Kreg Owners' Community

Built with professionals and hobbyists in mind, the Kreg Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine is packed with features that will have you building with twice the speed and half the effort of a standard pocket-hole jig. 


With the all-new Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine, creating perfect pocket holes is extremely fast and easy. Simply pull the large control handle to start the powerful 110-volt motor, clamp your workpiece securely in place, and raise the drill bit through the table. This simple operation drills a precisely-placed pocket hole at the perfect depth in materials from 1/2"- to 1-1/2"-thick, while built-in dust collection keeps your work area clean as you work.


To ensure perfect pocket-hole placement, the Foreman features an adjustable fence that positions your workpiece for precise pocket depth, and pair of adjustable, spring-loaded stops that provide repeatable accuracy. Markings in the rigid, cast-aluminum table make it easy to position the fence for the three most commonly used material thicknesses: 1/2", 3/4", and 1-1/2".

Light-but-durable construction makes the Foreman perfect for use in the shop, around the home, and on the go. This hardworking machine weighs just 20 pounds and has a lockable handle for safe and easy transport. Even with this portability, the Foreman still features a large table to hold big boards and support pieces made from sheet goods. The table flips up to allow easy access to the motor and quick-change drill chuck, plus a built-in storage tray that keeps extra bits and accessories organized and within close reach.

On top of all of these great features, the Foreman is the first pocket-hole machine that creates all three Kreg Joint™ sizes: Standard, Micro-Pocket™, and HD (Heavy-Duty). The Foreman comes with the standard bit and drill guide, but you can easily switch to Micro-Pocket™ or HD any time you want to.

The Foreman’s innovative features make it possible for anyone—whether you are a professional woodworker, a hobbyist, a contractor, or a do-it-yourselfer—to create strong, tight-fitting pocket joints with the speed and precision only a Kreg pocket-hole machine can provide. And the Foreman does it at a price that’s easy to afford. Combine it all, and it’s easy to see that the all-new Kreg Foreman is your high-speed solution for pocket-hole construction.

Learn everything you need to know about the new Kreg Foreman HERE.
Retails for $399.99 (U.S.)

Views: 3693

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Kreg has had semi-auto pocket-hole drilling machines on the market for a few years.

Ex:

Foreman DB110 electric

Foreman DB55 pneumatic

plus others

https://www.kregtool.com/store/c26/pocket-hole-machinery/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruAGFjoNCp0

kp,

The guide marks, to align the fence, make for a drilled pocket hole, as close to 90 degrees as any other pocket hole drilling machine or jigs.

A pocket hole doesn't have to be drilled at a PERFECT 90 degrees.

The work-piece frame member needs to be cut square, to achieve a 90 degree joined member.


k p said:

The fence has 2 slots to adjust it. On the video it looks as if you could easily adjust it out of square.

I agree. There also seems to be a large gap between the fence and markings that could introduce parallax error in the setting. That would be more serious because the depth of hole and centring is very dependant on the wood thickness setting. A minor misalignment in perpendicular would not be a serious error but a wood thickness error could cause the joint to fail because over-drilling would leave insufficient depth between the screw head and edge of the work piece.

k p said:

The fence has 2 slots to adjust it. On the video it looks as if you could easily adjust it out of square.

I will say this is much superior to our stand alone jigs. Especially in regards to large panels much better support which should give better joints. Actually even narrow stock would have better support but not as critical .

Your are right Gary, and especially if you build one into a work bench.  I would do it in the middle of an eight foot long bench so the table surface it flat with bench. That way it gives you 4 feet before the boring of a sheet and 4 feet of run off.  The price of $400.00 is actually a fair price as it would become the main boring tool in a shop and speed up the process as well as being easier and especially for a panel. 

It really is a nice piece of equiptment.


 
Gary roofner said:

I will say this is much superior to our stand alone jigs. Especially in regards to large panels much better support which should give better joints. Actually even narrow stock would have better support but not as critical .

I have tested this machine and found that not to be a problem.  Like Ken said a pocket hole does not have to be bored exactly square to make a tight and square joint. it is the accuracy of your stock cuts that determine the joinery not the pocket hole.

 The fence on this machine is like any tool set up, you should check to see that it is properly set up.  Moving the fence is easy and quick to set up, but then also how often would you be moving the fence?  You set it up to bore the stock you are working with and when you change the stock sizes then you set it up to bore that stock.  Just like changing the setting on the jigs you have that is already on the Kreg Market.  Setting up the fence is easy to do with the marks and easy to check with a square using the edge of the table as the reference for the set up and lay it flat on the table and move the fence to square if you find it out of square.  It will take you no longer that 30 seconds to do this.  After me extensive testing of this machine my conclusion was that It is an excellent  tool and my years of experience proves this to me.
 
Brian Kelly said:

I agree. There also seems to be a large gap between the fence and markings that could introduce parallax error in the setting. That would be more serious because the depth of hole and centring is very dependant on the wood thickness setting. A minor misalignment in perpendicular would not be a serious error but a wood thickness error could cause the joint to fail because over-drilling would leave insufficient depth between the screw head and edge of the work piece.

k p said:

The fence has 2 slots to adjust it. On the video it looks as if you could easily adjust it out of square.

I though the idea was that the fence was set up with 3 detent for the three common settings ?

I will say this is much superior to our stand alone jigs. Especially in regards to large panels much better support which should give better joints. Actually even narrow stock would have better support.

I don't think they're detents, just markings on the table top.

Gary roofner said:

I though the idea was that the fence was set up with 3 detent for the three common settings ?

I was thinking buying a K5, but will go with this one as soon as I can save up the money.


Gary Nick Is correct they are markings on the table top.  Moving and adjusting the fence is an easy to do task and the marking are accurate.  It does not take a wrench to do this, all you need is your fingers to loosen the two ends of the fence and slide it to the markings on both sides and tighten.  Takes just seconds to do and if in doubt of the fence being accurate or if moving to drill a size in between any of the marks just use a square and move the fence to the location you want and tighten the fence ends.  Using a square, such as a framing square, check the fence using the table top as a reference.  Very easy to do and takes less than 30 seconds.
Nick B said:

I don't think they're detents, just markings on the table top.

Gary roofner said:

I though the idea was that the fence was set up with 3 detent for the three common settings ?

I think Craig took a real good well-built tool and made it look very very cheap by adding all all that plastic on there
I think the base is very cheap and the handles very cheap and I give it a thumbs down

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Pantry slides for heavy application

  Recently purchased two 96" tall pantry cabinets that are 23" deep that only came with two adjustable shelves and two fixed, (one at about 55" and one at the very bottom).  Shelf holes in the walls are drilled 2" O.C.  Like most store-bought…Continue

Tags: drawer, slides, pantry, pull-out, 75-Lb

Started by Paul Coon in General Woodworking Aug 11.

Miter Saw Recommendation 1 Reply

I’m looking to upgrade my miter saw. I’m willing to invest a good amount of money to get one with the precision pocket hole joinery requires. Would anyone like to offer a recommended model?

Started by Joe Racz in Beginners' Zone. Last reply by Scott Davison Oct 6.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 8 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_