Kreg Owners' Community

Does anyone have any design plans or even just some photos of a corner lower cabinet? I'm building some cabinets for my cottage, and I'm not sure how to go about building the corner cabinet.

Views: 2406

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Derek, If you are talking about a lazy susan which is also a lower base cabinet I posted a long detailed story and photos to one Feb 06,2011 and Feb 07, 2011.  go to my page and type in Lazy susans in the search and you should find it.  This is a sample of what it is:  Permalink Reply by Jay Boutwell on February 7, 2011 at 1:04am                Delete

Justin, I have figured the panel sizes for a standard 36" high cabinet providing you are using a 3/4 " thick top and a cabinet without the seperate toe kick under the cabinet box.  If so adjust accordingly.  Also the measurments I gave you in the earlier diagram are correct however please note that this is finish measurments and not allowing for a face frame.  If you are using 3/4" face frame deduct 3/4 " from the  four red colored sections in the atached photo .  It is confusing so measurement should be 22 1/2 " on the floor where it says 23 1/4 ".  Then both end panels need to be 3/4 " less in width as you are adding the 3/4 " back in when adding the face frame.  You will also need to adjust the floor to match the other cabinets.  The one rear panel that is 36" wide in which ever one you have exposed to view after install.  This allows you to hide the end grain of the two end panels.

Thanks Jay; always helpful!

The plans that I've seen had the back corner angled, but I'd prefer to build the full box; and it makes the angles easier!

Do you use a full top? I can see what looks like a finished edge along the underside of the top in the pictures, or is that the face frame I'm seeing? I'm building frameless, so I'm thinking I will just put some 1.5" boards across the top of the front edges on both sides (as you suggested earlier with the cupboards).

So with these measurements you're able to use a 32" lazy susan?

Derek You can inset a full top is you wish.  What you are seeing is a self edge to the cabinet counter top.  The prinicpal is the same for either a face frame cabinet or a frameless cabinet.  To support the upper pole of the lazy susan assembly you can either use the countertop if is wood based however I use cross pieces to support the upper susan bearing.  Yes you can use the 32 inch susan pie cut .  Thes are sometimes called kidney shaped susan.  The one i use are from rev a shelv as they are independent trays and both shelves are supported by a bearing.  The shelves are adjustable on the pole and are self centering to the doors.
 
Derek Gould said:

Thanks Jay; always helpful!

The plans that I've seen had the back corner angled, but I'd prefer to build the full box; and it makes the angles easier!

Do you use a full top? I can see what looks like a finished edge along the underside of the top in the pictures, or is that the face frame I'm seeing? I'm building frameless, so I'm thinking I will just put some 1.5" boards across the top of the front edges on both sides (as you suggested earlier with the cupboards).

So with these measurements you're able to use a 32" lazy susan?

Derek, something I neglected to mention about the rear of the cabinet.  The one I have shown in the sketch and mock up is one where the susan cabinet back sets on one wall with the other cabinet back being exposed to public view.  This would be as if  a susan is being used to turn the angle and where part of it is being used to attach a bar. 

If you are building a lazy susan that is to go into a corner where there is a wall on each cabinet back , I would suggest that you clip the back corner with about about a 3 to 4 inch clip.  If the walls are not exactly square you will do your self a big favor by doing a clip. 

Because the susan trays are round you will have ample room in the back to enclose the clip using a rip of ply with 45 degree miter rip cuts the full height of the interior of the box.  This makes an absolute solid box without voids and prevents ants and or bugs from entering the cabinet.

Another tip is in installation, set the susan in the corner first getting the best fit on each wall and build the cabinet runs from the susan cabinet.

The doors situation is something to discuss as well.  The cabinets sketches from my post are for a wing door  (2 doors) however if you desire to use only one door then you can do this as well by changing the front cut angles thus omitting the 90 degree front opening.   If you do this then you will want to use a full round susan tray instead of the pie cut trays. The rest of the construction is the same for the box, 

Not to confuse you but some customers desire a angled 45 degree angle in the front and use a single door rather that a 90 degree corner.   Most of the cabinets I build are 90 degree ones and I stick to the 36 inch box size as it makes a nice looking door arrangement in the corner.  The only thing to remember in the 90 degree ones is in building the  doors.  On one door you have to allow for the door material thickness.  Example: one door which you should hinge to the cabinet should be larger of the two doors and the other door should be 3/4 inch less in width if you are using 3/4 inch stock. You can use piano hinge to hinge the two doors together and or you can use wing door hinges.  European hinges are best for frameless cabinet construction and especially this application.  My preference is either of these three hinge makers:  blum, salice, and grass. 

  I think I covered the door measurment difference in the drawings and mock up however any questions please feel free to contact me.   Be sure to look at the full post as it is lengthy.

Thanks Jay;

In my case the cabinet will sit in a corner, so I think I'll follow your suggestion and incorporate a clip back rather than try to fit it tightly into the corner.

Thinking about the doors; if I use two doors with a piano hinge, should both doors be cut short the thickness of the door (3/4")? I'm thinking that the doors would butt on the corner, with the hinge between them, so both would be cut short. I've attached a sketchup drawing to try and explain what I mean.

Attachments:

Derek if using the piano hinge the doors would be the same width providing that you get the exact openings in both cabinets.  When you do this you will have this large opening at the top and the bottom of the doors where they meet in the corners. This is because you have to cut the doors to be 3/4" less that the opening if you are using 3/4" stock.  You will however have to figure in the door overlay factor as well.   

 I use the European hinge on most applications and make one door larger ( the thickness of the stock) than the other and this way I get rid of the opening in the top and bottom.  It is complicated doing it this way and has to be very percise in fitting of the hinges.  My choice of using European hinge is because of the ability of adjusting the doors.  It is much simpler to use the piano hinge and less expensive too but you loose the ability to adjust the doors.  Both ways work well but  once you get the cabinet built, you will then be able to better determine what method you want to use. 
 
Derek Gould said:

Thanks Jay;

In my case the cabinet will sit in a corner, so I think I'll follow your suggestion and incorporate a clip back rather than try to fit it tightly into the corner.

Thinking about the doors; if I use two doors with a piano hinge, should both doors be cut short the thickness of the door (3/4")? I'm thinking that the doors would butt on the corner, with the hinge between them, so both would be cut short. I've attached a sketchup drawing to try and explain what I mean.

If you are going to use wood to build your cabinet as most people do, you need to decide which type of wood you are going to use. You can make a visit to your local lumberyard and seen which wood type you prefer keeping in mind your budget for this project. Most common type of wood used for this purpose are teak, cedar and oak.




Thanks again Jay; I wasn't sure what you meant at first about the hinges, but I was in the local Home Depot yesterday and saw what you meant about the lazy susan hinges. That is definitely the route to go.

You know, I wish I had paid a bit more attention when we did all that geometry in grade 4!  :-)

Jay Boutwell said:

Derek if using the piano hinge the doors would be the same width providing that you get the exact openings in both cabinets.  When you do this you will have this large opening at the top and the bottom of the doors where they meet in the corners. This is because you have to cut the doors to be 3/4" less that the opening if you are using 3/4" stock.  You will however have to figure in the door overlay factor as well.   

 I use the European hinge on most applications and make one door larger ( the thickness of the stock) than the other and this way I get rid of the opening in the top and bottom.  It is complicated doing it this way and has to be very percise in fitting of the hinges.  My choice of using European hinge is because of the ability of adjusting the doors.  It is much simpler to use the piano hinge and less expensive too but you loose the ability to adjust the doors.  Both ways work well but  once you get the cabinet built, you will then be able to better determine what method you want to use. 
 
Derek Gould said:

Thanks Jay;

In my case the cabinet will sit in a corner, so I think I'll follow your suggestion and incorporate a clip back rather than try to fit it tightly into the corner.

Thinking about the doors; if I use two doors with a piano hinge, should both doors be cut short the thickness of the door (3/4")? I'm thinking that the doors would butt on the corner, with the hinge between them, so both would be cut short. I've attached a sketchup drawing to try and explain what I mean.

Thanks Joseph; I don't know if I made it clear, but this is part of a kitchen reno for my cottage so I'm building all new cabinets. This is one of the last ones to be done. It's all being built with birch 3/4" plywood for the panel stock and 1x3 birch for the board stock.

joseph said:

If you are going to use wood to build your cabinet as most people do, you need to decide which type of wood you are going to use. You can make a visit to your local lumberyard and seen which wood type you prefer keeping in mind your budget for this project. Most common type of wood used for this purpose are teak, cedar and oak.




Jay; cabinet done, photo attached. I'll attach a plywood top when I put it in place. Thanks again for the advice.

Attachments:

Anytime Derek, always glad to help my fellow friends and woodworkers.  The cabinet looks quite good.  When you install the lazy susan you can attach the top of the susan tray to a cross piece just like you have done.  I could not tell in the photo if it was set correctly or not and you will know when you add the trays.  It is best to attack the pole to a strecher rather that the counter top as if you ever need to change a counter top you will not have to mess with the susan.

Congratulations are in order for you for taking on the large project. 

Derek Gould said:

Jay; cabinet done, photo attached. I'll attach a plywood top when I put it in place. Thanks again for the advice.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Replacing existing slides but cannot remove drawer front

The Kreg slides are made to work with new drawers before putting on the drawer front. In my situation, I cannot remove the existing fronts which means when reversing the jig to hold the draw, it’s at an angle. Not sure what I should do to make them…Continue

Started by Jay Homeyer in General Woodworking Apr 25.

Parts

The Clamp anchor screw broke on my mobile project center.  How can I acquire a replacement?Continue

Started by Jon J Howard in Beginners' Zone Apr 20.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 4 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_