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Okay, there's several types of saw blades available now days and decisions, decisions.... which is the right blade? 

About a month ago, I attended a woodwork trade show and seen several interesting blades.  There's the Frued Premier Fusion Blade, the Forrest Woodworker II and two that caught my attention was the Final Cut which had a sanding disc attached and Ridge Carbide High Performance Super Blade TS2000. Has anyone used these blades and what was your thoughts? 

I'm interested for a great quality blade for the table saw that you don't have to change out all the time. A blade that does rips, crosscuts, hardwoods like oak, plywood and of course pine.  I've used some blades in the past that were economical and did a decent job, but now I think it's time to step it up a bit. 

I'm especially interested in hearing from someone who has used the Final Cut or the TS2000, but would like to hear all comments as well. 

John    

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Hi Phil,

I'm surprised that there's not any responses to this topic. I thought I would be flooded with comments of people using various saw blades. I want to do my homework and ask this question so that I don't buy a blade that I'm sorry for. The two that caught my eye but I'm skeptical about are the Final cut & the TS2000. Take the Final Cut for instance, it can cut various types of material without chipping and have a fine finish. It has the sanding disc attached that will almost eliminate finish sanding. But..... How long does this disc last and does it really perform like they say. The TS2000 does amazing fine cuts too. So what blade makes you say wow, what a great blade.

To answer your question about the saw I want to use it on, it's the Jet Left Tilt 3-Horsepower 10-Inch Cabinet Saw. This has been a very good table saw for me and now I want to compliment it with a great blade.

Thanks for replying Phil.

John

Phillip said:
John:
Oddly the saw blade is one of those emotional issues and has a pile of emotional responses. I really do not know why, but it is real none the less. On my cabinet saw, I use a Frued Diablo I think a 60 tooth. It is a contractor grade and stays sharp for a long time. I have had mine for 2 years and had good results, clean cuts. I put a blade balancer with it and that made a big difference. I am of the opinion that like fishing lures catch more fishermen than fish, some woodworker tools sound better than they perform. I saw the Final Cut but I am skeptical of the continuous results. I have not proof, only and emotional response, and you know what that is worth (less). I have tried the Forrest blades and the Irwin blades. I think the Forrest are over rated and over priced. Oddly enough the Irwin blades were tested by one of the magazines recently and they rated high on value and performance.
You also do not mention if this is for a circular saw, chop saw, sliding miter, or table saw. The type of saw makes a big difference. My old contractor table saw never produced a decent cut no matter what I did. My Bosch 7 1/4" circular saw is OK and I am using a Matsushita combination, I also have a Irwin for change out. In my Bosch Sliding Miter I am using a Bosch blade, not for any other reason than that is what came with it. I will get a Frued Diablo for that saw as well when the time is ready for change. It has been my experience that each saw has its limit for what it can do, and that will affect the quality of the cut as well.I hope that helps a little.
Phil B.
Final Cut and TS2000? Forget it !!! That"s all marketing nonsense. I own 12 blade in all. Some came with saw purchases,and I don"t use them. You may need a Rip blade,cross cut blade and fine trime blade. It depends on the work you do. Then decide how manny teeth,what kind of teeth,and the design of the teeth. I"m a "blade changer",but that" me, If you"re looking for the "one blade" all I need i one,you"re in fantasy land. That being said,my suggestion:try the Freud Fusion,It may come close to what you"re you may be attenpting to accomplish.Your question requires lots of explanation: that may be why the responces are not as numerous,as you antisapated.See Dave at Peachtree.He offers a seminar on that topic,which goes into so much detail,I took notes,so I could remember everything.Getting educated requires work and determination on your part. Everyone has opions;you need the facts. Dave
These look like 10" Table Saw Blades, I thought this discussion is for 7.25" or 5.25"blades.

I am a "blade changer" too. Especially with the table saw. The best cut the table saw is designed for is "ripping.

The 10 inch sliding chop saw is best for cross cutting, against the grain of the wood.

My "best" experience is with a 10" Freud Blade on a table saw for cutting solid birch plywood. But be care careful the blades are so close that the speed can 'sometimes' burn the plywood. (It takes practice...)

Any one have a recommendation for a 5.25" all purpose saw that I use on mainly plywood pannels ?



DAVID CZUPRYN said:
Final Cut and TS2000? Forget it !!! That"s all marketing nonsense. I own 12 blade in all. Some came with saw purchases,and I don"t use them. You may need a Rip blade,cross cut blade and fine trime blade. It depends on the work you do. Then decide how manny teeth,what kind of teeth,and the design of the teeth. I"m a "blade changer",but that" me, If you"re looking for the "one blade" all I need i one,you"re in fantasy land. That being said,my suggestion:try the Freud Fusion,It may come close to what you"re you may be attenpting to accomplish.Your question requires lots of explanation: that may be why the responces are not as numerous,as you antisapated.See Dave at Peachtree.He offers a seminar on that topic,which goes into so much detail,I took notes,so I could remember everything.Getting educated requires work and determination on your part. Everyone has opions;you need the facts. Dave
Has anyone used the Freud rip-line blade for gluing up panels
Well in "My Opinion": I prefer the Freud Diablo Blades or the Forrest Blades. I just purchased a Freud Avanti 10" x 80T, and so far it works Great for Melamine, and Hardwood, even does Plastics. I use the Forrest Blades on my Old Delta 14" Table Saw, they work great, but a bit on the spendy side.
I use nothing but Diablo Combo Blades on my 12" Radial Arm for Long Rip Cuts.
I have some Fellow Woodworkers Here, and they are Using the "TS2000", and the "Final Cut", but so far No Fantastic Results...
On my 14" I have a Adapter for Mounting a Disc Sander, which really cuts down on time for Finish Sanding, But My Preference is still Hand Sanding, to avoid the Circular Sand Marks. I have some Old Stamped Steel Blades that have removable Carbide Teeth, those are Great, if your not worried about a "Thin Kerf"....
I'm a Firm Believer in Blade Balancer Plates too, so much so that I have had my Own Ones Machined just for my Blades.

John said:
Hi Phil,

I'm surprised that there's not any responses to this topic. I thought I would be flooded with comments of people using various saw blades. I want to do my homework and ask this question so that I don't buy a blade that I'm sorry for. The two that caught my eye but I'm skeptical about are the Final cut & the TS2000. Take the Final Cut for instance, it can cut various types of material without chipping and have a fine finish. It has the sanding disc attached that will almost eliminate finish sanding. But..... How long does this disc last and does it really perform like they say. The TS2000 does amazing fine cuts too. So what blade makes you say wow, what a great blade.

To answer your question about the saw I want to use it on, it's the Jet Left Tilt 3-Horsepower 10-Inch Cabinet Saw. This has been a very good table saw for me and now I want to compliment it with a great blade.

Thanks for replying Phil.

John

Phillip said:
John:
Oddly the saw blade is one of those emotional issues and has a pile of emotional responses. I really do not know why, but it is real none the less. On my cabinet saw, I use a Frued Diablo I think a 60 tooth. It is a contractor grade and stays sharp for a long time. I have had mine for 2 years and had good results, clean cuts. I put a blade balancer with it and that made a big difference. I am of the opinion that like fishing lures catch more fishermen than fish, some woodworker tools sound better than they perform. I saw the Final Cut but I am skeptical of the continuous results. I have not proof, only and emotional response, and you know what that is worth (less). I have tried the Forrest blades and the Irwin blades. I think the Forrest are over rated and over priced. Oddly enough the Irwin blades were tested by one of the magazines recently and they rated high on value and performance.
You also do not mention if this is for a circular saw, chop saw, sliding miter, or table saw. The type of saw makes a big difference. My old contractor table saw never produced a decent cut no matter what I did. My Bosch 7 1/4" circular saw is OK and I am using a Matsushita combination, I also have a Irwin for change out. In my Bosch Sliding Miter I am using a Bosch blade, not for any other reason than that is what came with it. I will get a Frued Diablo for that saw as well when the time is ready for change. It has been my experience that each saw has its limit for what it can do, and that will affect the quality of the cut as well.I hope that helps a little.
Phil B.
I'm kind of a "blade changer" too! I have certain blades for certain things but it also depends on the job at hand. My main table saw blade is a Ridgid 50 tooth combination blade and it does graet for most things. Most of my crosscutting is done on a miter saw and both of my miter saws have Makita 70 tooth blades. I work at a home improvement store so I was able to get an extra Makita blade for free from the Makita rep because I'm pretty sure they don't sell that blade anywhere. If I'm cutting 2x4's I swap to a Dewalt 40 tooth blade on the miter saw and if ripping 2x4's I put the Dewalt blade on the table saw. I did just score a 60 tooth Dewalt blade for $5 on clearance and have yet to try it out but it'll probable be my new 2x4 crosscut blade on the miter saw. I guess the moral to the story is to have a 50-80 tooth blade for clean crosscuts, a combo blade or rip blade for ripping and 24-40 tooth blade for 2x4's. Just my 2 cents worth in a nut shell.
you no what I would do is go to a cabinet shop that uses mostly cabinet saws and being they use them on daily basis . Just a suggestion cause everyone has different opinion and there are 100's to choose from
Phil Howard said:
I'm kind of a "blade changer" too! I have certain blades for certain things but it also depends on the job at hand. My main table saw blade is a Ridgid 50 tooth combination blade and it does graet for most things. Most of my crosscutting is done on a miter saw and both of my miter saws have Makita 70 tooth blades. I work at a home improvement store so I was able to get an extra Makita blade for free from the Makita rep because I'm pretty sure they don't sell that blade anywhere. If I'm cutting 2x4's I swap to a Dewalt 40 tooth blade on the miter saw and if ripping 2x4's I put the Dewalt blade on the table saw. I did just score a 60 tooth Dewalt blade for $5 on clearance and have yet to try it out but it'll probable be my new 2x4 crosscut blade on the miter saw. I guess the moral to the story is to have a 50-80 tooth blade for clean crosscuts, a combo blade or rip blade for ripping and 24-40 tooth blade for 2x4's. Just my 2 cents worth in a nut shell.

Hi, I use three blades. A 10" combo 40 tooth for most work, a 10" 80 tooth for fine stuff, and a 12" rip blade which has two internal planer blades built into it. Each costs over $100 so I'm very careful with them. Most of the timber I use is Jarrah, which is pretty hard timber, with a specific gravity of .8. It barely floats and has a lot of included resin which is tough on saw and planer blades. On the other hand, it is absolutely beautiful timber, it even turns well.

Theo
I have 3 Frued Fusion blades and think they are excellent on my 10inch Bosch contractors saw. I do some pretty good woodworking and this blade is just great. The finished cut edge looks like it just came off the jointer.
I ended up purchasing the TS2000 a little while back and have been using it to cut red oak and maple. I got a pretty good deal and figured I'd give it a try. So far, it's worked great and been happy with the results. I do plan on trying other blades as well, especially to see if there's a big difference and also to rotate them out from time to time. But I will say, after using this blade, I will not use a cheap blade again unless it's for cutting pine. It was money well spent.
I use a wood worker II for cuts on cabinet work the tooth count depends on what cuts I need to make.
And for other projects that do not need the fit/finish to be perfect I use craftsman blades.
I use the Forrest Woodworker II saw blade. I love the thin kerf and I also like that a blade stiffener comes with it as well. These are great blades and there are hardly any blade marks left on the side of a rip. Plywood is ripped with razor sharp edges. Well worth the money.

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