Kreg Owners' Community

Hi everyone,   after feeling a bit more comfortable with power tools,  I finally ventured out and purchased a table saw.  I chose the Ridgid.  I have never used one so have been trying to learn as much as possible with books and videos at this point.  I have a family member that has told me that he does not want me to be intimidated by it but to learn to respect it.  He intends to pay a visit and give me some instruction on it's use which will be of huge value.  He does not live close by so I will need to cram a lot of info in a short amount of time.

I would love to hear how many here had their first experience with a tablesaw.  Did you learn at school?  Self taught?   Simply grew up around it's use?   Feel free to share any ideas and stories.  Keeping hands and fingers away from the blade goes without saying.   I think I am more worried that if I feed a board in the wrong manner, due to my lack of knowledge that I will set myself up for a dangerous kick back.  

Thanks in advance!

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Jason,

A. re ''the quality of the cut''---

> how were the comparisons made ?

> how does one conclude the cut quality was better with a Forrest blade ?

>what other OEM blades were they compared with ? 

>what cutting speed and feed rate ?

>blade tooth type and grind ?

>blade diameter ?

>blade tooth spacing

>rake angle ?

>gullet size ?

>what was the smoothness of the cut edge compared with ?--- naked eye?---  magnifier? 

is there a  "comparator" that was used ?--- like instruments for comparing a measured property of an object.

>what wood types ?---soft wood?---hard woods?---with the grain?---across grain?---solid wood---laminated?

>what samplings are available ?

How does a Forester blade improve the quality of the end product?

I'm interested in what criteria was employed and the results, before I shell out some big $$$ to go out a buy Forester blades.

Jason Watkins said:

For me, the advantage of the Forrest blade is quality of the cut, the quality of the product, the factory sharpening service, and the great customer service they have. It's a lifetime blade for me. I have heard good things about some of the Freud blades too. 

I will have to agree with Jason on this,  during the 25 years that I have been cutting wood as a profession, I have had the opportunity to cut about every type of wood available and made all types of cuts both diagonally across the grain, across the grain and rip cuts in different thicknesses and textures of wood.  This also includes man made materials.  During this time I have used about every blade that is on the market and as a result my favorite blade that out shines them all has been the Forrest blade.  I have some that are over 20 years old and have been sharpened many times and are still a high performance blade.

I have given most of the other blades away or they still hang on a nail in the shop and most likely will never see any life on my saws.  Name brands like systematic and freud,  have long ago given way to the forrest blade..  When you get blade run out of between .001 and .002 from every blade you get and mount it on a saw and use it in a production like situation and after several hours of use you still have the same run out readings it means that the blade will also be cutting the same quality through out your jobs.  When you get "glue up" cuts right off the saw it is also a testament to its quality.

The durability of the forrest is hard to beat as there have been times when I have build an entire set of kitchen cabinets out of not only oak. but hickory without the need of changing a blade.  I never had been able to do that with other named blades.

One of the most impressive things I have experienced in a forrest blade that you can mount a 40 tooth combination blade on a saw and cut everything from the hardest to the soft woods in a cross cut and get splinter free accurate cuts and then with the same blade do the same thing is rip cuts and never have to change the blade for a different tooth number  or tooth configuration.  This is true with plywoods as well.

In all my trim out and percission cuts I have a forrest blade on my miter saw for the same reason.

But here again I do this for a profession and therefore I need to use the best where some one else whom do not require the same cut quality might choose a less expensive blade.  It is true you get what you pay for and for my career in working wood  the forrest blade has never let me down.
 
Ken Darga said:

Jason,

A. re ''the quality of the cut''---

> how were the comparisons made ?

> how does one conclude the cut quality was better with a Forrest blade ?

>what other OEM blades were they compared with ? 

>what cutting speed and feed rate ?

>blade tooth type and grind ?

>blade diameter ?

>blade tooth spacing

>rake angle ?

>gullet size ?

>what was the smoothness of the cut edge compared with ?--- naked eye?---  magnifier? 

is there a  "comparator" that was used ?--- like instruments for comparing a measured property of an object.

>what wood types ?---soft wood?---hard woods?---with the grain?---across grain?---solid wood---laminated?

>what samplings are available ?

How does a Forester blade improve the quality of the end product?

I'm interested in what criteria was employed and the results, before I shell out some big $$$ to go out a buy Forester blades.

Jason Watkins said:

For me, the advantage of the Forrest blade is quality of the cut, the quality of the product, the factory sharpening service, and the great customer service they have. It's a lifetime blade for me. I have heard good things about some of the Freud blades too. 

Jay,

Thanks much for your inputs.

Good to get the facts from a professional wood worker, as yourself.

Getting a perfectly smooth cut, for edge joining, is my goal.

Well said Jay! As a semi-pro I too have found Forrest blades well worth the money. The same blade handles all my rip and crosscut needs. I only take it off to replace it with my Forrest Dado stack.

Ken my findings with Forrest blades have mirrored Jay's. I did not feel like typing a lengthy answer last night lol, so thank you Jay for taking the words out of my mouth. Talk about a polished cut! The finish is glass smooth!

Ken mine is a radial arm saw specific version of the Forrest Woodworker 1. It's an 8" 60 tooth carbide blade with a TCP grind. Though my saw is rated for a 9" blade, I use an 8" for the mechanical advantage it offers since my motor is only 3/4.

I would recommend to Rita to call Forrest and speak to Charles. Tell him your saw's make and motor specs (amps and horsepower) and what you want to do with it, and he'll make a recommendation for you. 

If price is the deciding factor, just get whatever you can afford now, but if you have a little more disposable income, you won't be sorry going with a Forrest blade.

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