Kreg Owners' Community

I am looking for input from anyone that has an opinion about the above table saw.  I have been using the boyfriends Delta Unisaw...which is a dream.  I am now looking to get a table saw for myself.  I have been looking at the Hybrid's.  They seem to be a good size.  Not too big and not too small.  The price seems fair and I have read mostly great reviews.  But...more information is always better.  I want this to be a one time purchase with no regrets.  Thank you in advance.

Views: 4291

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

The Scribed Lines, I referenced, are those performed by the person checking the square for squareness.

Scribe lines are made using a sharply pointed tool for marking (scratching) metal or wood.

A fine pointed tool (scribe) generally comes with a combination square.

Holding the square firmly in place. the point of the scribe tool is drawn “flush” and "tight against blade edge.

The result is a fine-line scribed on the surface.

Flip the square over and test it against the same line.

 

I place the point of the scribe into the scribed line, then slide the square so the blade touches the scribe tool tip.

Scribe another line over the first.

If both lines align, without any deviation, then the square is square.

For a closer examination, I use a magnifier.

The same proceedure can be used to check a carpenters square/rafter square, or the like, to check that it is square (one leg 90 degrees to the other).



Jay Boutwell said:

What scribed lines?????

Ken Darga said:

Stephanie,

Rockler triangle #33486---the 45-90-45 degree model.

It features very fine line markings.

http://www.rockler.com/woodworker-s-triangles

What make/model of combo square do you have?

Check it for accuracy, in all 4 diffent head positions.

(I've found some variations in some less costly models).

Place the combo square on a metal surface table---use a very fine scribed line.

View the scribed lines with a magnifier.  If the scribed lines do not follow the scribed line, then the tool is off, and you won't otain accuracy.

Starrett is the best---most suitable for the machinist and tool maker trades.

Craftsman machinist 12" combo is very good.

Stanley #46-123, die-cast handle (hi-vis yellow), 12" blade, made it England.  The best quality for contractor grade and home shop use.

That sounds complicated.  I bought a dial indicator.  I just need to make a base for it that fits in the miter slot of my Ridgid saw, need to true the blade with it all the way up and probably buy some blade stabilizers.  If all of that does not solve the problem....bring on the burn marks.  :)

Ken, I know what a scribed line is and how to make a scribe line as I have made many of them in my time building race engines and setting up milling machines to machine engine blocks and heads on.  I used "dykum" and a scribe line to make the reference lines to guide the milling and laying out engine blocks as part of the blue printing of the engine .
I did this as a profession  for 11 years and that is were I learned a little bit about setting up machinery which is far more complicated than a table saw. I was uncertain where the scribe lines were supposed to be drawn on and was hoping that they were not going to be drawn on the table saw.

 

To  set up as table saw that is only a little out of adjustment does not take a lot of time or alot of tools.

All that is needed is a long square, a short square and a dial indicator.  The first thing is to forget about the blade as for setting up the saw as it is teh unknown  as to  the accuracy of the blade's being flat or if it is cupped.  You lower the saw arbor down to it lowest part.  Using a short  square that will fit down into the throat plate area.  Place it against the arbor flange with the tongue of the square resting on the table.  Holding the square firmly in position raise the arbor using the crank.  Watch the arbor flange and it's position against the square.  It should raise smoothly and straight along the square's blade. If it is not true it will either move away from the square's blade or push on the blade.  If it pushed on the blade it will try to lift the tongue of the square off of the table .  It is important that the square is held firmly down onto the table  This is a quick and accurate adn easy way to determine if the arbor is lifting straight up or if it is tilting one way or the other as it is raised for different blade  cutting heights.  This gives you a good indication if the arbor is lifting up in a straight line.  Many of these need to be adjusted by using shims at the mountings.  This is important as the saw may accurate at the lower setting but totally out at the higher point.

 

Now that you are certain that the arbor is raising in a straight line, the next thing is to besure it is that the arbor is not off

90 degrees to the plumb and not bent.  To do this repeat the above steps with the square however rather than raising the arbor hold the square's long blade against the arbor flange (flat side where the blade attaches) and the tongue flat on the table top.  Hold down firm and while pushing in on the square and turn the arbor by hand and watch to see if it moves off the square.  If true it should remain flat against the square.

 

Now you have a base point in which to align the table top and the miter tracks. The first thing that needs to be done is to place a known flat blade on the arbor and tighten it up.  (If you have a big blade stabilize it is more accurate if you can raise it about the table top about an inch.  First check it for flatness by laying it on the table saw top if it is a flat surface but the better place would be on somehting like a piece of flat glass if you do not have an area such as a cast iron table top or the bed of a jointer or a planner.  If flat mount that on the arbor without the blade and raise the arbor to it expose at least an inch of the stabilizer.)

 

Then with a long square hange the tongue on the straight edge of the saw table with the long blade against the stabilize or blade, which ever is used.  I the table edges are at a true 90 degrees to the blade the square should be flat againt the stabilizer or blade.  Since it is most likely that the blade of the square is not long enough to reach across the width of the table top is is best to use the front of the table to square the top as the fence alinement may suffer from any in accuracy.    This will square the table top to the arbor.

 

Next it is time to check the alinement of the miter saw tracks. First mount a good flat blade to the arbor.  You should at this point in the proceedure be assured that the arbor is tracking correctly and the arbor flange in not bent.

Here the use of a dial indicator  set it up with a base in the track so that the base of the dial indicator is nearest to the track and the moving points on the blade side.  Thsi can be done using a piece of wood that fits the track and a long threaded rod such as a piece of "redi Rod"  one end can be fitted in a tight hole in the wood piece and depending on the configeration of how the dial head mounts to an base may or may not have the ability of clamping the indicator body to the rod.  With the indicateor mounted solid and the block having the ability to slide down the miter track set it up sop that the incidator tip is against the saw blade at a point a couple inches one way or the other from the center.    Zero out the indicator.  By hand slowly rotate the blade noting the movement of the dial indicator.  It should be close to 2 to 4 thousands.  This step has proven the flatness of the blade mounted on the arbor.  Sometimes refered to as the wobble althoght the looseness of the bearings and the arbor shaft drive train will add this as well as the flexing of the blade in rotation.

 

now move the indicator to a point 90 degrees or near,at the front and out towards the left side of the saw table.  Mark a tooth on the blade at the the beginning of the carbide,  set the dial indicator plunging point on this mark and zero out  the DIAL on the dial indicator. noting the reading to be zero.

Now carefully  slide the dial  indicator down the miter track and as the same time rotate the blade in the same direction to a point 90 degrees to the left and to the rear of the blade.  With the plunge point still on the same mark location on the same tooth, note the reading.  If it is zero the miter track is true to the blade

 

If not adjust the table to true it up.  Depending on what you do with the saw the miter tracks may not be as imprtant as the rip fence. 

Align the rip fence in the same manner only leave the rear of the fence open open about .002 to prevent binding.

 

Following this you should have the saw pretty well adjusted.  Some tinkering will sometimes help but remember wood will move in different ways and each move will alter the results of the cut in different ways.

 

 

 

As far as testing squares and percission tools I have my fair share of doing this too.  The best way to test the square is by setting the tongue (short end) on a straight edge and draw line ut the blade (long end) , flip the square over sitting the tongue end on the line and against the straight edge and draw another line.  The square is true if there is no second line and the line is not get wider at the other end of the square.  The results is like a photo of the difference.  So if the square in not true do you know how to make it true? 
Ken Darga said:

The Scribed Lines, I referenced, are those performed by the person checking the square for squareness.

Scribe lines are made using a sharply pointed tool for marking (scratching) metal or wood.

A fine pointed tool (scribe) generally comes with a combination square.

Holding the square firmly in place. the point of the scribe tool is drawn “flush” and "tight against blade edge.

The result is a fine-line scribed on the surface.

Flip the square over and test it against the same line.

 

I place the point of the scribe into the scribed line, then slide the square so the blade touches the scribe tool tip.

Scribe another line over the first.

If both lines align, without any deviation, then the square is square.

For a closer examination, I use a magnifier.

The same proceedure can be used to check a carpenters square/rafter square, or the like, to check that it is square (one leg 90 degrees to the other).



Jay Boutwell said:

What scribed lines?????

Ken Darga said:

Stephanie,

Rockler triangle #33486---the 45-90-45 degree model.

It features very fine line markings.

http://www.rockler.com/woodworker-s-triangles

What make/model of combo square do you have?

Check it for accuracy, in all 4 diffent head positions.

(I've found some variations in some less costly models).

Place the combo square on a metal surface table---use a very fine scribed line.

View the scribed lines with a magnifier.  If the scribed lines do not follow the scribed line, then the tool is off, and you won't otain accuracy.

Starrett is the best---most suitable for the machinist and tool maker trades.

Craftsman machinist 12" combo is very good.

Stanley #46-123, die-cast handle (hi-vis yellow), 12" blade, made it England.  The best quality for contractor grade and home shop use.

Jay,

Yes, I'm sure you know about squaring up and scribing.

I thought, perhaps, you asked the question, for the benefit of beginners and those who don't know.

I am a beginner.  A visual person.  This is all very confusing.  Like I said before, I have the dial indicator, need to make a base/holder for it...then hopefully be able to true up my blade without too much hassle, now that I know how to loosen everything up.  Always learning...  again I always appreciate everyone's help and advice.

Stephanie, I realized that it was getting complicated and that is the reason that I wrote a reply late last night.  What I wrote is the simplest method that I know of to aline up a saw completely,  It does not take a lot of the tools that have been mentioned in your post.  I knew that you had a dial indicator and you mentioned it in a prior post.  The method that I  have posted should be easy and take maybe 15 minutes unless you have to make adjustments.  What it does is give you a saw of which is aligned with the least amount of messing with it.  Not knowing your saw it could be that you may not need to perform all of these steps.  You have to be the judge of what you wish to do and need to do.  At least you have the steps to follow should you choose to do so.  The advise that I gave in my first post where I told you that the most accurate and easiest way to check the saw blade is using a dial indicator, and I still stand by it.

A table saw is a serious tool and one of the most dangerous and un-forgiving tool in the shop.  I cringe thinking of how easily and quickly that someone who is even experienced with them, can get hurt and seriously hurt.  That being said, that is why I have told you the steps to take to make sure your have a safe saw to work with.

Like I said before, I am available to answer questions, if you need my help.
 Stephanie H said:

I am a beginner.  A visual person.  This is all very confusing.  Like I said before, I have the dial indicator, need to make a base/holder for it...then hopefully be able to true up my blade without too much hassle, now that I know how to loosen everything up.  Always learning...  again I always appreciate everyone's help and advice.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Rip-cut ACS plunge saw

Just got a rip-cut and installed my Bosch saw haven't used it yet but saw was a good fit. Got the original ripcut and didn't really like it had trouble cutting straight. New one has several improvements should make it work much better. especially…Continue

Started by William Burt Brown in General Woodworking Mar 17.

Is the screw driver impact drill rater?

Is the screw driver impact drill rated?Continue

Started by Bob Naylor in Beginners' Zone Mar 10.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 4 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_