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Hi All,

Does anyone have any suggestions for good miter saw blades (type, brand and/or tooth count)?  I am still learning and mostly working with 2x4, 2x6 pine.  The blade I have now splinters the wood at the end of the cut.  

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Well Justin I use a 60 teeth Diablo Dural purpose blade make some real nice egdes.Up to date I have ran 600 bf of oak and 1200 bf of plywood so that says somthing for it.

yes, look up Freud on Amazon... I like this one....Freud blade

I agree with Carlos.  I bought the Freud #LU91R010 60-Tooth blade to make finish-grade cuts with my 10" sliding compund miter saw.  I have used it mainly for cutting soft wood (northern select pine and poplar) and for cutting a little maple trim.  The blade does an excellent job.  It is designed for use in sliding compound miter saws and radial arm saws when crosscutting. I bought mine at my local Woodcraft.

http://www.freudtools.com/p-20-thin-kerf-sliding-compound-miterbr-n...

It has cut down on the splinters at the end of the cut.  I also use a piece of scrap pine, which is screwed to the fence, for a zero-clearance backer to the workpiece being cut.  I think that this also helps.

 

Thanks guys, I will let you know what I end up buying!

Miter saw blade

 

I use this one. So far glass smooth cuts and haven't used a backer board yet. Some technique involved with chipout, If you try to go to fast the best blade available will show some.

You didn't say but if you have a slider, you need to watch the hook angle.

Hi John,

I am just a beginner compared to you.   I understand that your 80-Tooth blade will cut smoother than my 60-Tooth will.  From what you wrote, I think that I may have been pushing the saw too quickly.  So that I can improve my work with my sliding compound miter saw, I have a couple of questions:

-> To avoid, or at least decrease, the amount of chipout at the end of the workpiece when slide crosscutting (e.g., a 1 x 6), I should push the saw through the workpiece slower (rather than faster)? 

-> To avoid, or at least decrease, the amount of chipout at the end of the workpiece when "chopping" (e.g., a narrow piece of trim, molding or board such as a 1 x 2), I should push the saw down through the workpiece slower (rather than faster)? 

-> I have been slide cutting both narrow and wide stock.  Will I get better results with narrow stock if I chop cut it rather than slide cut it?

-> Regarding hook angle, my #LU91R010 60-Tooth ATB has a hook angle of -5 degrees.  Your LU79R010 80-Tooth Hi-ATB has a hook angle of +2 degrees.  I was told that the -5 degree hook angle helps to pull the workpiece down and into the fence, so the #LU91R010 is safer for a beginner to use than a blade with a positive hook angle.  You say to watch the hook angle.  Would you please explain?

Thank you very much.

 

 

Hi Richard - Pulling or pushing shouldn't make much difference in the amount, it will make a diffence where. When pushing the sawblade is exiting the cut on the top so that's where any chipout would be expected to occur. Pulling it through is just the converse.

 As far as hook angle goes, anything 0° +/- 5° should be good, just don't want a 12 or 15° positive so it doesn't try to pull itself along.

The tooth geometry is what gives you the polished sides, HiATB is great for that. Your LU91 should give you a decent crosscut, Try slowing the cut down a bit.

 


Richard Sands said:

Hi John,

I am just a beginner compared to you.   I understand that your 80-Tooth blade will cut smoother than my 60-Tooth will.  From what you wrote, I think that I may have been pushing the saw too quickly.  So that I can improve my work with my sliding compound miter saw, I have a couple of questions:

-> To avoid, or at least decrease, the amount of chipout at the end of the workpiece when slide crosscutting (e.g., a 1 x 6), I should push the saw through the workpiece slower (rather than faster)? 

-> To avoid, or at least decrease, the amount of chipout at the end of the workpiece when "chopping" (e.g., a narrow piece of trim, molding or board such as a 1 x 2), I should push the saw down through the workpiece slower (rather than faster)? 

-> I have been slide cutting both narrow and wide stock.  Will I get better results with narrow stock if I chop cut it rather than slide cut it?

-> Regarding hook angle, my #LU91R010 60-Tooth ATB has a hook angle of -5 degrees.  Your LU79R010 80-Tooth Hi-ATB has a hook angle of +2 degrees.  I was told that the -5 degree hook angle helps to pull the workpiece down and into the fence, so the #LU91R010 is safer for a beginner to use than a blade with a positive hook angle.  You say to watch the hook angle.  Would you please explain?

Thank you very much.

 

 

Justin,

I always use thicker saw blades when cutting 2x stock, or 1x boards---

either crossing cutting or ripping.  The performance is better.

16-24 tooth for rough cutting and 40 tooth for a finer cut edge.

''thinner'' saw blades are fine for cutting thin stock, trim work and making shallow cuts.

There are blades labeled, ''miter saw'' blades, that are thin---available in 80-100 tooth, and great for cutting thin stock and trim work. 

The more teeth the smoother the cut.

NOTE:  thinner saw blades develop more wobble.

You may need to use ''saw blade stabilizers'', to reduce/eliminate the wobble.

Saw blade stabilizers virtually eliminates rim vibration to make cleaner, straighter cuts and extend the life of your saw blades.  It also helps eliminate distracting noise caused by vibration during cutting.

They're intended to be used on stationary saws only, that have a adequate arbor length, to accommodate the saw blade and the stabilizers.

I probably should have posted this earlier. It's a pretty decent blog on factors to consider, Selecting a saw blade

There is nothing wrong with a thin kerf blade, Actually many saws <2 hp, and vitrually all direct drive universal motor saws, benefit from the 30% or so lower power requirements as opposed to a full kerf. Also, blade technology has progressed to where flutter and vibration are minimal providing the blade is not run full height on thin stock or some other operator issue. If you go to Freudusa.com>Industrial Blades and select any of the myraid of blades Freud offers, there will be full specifications including the material the blade is designed for and relative quality of cut depending on the material and type of cut as well as thickness of stock for optimum performance.

Just to address tooth count though, more is not necessarily better. It depends on the type of cut. Generally, a dedicated rip blade will likely offer the better cuts at something under 30 teeth. The reason is, fewer teeth allow for larger gullets which allow for more efficient chip clearance. A rip cut, defined as cutting with the grain, results in larger, stringy chips as the grain is more "rolled up" than cut. Most miter saw blades, intended for cross cuts will have 60 to 80 teeth but a chip from a cross cut operation tends to be much smaller than the long grain chips of a rip cut, therefore, a smaller gullet can be used.

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