Kreg Owners' Community

Views: 1343

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Being 135.00 is quite a chunk of change I spent 1.50, and got same resuts took the savings and bought screws  haha

Attachments:

Couple more shots one is my edge sander which is a 70's model

Attachments:

I'm enjoying the conversation here fellers, it is nice to hear from others who use the RAS!

I think those return springs are a good idea, and I'm pretty sure original saw includes them. They bought the old DeWalt castings and currently manufacture the cream of the crop of radial arm saws here in the USA.

I would submit though, that if the carriage is loose enough in the arm to allow the saw to feed itself through material by itself, the tension of the roller bearings should be adjusted!

As with any tool, spinning blades present quite a danger, and should be treated with respect. We all want to walk away at the end of the project with all our fingers intact, as well as a sense of satisfaction of having used tools we enjoy. 

Jason

Old Florida Woodworks

Jason my saw has been in family since day itws delivered to my dad and I never recall having a spring on it,I have original owners manual and the metal accs box with a bunch of factory goodies and nothing mentions return spring on mine

Jay,

I've seen those before, and it looks like it would work great. Is there one on each side of the saw, or just one?

Jens,

DeWalt didn't include return springs on their saws, at least on the consumer versions. Industrial versions may have included them, I'm not sure. I do know original saw has them, and I want to say I've seen them on Wolfe Machinery's website also.

That's a nice family heirloom to have Jens! I like your DIY return spring also. 

Thanks Yes I no ours did not have em

These were add on items made in the mid 70's and added as a safety device.  They were normally installed by the owner and on one side.  There purpose was to keep the carriage from sliding forward while the operator was loading lumber and or adjusting the lumber.  This is what happened to me it slid forward while I was adjusting lumber on the table for a cut and once it hit the edge of the lumber it went across the table climbing the lumber stock. I never installed one to the devices as at this time there were not offered as an after market feature.  I added two springs one on each side to hold the carrriage in its rearward postiton and then it required me to pull the carriage forward making the cut.  A short time after I altered the saw the after market return spring was introduced.  I recall several home builders used to use radial arm saws and used rubber tire chain tightners to do the same thing.  When I first saw them on their saws I though they were added to return the carriage after a cut was made to speed up the work of the operator.  I soon found out that they were there as a safety measure to keep the carriage from sliding forward by accident.
 
Jason Watkins said:

Jay,

I've seen those before, and it looks like it would work great. Is there one on each side of the saw, or just one?

Jens,

DeWalt didn't include return springs on their saws, at least on the consumer versions. Industrial versions may have included them, I'm not sure. I do know original saw has them, and I want to say I've seen them on Wolfe Machinery's website also.

That's a nice family heirloom to have Jens! I like your DIY return spring also. 

Jay I would still think that if the carriage moves that freely, an adjustment of the roller bearings is in order. It should take about 5lbs of force to move the carriage along the arm.

Another good tip is to make it a habit to park the saw behind the fence and switch the saw off when a cut is complete.

Jason
Old Florida Woodworks

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Pantry slides for heavy application

  Recently purchased two 96" tall pantry cabinets that are 23" deep that only came with two adjustable shelves and two fixed, (one at about 55" and one at the very bottom).  Shelf holes in the walls are drilled 2" O.C.  Like most store-bought…Continue

Tags: drawer, slides, pantry, pull-out, 75-Lb

Started by Paul Coon in General Woodworking Aug 11.

Miter Saw Recommendation 1 Reply

I’m looking to upgrade my miter saw. I’m willing to invest a good amount of money to get one with the precision pocket hole joinery requires. Would anyone like to offer a recommended model?

Started by Joe Racz in Beginners' Zone. Last reply by Scott Davison Oct 6.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 8 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_