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In every shop there's a tool...No, not the person working in the shop, the actual tool itself.....and that tool, in that shop...is a hated tool. 

 

You see, It doesn't matter how expensive or new that tool is, or how shiny or sharp you keep it.  It doesn't even matter what colour or what brand it is.  You simply just...hate it.

 

For me, it's the Jig Saw.  And not just "A" jigsaw...THE jigsaw.  I've owned several.  From cheapy little black and decker toss-away's to mid-line Ridgid's and Dewalts, to higher end Bosch barrel grips and what have you.  I've spent countless dollars, on countless tools, making countless cuts for countless hours....and i've come to a conclusion.......

 

I hate Jig saws.

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Back about 36 years ago when my now 38 year old son was two and trying to fall asleep in his crib, my wife and I determined that using a screw gun (after I got home from work) to hang drywall was much too noisy. Obviously, that was long before Dewalt (and battery powered drill/drivers) ever existed. The answer was an old Yankee screwdriver that I got from my dad; tediously slow compared to todays "slam bam,..hang it man!" but quite quiet and effective. Still have it hanging on the tool board! Even actually USE it every now and then!!



Geoff Simpson said:
Ugh....my dad had one, it was also my granddads, i could never get the pressure correct to keep it in the screw.  A hateful tool if there ever was one.  lol

William Pearson said:

The old Yankee screw driver I have carried around since my Dad gave it to me long ago.

wPm

Did you think of checking if it was a "polarized" plug? You may have been trying to insert it the wrong way! Also, it looks like 16 gauge lamp cord; obviously undersized! Are you sure that you know what you are doing?? If it's not double insulated it will require a three prong plug with a grounding lug!!!    Hope this helps!!

Geoff Simpson said:
It's clear to me that the problem is with the power cord...A hammer that size requires 220V.  That being said, i believe that there's a cordless option available now ;)

Dave, This thing  was a garage sale item, One of them just have to have it items, make offer.    Geoff thought it might be a 220 volt one but that  might be just too much power for this thumb masher.  There is no owners or operaters manual with it.  There is no on, off switch or trigger control and no place for the cordless batteries so Geoff's cordless option idea probably isn't the answer.  There is no serial or model number on it so guess I'm out of luck for now.  At least it was not a gas operated one......................maybe some one out there has got a working one and can give the answer. 

Jig saws aren't all that bad until you mount them under a work table!

 

Have yoy tried the sears cordless multi tool. My wife bought me one. Whenever i try to use it to cut above my head the D!!!!! battery falls out. also just as you are almost finished with that cut the light flashes and it dies.

 

Thanks Steve Medley

 

I remember reading an article years ago about a totaly portable multi directional impact device that also came equipted with nail removing device attached. The Air force was paying 750.00 for a claw hammer, Geoff aren't you glad you didn't spend that kind off money on something you throw all over the place. {maybe they should also included capable of acheiving high speeds for short distances in their description}

Jay Boutwell said:

Dave, This thing  was a garage sale item, One of them just have to have it items, make offer.    Geoff thought it might be a 220 volt one but that  might be just too much power for this thumb masher.  There is no owners or operaters manual with it.  There is no on, off switch or trigger control and no place for the cordless batteries so Geoff's cordless option idea probably isn't the answer.  There is no serial or model number on it so guess I'm out of luck for now.  At least it was not a gas operated one......................maybe some one out there has got a working one and can give the answer. 

I don’t really hate any tools in my shop except my inability to use them effectly. I am sort of a latecomer to this because for most of my working years I lacked the time, space, money or tools to undertake anything serious, although I have built a workbench in virtually every house I have owned. Including one with a kiln dried maple top made from mill ends I could buy at the hardwood mill across the lake. Sorry I didn’t move that when I moved 1300 miles across the country, but it was very heavy and those moving vans just love heavy objects that don’t break easily.

 

My biggest challenge now is trying to saw two or four boards the same length with the table saw. Inside the line, outside the line or on the line I can’t seem to master. Maybe it is my trifocal classes. Maybe I need to upgrade to a laser saw. But, in my own amateurish way, I keep trying.

 

I just recently acquired the Kreg pocket screw jig, and have had a lot of fun, and  some success, with that. Good luck to all;  keep those fingers out of the way with any tool. I may be the only guy who ever got a busted lip from a jigsaw — when the blade caught and bucked the holding knob up to my mouth, which was obviously too close to the work.

ROY, from what I read you have that can do attitude, you will be just fine. When cutting multiple boards to the same length use the first board cut as the master, if you don't the boards will creap to a longer length as you progressively mark the lumber. Using a stop is another option. Set a stop at the length required and run each board out to it, they will be the same length. Be sure to put a short piece of wood where you load the boards on the saw, then when you move the bouar on the t slide it will not bind up on the blade. It also will help on jamming the blade.

 

Good Luck

 

Bill in Illinois

Roy Moses said:

I don’t really hate any tools in my shop except my inability to use them effectly. I am sort of a latecomer to this because for most of my working years I lacked the time, space, money or tools to undertake anything serious, although I have built a workbench in virtually every house I have owned. Including one with a kiln dried maple top made from mill ends I could buy at the hardwood mill across the lake. Sorry I didn’t move that when I moved 1300 miles across the country, but it was very heavy and those moving vans just love heavy objects that don’t break easily.

 

My biggest challenge now is trying to saw two or four boards the same length with the table saw. Inside the line, outside the line or on the line I can’t seem to master. Maybe it is my trifocal classes. Maybe I need to upgrade to a laser saw. But, in my own amateurish way, I keep trying.

 

I just recently acquired the Kreg pocket screw jig, and have had a lot of fun, and  some success, with that. Good luck to all;  keep those fingers out of the way with any tool. I may be the only guy who ever got a busted lip from a jigsaw — when the blade caught and bucked the holding knob up to my mouth, which was obviously too close to the work.

I think the secret to the jig saw is speed. Go slow. But the frustration! The blade can bend and suddenly you have a bevel. What sticks in my craw is laser lights. I have on on my jig saw. But if moves with the saw, so what good is it?  You can't aim for the laser line since if moves with the saw.  And does the blade cut on one side of the laser line or right down the middle? Like on my miter saw. Hard to tell how exactly where the blade is cutting. If the blade is centered on the line, then my measurements have to take into account my length may be off by 1/2 the width of the blade. I fail to see the benefit of a laser on a power saw.

Thank for the insight, Kevin, I’d never thought about that aspect of the laser. However, at my age (83) and with a recently acquire physical limitation, it is unlikely I will be acquiring any morenew shop “playthings.” May all of your projects yurn out perfectly, just as you planned. Roy


Kevin McNulty said:

I think the secret to the jig saw is speed. Go slow. But the frustration! The blade can bend and suddenly you have a bevel. What sticks in my craw is laser lights. I have on on my jig saw. But if moves with the saw, so what good is it?  You can't aim for the laser line since if moves with the saw.  And does the blade cut on one side of the laser line or right down the middle? Like on my miter saw. Hard to tell how exactly where the blade is cutting. If the blade is centered on the line, then my measurements have to take into account my length may be off by 1/2 the width of the blade. I fail to see the benefit of a laser on a power saw.
I haven't mastered a glass cutter yet, probably never will though I keep trying when I have to.  But I think the jig saw isn't so bad maybe because I expect it to be a rascal and clamp the work and work only with a fine tooth blade.   The tool I've had most bad luck with is a 2"brad nailer...alot of times the brads don't go straight, sometimes they go through & have gone clear across the shop and ricochet around a little... a few times, until I learned to keep on the back side of the gun, I've put a brad into my fingers while holding the work.  I don't need anyone to tell me how dumb that was.
Gene,  you make me glad I don’t have a brad nailer; I’ve had a couple of close calls with the table saw -- an index finger on one hand and thumb on the other — about two weeks apart. But nothing since, so maybe I  Iearned my lesson.

Gene Maiorano said:
I haven't mastered a glass cutter yet, probably never will though I keep trying when I have to.  But I think the jig saw isn't so bad maybe because I expect it to be a rascal and clamp the work and work only with a fine tooth blade.   The tool I've had most bad luck with is a 2"brad nailer...alot of times the brads don't go straight, sometimes they go through & have gone clear across the shop and ricochet around a little... a few times, until I learned to keep on the back side of the gun, I've put a brad into my fingers while holding the work.  I don't need anyone to tell me how dumb that was.

My favorite tool to hate is a stainless steel Shop Vac, of the best grade. It has great vacum, nice accessories, and does a great jop wet, or dry, and looks great, but, the steering system is suspect. It has three wheels, two large rear stationary wheels, one small front swivel wheel, and a beautiful stainless steel steering handle, that it is inpossable to steer the brute with. It staunchly resists any attempt to be moved in any direction, but up or down, and I have been tempted to test the down direction by throwing it down a flight of stairs, but, I suspect the hose would snag on something on the way down and keep it from going down.

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