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I need to buy a new drill.  I am thinking of buying a corded drill as I have a lot of problems with batteries, either not charged when I need it or batteries that don't hold a charge.  I know that battery ones are more convenient, but........   Any suggestions as to what kind (Brand) to buy? What power is the best? 

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I bought a Bosh Li-ion at christmas time  came with 2 batteries its a 1/2 drill. The keyless chuck that actually works. I'm sold on bosch.


What model?

Milw offers several.


evan court said:

I use a Milwaukee and its a total beast.

Ni-cad batteries

Ni-cad batteries, when properly maintained, will last a long time.

The batteries need to be properly charged.

Having a minimum of two such batteries is the way to go.

 

When using the tool, insert the second battery in the charger, so as to have it fully charged, while the first battery is in use.

When the 1st one is discharged, put it into the charger and use the 2nd battery, while the first battery is charging.

Additional batteries may be necessary, if in demand.

 

Keep batteries charged.

Recharge the batteries at least once a month.

When the batteries are not used for 30 or more days, like when in long-term storage, drain the batteries down.  Then when needed, recharge the batteries.  The initial recharge may take a little longer, but it can be recharged.

Store batteries in a cool place.  (Elavated heat will destroy a battery).

 

Additional batteries may be needed for extended usage, like when drilling lots of holes or installing lots of screws, where two such batteries may not be sufficient.

 

Lith-ion batteries can be purchased separately to replace the ni-cads, as needs arise.  (Providing the OEM offers the batteries in both ni-cad and lith-ion, to fit the same tool.  (Ryobi offers this in their line of 18+One tools).

 

When I have 2 or more of the same batteries, I label each battery 1, 2, 3, 4, etc., and as applicable.   My chargers are label A, B, C, etc.

 

I’ve found it important to label the batteries, so that they are used evenly.

Keep the last battery, you’re using, in the tool.  Then when you proceed to your next task, you’ll know which battery was used last---then proceed to the next labeled/ charged battery.

The process will extend the battery life.  I have some batteries that have been in use for a few years.

When a battery completely fails, where it does not hold a charge, it is replaced with a lith-ion battery.

Label your new battery with the next higher ID number, so that you can quickly identify your newest  vs your oldest batteries,  Ex, when battery one dies, don’t reuse the formerly assigned number, assign a new number.

It’s also helpful to mark the purchase date, somewhere on the battery, in order to tell how long you’ve had it.  (Marking on the battery can be applied using an xtra-fine sharpen pen, or engraved).

(I engrave my tools, so that I know which ones are mine.  On a job-site, often times, others may have the same tool and batteries). 

 

When selecting a tool to purchase, buy the best you can afford.

If you’re a homeowner, beginner or novice DYI, and don’t use a tool often or everyday, it isn’t necessary to go out and buy the high-end tools.

OEM’s make changes frequently---the tools become OBSOLETE and you can’t get parts or get it repaired.

Good points Ken. In my (limited) experience, I've found that NiCad batteries haven't given the service that the Li-Ion batteries do, but it could be tool quality too. I had several B&D drills, always rotated batteries, one on charger at all times, but still ran into issues. I built a deck a couple of summers ago, (using the Deck Jig) and even though I was using fairly new batteries, and rotating between 3 batteries, there were times when I had to stop working and wait for the next battery to charge. I find the Li-Ion Bosch drill and driver I have now last longer, have more power and require charging far less often.

Ken Darga said:

Ni-cad batteries

Ni-cad batteries, when properly maintained, will last a long time.

Power Drills

Drilling in wood, requires a high-speed drill, so as to produce a smooth cut.  

 

(NOTE:  the larger diameter the bit--- the lower the rpm.  Consult with the drill-bit OEM for their recommended bit speed for the applicable drill-bit type and the type of wood being drilled).

 

Drilling pocket-holes--- Kreg notes in their instruction manual recommends 2000 RPM speed.

 

I use a corded drill, with the high- speed setting of 2000-2500rpm, for best results.

Acceptable results can be achieved, in some materials, using a cord-less drill with 1800rpm.

 

When shopping for a cordless-drill, select a quality product, with the highest RPM offered.

Derek,

B&D tools ARE-NOT of the quality of days-gone-by.

(Todays B&D drills are on the LOW-END at the big-box stores and the marts).

 

The best-buy and tools on todays market, for homeowner use, beginner and novice, are the Ryobi 18+ONE tools.  The kits are affortably priced and the way-to-go.

Their batteries are interchangable---ni-cad and lith-ion.

 

One of my sons purchased a Ryobi kit, about 15 years ago, when he got his first house, and those tools are still in use today.  One drill failed about 3 years ago, and the OEM replaced it---NC.

 

I have many cordless tools---some have ni-cad and some have lith-ion and some use both.

 

As the ni-cads are no longer chargeable, I replace them with the lith-ion.

 

My newer cordless tool purchases have been the lith-ion type batteries.

 

The next-step up are the Milw M12 tools.  More money, but the features and performance are top-notch.  (I put some of mine thru some torture tests).

For HD construction, the M18 performance is great.

(Other OEM’s have introduced cordless tools---some are good---some are okay---some are not my choice---and some...(no comment). 

(I don’t take my 22cal rifle on an elk hunt.  One of my sons uses his 357mag revolver on jack-rabbits and coyotes).

Derek Gould said:

Good points Ken. In my (limited) experience, I've found that NiCad batteries haven't given the service that the Li-Ion batteries do, but it could be tool quality too. I had several B&D drills, always rotated batteries, one on charger at all times, but still ran into issues. I built a deck a couple of summers ago, (using the Deck Jig) and even though I was using fairly new batteries, and rotating between 3 batteries, there were times when I had to stop working and wait for the next battery to charge. I find the Li-Ion Bosch drill and driver I have now last longer, have more power and require charging far less often.


Milwaukee M12 series is a great set of tools. The newer Fuel M12 are brush-less, so they work longer on a charge and are lighter. The M12 battery, that comes with the Fuel, are also a higher capacity then the older M12 drills and drivers.

An even nicer drill is the Festool line. The Drills are expensive, but you can get several chucks for them. Festool has a keyless jacobs chuck, right angle adapter, Eccentric chuck, Depth Stop Chuck and what Festool calls a Centrotec chuck.  All chuck are easy and quick to change. 

 I am a hobbiest. I do not make my living in wood working. If your that group . The price of $300 or more is high. I am happy with my $99 dollar Bosch lithium ion with 2 batteries with quick charger.

The only thing a $99 and a $300 have in common is the word, "DRILL".

C'mon, Ken, that's a little harsh. High-end tools are great to have, but for the most part there isn't anything they can do that you can't do with entry-level tools. If everyone had an unlmiited budget then the low-end tools wouldn't even exist, but they do. Most people start with cheaper tools, some graduate on to higher-end tools, but many are quite happy to tackle a few projects here and there with the tools they have. I've got some old B&D power tools that my wife bought me almost 30 years ago; better quality tools would have been nice, but I didn't know the difference, they all worked (still do), and if I thought high-end tools were a requirement I probably never would have afforded to get into woodworking in the first place.

Ken Darga said:

The only thing a $99 and a $300 have in common is the word, "DRILL".

Derek,

I'm not advocating buying a $300 tool where a $99 tool will be sufficient.

(Note the comments I've made earlier, under this thread).

Sorry folks Im not Ken But the best thing to do go out and get a skil or a B&D drill and see frist if wooding is your thing the drills Im talking about are about $30.00 I now that thay are not the high end drills but I have been building with B&D for ten years. And this drill is 7 years old and I have change the cord out 2 or 3 time's and if that isnt good for you look at my projects.

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