Kreg Owners' Community

I am a beginner woodworker. Doing great so far. I am currently looking for a router. Now I need to learn to use one. What would be the best way to do this? Any info is appreciated.

Views: 3585

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Lube the router bit ''shank'', with a small amount of suitable lube---

just to wet the shank surface, before inserting it into the chuck/collet.

WD-40, silicon, gun-oil, a spray form of dry-lube, or the like.
The lube makes for easier removal.

Works for me.

When the router's locking collar is initially loosened, the flexible collet is still wedged between the threaded router shaft and the bit shank.  Even though at this point the locking nut spins freely, I still have to loosen the nut a few turns further.  Then the nut needs the wrenches again, so that the locking collet is pulled away from the bit shank.  Once I do this, the bit falls out easily. 

I never needed to lube the bit shank.  Just "double wrench" the router bits to remove them.  This way is safer.

Hi Ken - I agree with Doug, if the bit is difficult to remove something else is wrong. dirt, defective/deformed collet, rust on shank or collet, shank/bit collar bottomed out. If new to routers, the collet that Rick described is becoming more prevalent. It is a "self-releasing" collet and removing it is a two step process. Loosen the nut till it spins freely, continue loosening until it tightens up again then loosen some more with the wrench. The bit is not released until you get past the second stage loosening which will have some not familiar with the operation thinking there is a stuck bit when, in fact, this is normal operation.

Ken Darga said:

Lube the router bit ''shank'', with a small amount of suitable lube---

just to wet the shank surface, before inserting it into the chuck/collet.

WD-40, silicon, gun-oil, a spray form of dry-lube, or the like.
The lube makes for easier removal.

Works for me.

Hello Teresa, by now you have either selected a router or have a good idea as to what you are looking for.  From my many years of using a router I can't stress it enough about the danger of the spinning router bit.  The best advice I can give you is take control of the router and beware of the direction you point the router and do not lay it down while it is still running. Keep your work area free of other tools and objects.  Concentrate on your work and don't get distracted.  Do not remove the router from your work while it is still running.

Router safety begins from the moment you first pick up the router.  NEVER plug it in until you have installed your cutting bit.  Install the bit so that it bottoms out in the collet and then pull it out about 1/8 of an inch,  The reason for this is that the collet pulls the bit shank downward as it tightens.  Something I do is to use a small neuroprem "O" ring from a plumbing store that will fit inside the collet.  This allows the bit to set to be inserted and then the collet tightened.  Set up the debth of cut so your are not trying to cut the full cut in one pass.  Several light passes results in the best control and the best cutting results.  ALWAYS UNPLUG THE ROUTER WHEN CHANGING BITS.

Most "out of control accidents" with a router results from rapid entry of the bit into the wood and or moving the router in the wrong direction.  The best method of acheiving this is to set the router onto the work surface and with the bit not touching, turn on the router and then slowly introduce the wood into the cutting bit.  Now for direction of travel you move the rounter bit  in a direction that the bit rotation is entering wood against that of the direction of your router travel direction.

Example: you have a piece of wood lying flat in front of you.  You set the router on the work surface on the edge nearest to you. Turn on the router and slowly introduce it into the wood and move it in a direction of left to right and maintain a steady pace along the surface you wish to cut.  In this example lets say you desire to cut all the sides and both ends, such as would be done in a drawer front or a door edge for a profile cut.  To do this simply continue in the same direction left to right until you reach the end and then go straight up away from you and at the top then continue around the top side in a right to left direction to the end and then straight down toward you,  This has allowed you to cut a complete 4 sides in one easy direction .  The bit spins in a clockwise direction so at all time during this cut you have moved the router in a direction that has forced the cutting edge into fresh uncut wood by the direction you have moved the router.  It is the rim of the bits cutting edge that you have to consider when determining the direction you need to move the router.  The bit turns clockwise so you need to move the router in the direction that is introducing wood into the bits cutting edge against the direction of your travel.  Good example is a table saw you push the wood into the blade against its cutting teeth.

In the same example had you started at the top of the board you would move the router from right to left.   Here again you have accomplished the same thing.  Had you moved the router in a different direction than what I have stated you would be moving the router bits cutting edge in the same direction as your travel.  This is called "climb cutting" although it has its times when it must be used it is also a dangerous as the router can get away from you.

On a router table it is also the same theory, however you are now moving a piece of wood into the router bits cutting edge.   The prodeedure would be:  With the router table fence behind the bit, then the bit would be  between you and the fence.  The fence would cover the bits back edge leaving the cutting edge expose towards you.  To make this cut the direction of feed is right to left past the cutting edge.

Of inportance in router care is to keep the collet surfaces clean.  The shanks of the bits must be kept clean and do not in any case use a bit that is damaged.  Routers in the hands and their control will depend alot on the user preference as one that feels awkward is dangerous.  The "D" handle router base  offers great control however again may or may not fit the users hand and ability to move the router.  The "D" handle is great for control against torque in large routers however is awkward in many places you may need to use the router.  This is where many of the smaller routers such as the trim routers come in handy.  I personally prefer the 1/2" shank bits finding them to be more stable with less viberation during the cuts.  They last longer due to their mass and do not heat up as much as the 1/4" shank bits.  What ever your choice besure to use quality bits and above all always secure your work top a solid surface and  wear safety glasses.  Incidentally the use of the neuropean plumbing washer excells in router table use as it insures that the bit does not bottom out before you tighten it.  It helps to insure a tight bit without overtightening it and allows easier removal of the bit.  I hope this will simplify some of the router use to you.   My best to you in your woodworking career.  I'm sure you will excell in many projects.

I found out that if you use fore finger thumb method for router travel works perfect for handheld router. Put your hand out with thumb pointing to side of palm and take fore finger point forward. The thumb tells you where you place you bit on side of material and forefinger tells u direction of feed .So if you are doing a straight run you go left to right now if yo do interior picture frame rabbit you do same and you will notice direction.Just practice without turning on router.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=router%20direction%2...

Check with your local Rocklers And Wood crafters for classes.

Doug,

Lubing of the bit provides two things for me---

more easily bit removal ( lifting the bit out of the chuck)---

AND---

it provides a protective coating on the bare metal of the shank---

the coating reduces oxidation (rust) forming on the bit shank.

Oxidation causes interference---which increases resistance to insertion/removal of the bit.

When oxidation forms, it needs to be removed---using fine sand paper, an emery cloth, or scrubbing pad (3M scotch-bright).

Oxidation also forms on the inside of the router bit collet---which will cause interference.

The inside of the collet can be cleaned (oxidation removed), but it is more difficult to clean the inside.

Oils/salts from a persons hands and fingers gets on the router bit shank---

oxidation forms and needs to be removed.

I keep a silicone cloth on hand, and in my tool box(s).

I wipe down my tools, after handling them and putting them up.

Douglas Harwood said:

Hi Ken,

You seem like a very accomplished woodworker, please don't lubricate your router bit shanks.  If the bit is that hard to remove you may be bottoming out the shank or need a new collet or ease up a tad on the wrenches.

Have a good day,

Doug

Ken Darga said:

Lube the router bit ''shank'', with a small amount of suitable lube---

just to wet the shank surface, before inserting it into the chuck/collet.

WD-40, silicon, gun-oil, a spray form of dry-lube, or the like.
The lube makes for easier removal.

Works for me.

Fins---

I use a piece of ''leather'', to grip the cutting edge, so as to reduce the likely hood of getting cut.

Cut a piece of leather, the size to fit over and around the cutters, grip-it and lift out.

Works for me.



Fins59 said:

Another thing, be careful when removing a bit from your router. 

This happened to me once and never again....I was going to remove a straight bit so I loosened chuck and grabbed bit with my forefinger and thumb .  Bit was stuck and therefore did not move and the razor sharp edges on bit sliced my thumb and forefinger nicely.

That was on my 1975 Black & Decker model 7610 so the chuck apparatus probably isn't as smooth as when new.  I have 3 other Craftsman routers but for hand-held routing that Black & Decker is my go to machine.

I gotta check out those palm routers you guys are talking about. 

Jens,

When I've used your suggested methods, people around me thought I was giving them the ''finger'', 

or practicing my '''gun draw''.

As a result, I use the following, when using a hand-held router:

''counterclockwise'' when routing the ''outside'' edges, and

''clockwise'' when routing on the ''inside'' edges---

(birds-eye view or viewing the object from the top side).

Jens Jensen said:

I found out that if you use fore finger thumb method for router travel works perfect for handheld router. Put your hand out with thumb pointing to side of palm and take fore finger point forward. The thumb tells you where you place you bit on side of material and forefinger tells u direction of feed .So if you are doing a straight run you go left to right now if yo do interior picture frame rabbit you do same and you will notice direction.Just practice without turning on router.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=router%20direction%2...

Ken - Good idea on the leather.  Will try it for sure.

I picked up a Bosch Colt PR20 yesterday.  You guys "talked" me into it.  Looked at the Craftsman, DeWalt, and Ridgid.  Liked the Bosch the best.  Used it for about a half hour yesterday and can see that it will be getting a lot of use.  I can see where you would be tempted to use one hand while operating it.  But have to remember it's not a toy.

Seems like it would be good for free-hand lettering.  Might try that today.

 

Colt is a nice little router. I've had one for almost a year. It can into places the big boys can't and there are a lot of accessories available for it. I picked up the "installer kit" kit with mine and that included a tilt base, offset base, roller guides and and some other stuff I have yet to figure out. I also heard Bosch is coming out with a plunge base for it. Woodhaven already makes a plunge base for the thing but they want $350 for that alone

Fins59 said:

Ken - Good idea on the leather.  Will try it for sure.

I picked up a Bosch Colt PR20 yesterday.  You guys "talked" me into it.  Looked at the Craftsman, DeWalt, and Ridgid.  Liked the Bosch the best.  Used it for about a half hour yesterday and can see that it will be getting a lot of use.  I can see where you would be tempted to use one hand while operating it.  But have to remember it's not a toy.

Seems like it would be good for free-hand lettering.  Might try that today.

 

Fins,

Great choice.

Great tool!---for so many hand-held routing operations.

Great for free-hand lettering.

When using only ''one hand'' operation---exercise extreme caution, and make only very shallow cuts/passes.

I strongly urge using ''two hands''---one hand to grip the router, and the second hand to hold the base down.

Depressions are provided in the base plate for thumb or finger rest.

Larger base plates are available, that fit the Bosch PR20.

I prefer the larger diameter bases, for most operations.

A clear base is more helpful---when viewing some cutting operations.

The palm router table, offered by Rockler, fits the PR20 nicely---a great tool.

It's provided with a clear base and fence.

The dust extractor is very useful feature---just plug your vac to it, and ''suck-it-up''.


Fins59 said:

Ken - Good idea on the leather.  Will try it for sure.

I picked up a Bosch Colt PR20 yesterday.  You guys "talked" me into it.  Looked at the Craftsman, DeWalt, and Ridgid.  Liked the Bosch the best.  Used it for about a half hour yesterday and can see that it will be getting a lot of use.  I can see where you would be tempted to use one hand while operating it.  But have to remember it's not a toy.

Seems like it would be good for free-hand lettering.  Might try that today.

 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Pantry slides for heavy application

  Recently purchased two 96" tall pantry cabinets that are 23" deep that only came with two adjustable shelves and two fixed, (one at about 55" and one at the very bottom).  Shelf holes in the walls are drilled 2" O.C.  Like most store-bought…Continue

Tags: drawer, slides, pantry, pull-out, 75-Lb

Started by Paul Coon in General Woodworking Aug 11.

Miter Saw Recommendation 1 Reply

I’m looking to upgrade my miter saw. I’m willing to invest a good amount of money to get one with the precision pocket hole joinery requires. Would anyone like to offer a recommended model?

Started by Joe Racz in Beginners' Zone. Last reply by Scott Davison Oct 6.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 8 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_