in the pattern.  IE, the edge of the sanding block, or the pressure from your fingers.

 

I think at the end of the day...it would simply look like you sanded it.  ;)

I agree with Geoff! I'd use a satin finish rather than sanding!
Gary, it really depends on what type of finish/medium you are applying your sealer to as to what kind of sealant you use; I say this because you mentioned both poly and lacquer.  I used to do a fair share of refinishing work  for hire and, I would be happy to help you choose the right sealer if you care to elaborate on the medium you used for your finish coat:-)  If unnecessary to advise, please accept my appologies for stepping in:-)  It is the motherly instinct in me, I guess!
Thanks Ralph. That's probably what I'll do. The varnish sounded like a good choice but really wanted a satin finish.

Ralph Sarc said:
I agree with Geoff! I'd use a satin finish rather than sanding!
I'm going to use an oil base stain and depends on a sanding sealer. I have a lacquer base sanding sealer but can't use poly on it, it says. That's why I thought of using a satin poly finish. Don't know if varnish can go over my sanding sealer or not.

TOMBOY said:
Gary, it really depends on what type of finish/medium you are applying your sealer to as to what kind of sealant you use; I say this because you mentioned both poly and lacquer.  I used to do a fair share of refinishing work  for hire and, I would be happy to help you choose the right sealer if you care to elaborate on the medium you used for your finish coat:-)  If unnecessary to advise, please accept my appologies for stepping in:-)  It is the motherly instinct in me, I guess!

You sound like you have done this process before perhaps but, just in case you have not; be very gentle in applying the sanding sealer as it will function very much like a polyeurothane and can run and can have a dripping appearance if applied too generously.  The sanding sealer is oil based as well in most cases and you will have to use polyeurothane or, an oil based lacquer.  The difference between the two is not only the very strong odor of the lacquer but, poly has a habit of yellowing over time and if not applied properly or, with enough coats and proper sanding between coats, flaking.  This is a pretty extreme situation however and most times does not occur but, is always a possibility.  I prefer to use a satin polycrylic for latex and water base stains due to the non yellowing and low/no odor and superior finish.  Using a good wood conditioner on your raw material is also a vital step, especially if staining...Anyway, probably way too much information:-)  I would use the lacquer if you have the option and deffinately a satin finish...just make sure you have plenty of ventillation:-) 

Thanks for your input. I like lacquer because it dries fast but thought poly would be more durable. I know both come in satin. There's a new sanding sealer I found that almost any finish can be used, unlike what I have. My sealer is old so maybe I should get a new one. Just would like to have a durable finish.

TOMBOY said:

You sound like you have done this process before perhaps but, just in case you have not; be very gentle in applying the sanding sealer as it will function very much like a polyeurothane and can run and can have a dripping appearance if applied too generously.  The sanding sealer is oil based as well in most cases and you will have to use polyeurothane or, an oil based lacquer.  The difference between the two is not only the very strong odor of the lacquer but, poly has a habit of yellowing over time and if not applied properly or, with enough coats and proper sanding between coats, flaking.  This is a pretty extreme situation however and most times does not occur but, is always a possibility.  I prefer to use a satin polycrylic for latex and water base stains due to the non yellowing and low/no odor and superior finish.  Using a good wood conditioner on your raw material is also a vital step, especially if staining...Anyway, probably way too much information:-)  I would use the lacquer if you have the option and deffinately a satin finish...just make sure you have plenty of ventillation:-) 

I love Minwax finishing products personally; I would absolutely not use Deft clear wood finishes and brushing lacquers...They are horrible!  Good luck in your endeavor, I'm sure it will come out beautifully!

Gary said:
Thanks for your input. I like lacquer because it dries fast but thought poly would be more durable. I know both come in satin. There's a new sanding sealer I found that almost any finish can be used, unlike what I have. My sealer is old so maybe I should get a new one. Just would like to have a durable finish.

TOMBOY said:

You sound like you have done this process before perhaps but, just in case you have not; be very gentle in applying the sanding sealer as it will function very much like a polyeurothane and can run and can have a dripping appearance if applied too generously.  The sanding sealer is oil based as well in most cases and you will have to use polyeurothane or, an oil based lacquer.  The difference between the two is not only the very strong odor of the lacquer but, poly has a habit of yellowing over time and if not applied properly or, with enough coats and proper sanding between coats, flaking.  This is a pretty extreme situation however and most times does not occur but, is always a possibility.  I prefer to use a satin polycrylic for latex and water base stains due to the non yellowing and low/no odor and superior finish.  Using a good wood conditioner on your raw material is also a vital step, especially if staining...Anyway, probably way too much information:-)  I would use the lacquer if you have the option and deffinately a satin finish...just make sure you have plenty of ventillation:-) 

Hello, Watco spraying laquer is the easiet spray finish I have ever used and it comes in an aerosol can, and I now use it all the time. If you want to knock down the gloss try using 0000 steel wool this works fantastic.  

Joe

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