Kreg Owners' Community

Does any body know where i could find a Low price , good quality ,compact Router for a beginner

Views: 1250

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I purchased a Ryobi trim router many years ago and find that I use it almost all the time for simple roundovers and other edges. Mine is battery operated, taking an 18 volt Ryobi nicad battery. I think the router was around 50 bucks, and was sold separately from the.  battery. 

I think this is a perfect beginner router without getting into a lot of money. It's quick change for the bits is great, and it's a very lightweight tool to hold and use. It controls easily and does the work of a big router, using the smaller bits. 

I'm not an elitist when it comes to routers, but I do also own a Makita 3/4 hp and a Craftsman 1 hp in a table. I never use them for small or quick projects, because the setup takes away from the joy of using it. I use my little Ryobi almost daily and have no complaints whatsoever. You can buy it at any of the big box stores that sell Ryobi tools. 

Kind of a cute little router, can be had for about $25 reconditioned here.  I wouldn't recommend it to anyone because I haven't got one nor do I know of anyone with one so I can't testify to the quality/performance. I also have not been impressed with the battery capacity of the Ryobi tools. I had a Ryobi 18V drill/circ saw kit. The saw couldn't cut two 2x4's when new. Maybe others have had better luck, but I cannot recommend something I wouldn't buy myself.

The other things that bother me about this add:

"The Ryobi ZRP600 is a Factory Reconditioned Trim Router. This trim router features corded power without cord inconvenience. This trim router can add the perfect edge for any project with the correct router bit and optional woodworking base. It has no load"

I have no idea what "no load" means. "optional woodworking base" ??? It doesn't indicate whether a battery or charger is included so I assume not.


twyla dorzweiler said:

I purchased a Ryobi trim router many years ago and find that I use it almost all the time for simple roundovers and other edges. Mine is battery operated, taking an 18 volt Ryobi nicad battery. I think the router was around 50 bucks, and was sold separately from the.  battery. 

I think this is a perfect beginner router without getting into a lot of money. It's quick change for the bits is great, and it's a very lightweight tool to hold and use. It controls easily and does the work of a big router, using the smaller bits. 

I'm not an elitist when it comes to routers, but I do also own a Makita 3/4 hp and a Craftsman 1 hp in a table. I never use them for small or quick projects, because the setup takes away from the joy of using it. I use my little Ryobi almost daily and have no complaints whatsoever. You can buy it at any of the big box stores that sell Ryobi tools. 

I initially invested in the Ryobi 18V cordless power tools, when undertaking a rehab project, that dictated cordless tools---drills, drivers, impact driver, angle drill, hammer drill, angle grinder, saw, caulking gun, palm router, chain saw, sawzall, brush trimmer, blower, vac, portable lights.

(Didn’t have access to electric power throughout the facility).

 

The cost of higher-end cordless tools, for this project, wasn’t justified.  It was to be a 6 week project that took 4 months--- (sound familiar?).

So, I figured, if these Ryobi inexpensive tools failed, I could return them for an exchange---they had a 90 day over-the-counter xhange---good deal to me at the time.  

 

I find these tools are very handy and useful for the DYI/homeowner tasks.

 

I’ve had my 18V Ryobi power tools, for over 6 years, and they’re still in good use.

Some, I use frequently and some occasionally.

 

For heavy duty use and long running time, the corded tools are the way to go.

 

Personally, the Ryobi 18V battery operated trim router, is great for edge trimming, and the like.

It comes in very handy when performing many simple and short tasks---

(I don't have to drag out the power cords or bring along a generator).

 

( I also have a Bosch Colt Palm router, that I use often in the shop.  It’s a great tool, it’s the way to go for performing routing tasks, using the smaller 1/4 “ dia shaft router bits).

 

The Ryobi 18V circular saw, will use up a fully charged battery to make a single rip cut of an 8 ft length of 2x stock.  (Having a corded heavy duty saw is the way to go).

A fine tooth blade is more suitable for cutting trim, and the like.

 

I use my portable tools enough, that it justifies having several batteries---

I have 4 of the Ryobi chargers and 10-12 batteries.  They all get used, when various tools are in the works---when the battery gets low, just change it out, and keep going.

 

On many job sites, portability is key, to being more productive.

 

HANDY TIP:  When starting out, and installing the first battery to start the task, put the second and subsequent batteries on the chargers, and have them fully charged and ready to ‘’load-and-go’’. ( Don’t wait ‘til the first battery is dead, before charging the second battery).

 

I label/mark my batteries in sequential order---ex: 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.

And the chargers A, B, C, D.

Start with #1, then go on to the next one.  Rotating the batteries, is the most efficient way to use them.  

 

If the Ni-Cad batteries are not used for an extended period of time, they’ll become dead/useless.

 

When storing batteries for more than a month, without use, drain the batteries.  They can be stored for several months, when drained.

 

When I get ready to use them, I put them on the charger, for at least an hour.

If they’re not fully charged, I leave them on the charger for another hour, allowing them to get back up to full charge.

 

I plug the chargers into an electric outlet strip and use a timer between the electrical outlet and the electrical outlet strip.  Set the timer for an hour, when the timed setting runs out, the electrical supply to the outlet strip will be disconnected.  This system setup will prevent overcharging of the batteries.  Over-charged batteries will overheat and premature battery failure will result.

 

I’ve been gradually upgrading to the Li-Ion batteries.  They recharge more rapidly and don’t have memory, so as to go dead and become useless.

 

As needs arise, I’ve been upgrading my battery operated tools, and investing in the Milwaukee M12 system tools. These are some great tools. 

The M12 offers features, no other battery operated tools offer.

The M12 Li-I battery run time seems to last longer than most 18V battery sources.

 

Works for me. 

Hi Ken - Good information. I think my problem with NiCads is lack of use. I only would need them for a few minutes every few days. I did try to run them down some to reduce the memory effect. I finally gave up and replaced a 9.6 volt DeWalt impact driver and my Ryobi kit with a Makita 18V d-lion kit, drill and impact, and have been much happier. I seldom used the circ saw so I didn't replace it. What I did notice about the d-lion, is there isn't much warning the battery is getting low. It seems to work full bore and then quit.

Thanks John.

I've experienced ni-cad batteries go ''dead'' and they wouldn't take a recharge, after they have been charged and then left setting ideal for over a month---my bad.

Some ni-cad batteries, I've had in use for a few years, by doing regular maintained service.

Some of the newer 18V Li-Ion bats are $100 each, and some even more---

very pricey.

Lithium-ion batteries have a longer run time---

when they get ''low'', they just stop---which is okay my me.

Infact, I like that feature.

Some tools at half the battery power are almost useless.

BTW---when using a right angle grinder, and using batteries with reduced storage capacity,

will result in the tool running at a lower rpm---

beneficial for some grinding & cutting operations.  

Ex like when using concrete surface grinding stones, sharpening stones, cutting wheels, and the like.

 

My M12 tools have a battery status indicator, right on the tool.

When the tool has only ''one'' indicator light ''on'', it's time to change to a fully charged battery.

When a fully charged bat is in the tool, 4 indicator lights are ''on''.

After extended use, it goes to 3 then 2---a nice feature that lets you know the status of the battery.

BTW---I try to make it a practice to recharge all my batteries, at the beginning of each month.

(Easier said than done).

 It makes it handier to have the chargers connected to an electrical outlet strip, or two, or three and all connected to a timer.  I generally do this in the evening, when closing up shop.

The following am, all my batteries are charged and ready to go.

Works for me.

Hi John, 

I initially purchased quite a few Ryobi tools after a burglary at my shop left me minus about 13,000 in name brand tools. SInce some of my subs and employees also use my tools, Ryobi was a great 'small' investment of battery powered tools, but I agree, the circular saw is not much to brag about. I seldom use a circular saw and have several, but never reach for the cordless ones, they simply don't hold up like a corded better brand model does. 

As I've 'grown' as a woodworker, I've found a personal preference for certain tools, for various reasons, mostly that I don't have gigantic hands, so most of the power tools on the market I have to test drive to see if I'll be able to use them over long periods of time. I buy according to what 'fits' in my hand without stress. For this reason I've gone to impact drivers and put all but one of my drills in storage (Ryobi makes a good one - I have two of those and a name brand one that eats batteries like a kid eats candy on Halloween). Batteries are systematically aggravating to me, but I like your system and have a similar one myself. Mine are wall mounted and always charging. I think I have six batteries now, and retire about two a year. I like the new Ryobi charger and larger ni-cad battery I bought recently with a weed whacker. The whacker was junk but the battery runs twice the time of the other nicads I have, and the charger shuts off when the battery is fully charged. I like that feature. 

This is such a great forum! Loving learning new tips, tricks and techniques from everyone! 

John Schaben said:

Kind of a cute little router, can be had for about $25 reconditioned here.  I wouldn't recommend it to anyone because I haven't got one nor do I know of anyone with one so I can't testify to the quality/performance. I also have not been impressed with the battery capacity of the Ryobi tools. I had a Ryobi 18V drill/circ saw kit. The saw couldn't cut two 2x4's when new. Maybe others have had better luck, but I cannot recommend something I wouldn't buy myself.

The other things that bother me about this add:

"The Ryobi ZRP600 is a Factory Reconditioned Trim Router. This trim router features corded power without cord inconvenience. This trim router can add the perfect edge for any project with the correct router bit and optional woodworking base. It has no load"

I have no idea what "no load" means. "optional woodworking base" ??? It doesn't indicate whether a battery or charger is included so I assume not.


twyla dorzweiler said:

I purchased a Ryobi trim router many years ago and find that I use it almost all the time for simple roundovers and other edges. Mine is battery operated, taking an 18 volt Ryobi nicad battery. I think the router was around 50 bucks, and was sold separately from the.  battery. 

I think this is a perfect beginner router without getting into a lot of money. It's quick change for the bits is great, and it's a very lightweight tool to hold and use. It controls easily and does the work of a big router, using the smaller bits. 

I'm not an elitist when it comes to routers, but I do also own a Makita 3/4 hp and a Craftsman 1 hp in a table. I never use them for small or quick projects, because the setup takes away from the joy of using it. I use my little Ryobi almost daily and have no complaints whatsoever. You can buy it at any of the big box stores that sell Ryobi tools. 

Just a side note on the Ryobi trim router...I would never recommend anyone use it on hardwoods. For that, the RPMs are just too low, but for pine and cedar, it does a nice smooth job. Don't know about the factory reconditioned ones - figured I was getting a pretty good deal on new at 49 bucks, so that's what I went with. I also have the corded Bosch trim router and love it as well. I use these tools almost daily, so I can definitely recommend both, but I think it matters what type of project they're being used on. Oak, mahogany and walnut definitely need a higher RPM router to do a good and safe job.  

twyla dorzweiler said:

Hi John, 

I initially purchased quite a few Ryobi tools after a burglary at my shop left me minus about 13,000 in name brand tools. SInce some of my subs and employees also use my tools, Ryobi was a great 'small' investment of battery powered tools, but I agree, the circular saw is not much to brag about. I seldom use a circular saw and have several, but never reach for the cordless ones, they simply don't hold up like a corded better brand model does. 

As I've 'grown' as a woodworker, I've found a personal preference for certain tools, for various reasons, mostly that I don't have gigantic hands, so most of the power tools on the market I have to test drive to see if I'll be able to use them over long periods of time. I buy according to what 'fits' in my hand without stress. For this reason I've gone to impact drivers and put all but one of my drills in storage (Ryobi makes a good one - I have two of those and a name brand one that eats batteries like a kid eats candy on Halloween). Batteries are systematically aggravating to me, but I like your system and have a similar one myself. Mine are wall mounted and always charging. I think I have six batteries now, and retire about two a year. I like the new Ryobi charger and larger ni-cad battery I bought recently with a weed whacker. The whacker was junk but the battery runs twice the time of the other nicads I have, and the charger shuts off when the battery is fully charged. I like that feature. 

This is such a great forum! Loving learning new tips, tricks and techniques from everyone! 

John Schaben said:

Kind of a cute little router, can be had for about $25 reconditioned here.  I wouldn't recommend it to anyone because I haven't got one nor do I know of anyone with one so I can't testify to the quality/performance. I also have not been impressed with the battery capacity of the Ryobi tools. I had a Ryobi 18V drill/circ saw kit. The saw couldn't cut two 2x4's when new. Maybe others have had better luck, but I cannot recommend something I wouldn't buy myself.

The other things that bother me about this add:

"The Ryobi ZRP600 is a Factory Reconditioned Trim Router. This trim router features corded power without cord inconvenience. This trim router can add the perfect edge for any project with the correct router bit and optional woodworking base. It has no load"

I have no idea what "no load" means. "optional woodworking base" ??? It doesn't indicate whether a battery or charger is included so I assume not.


twyla dorzweiler said:

I purchased a Ryobi trim router many years ago and find that I use it almost all the time for simple roundovers and other edges. Mine is battery operated, taking an 18 volt Ryobi nicad battery. I think the router was around 50 bucks, and was sold separately from the.  battery. 

I think this is a perfect beginner router without getting into a lot of money. It's quick change for the bits is great, and it's a very lightweight tool to hold and use. It controls easily and does the work of a big router, using the smaller bits. 

I'm not an elitist when it comes to routers, but I do also own a Makita 3/4 hp and a Craftsman 1 hp in a table. I never use them for small or quick projects, because the setup takes away from the joy of using it. I use my little Ryobi almost daily and have no complaints whatsoever. You can buy it at any of the big box stores that sell Ryobi tools. 

I purchased a plunge router yesterday from Harbor Freight. Was pleasantly surprised at how smoothly it operated. Went through the birch wood i was cutting like butter, soft butter. It was $59 & for $9.99 i got an additional return warranty. Even if youre upgrading they'll give you full $ back on it... I hope i stay as happy with it as i am now.

I got satisfactory results using the Ryobi 18V One+ ''trim'' router, edge dressing hardwood---

using small bits and making shallow passes.

Small jobs tasks and intermittent use.

Worked fine for me.


twyla dorzweiler said:

Just a side note on the Ryobi trim router...I would never recommend anyone use it on hardwoods. For that, the RPMs are just too low, but for pine and cedar, it does a nice smooth job. Don't know about the factory reconditioned ones - figured I was getting a pretty good deal on new at 49 bucks, so that's what I went with. I also have the corded Bosch trim router and love it as well. I use these tools almost daily, so I can definitely recommend both, but I think it matters what type of project they're being used on. Oak, mahogany and walnut definitely need a higher RPM router to do a good and safe job.  


Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

4" Dust Port for Kreg router table fence?

Finally installed a 4" dust collection system in my shop. I'd like to find a 4" collection port for my Kreg router table (PRS1045) fence. Anybody know where I can find such an animal or one that can be modified to fit?Thanks!Continue

Tags: port, collection, dust, fence, Router

Started by E M Hampton in Other Kreg® Products on Friday.

Kreg Circular Saw Track Guide Question

Hi all....Has anyone have experience using a Kreg circular saw track guide system for ripping long boards??? The boards would be 5 to 6 inches wide by 6 feet, I have a Bosch 4100 portable table saw. But ripping boards that length with a 45% angle…Continue

Started by Ed Anderson in Other Kreg® Products Oct 6.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 9 Comments

© 2022   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_