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Hi, my name is Andy and live in Va.I am a master carpenter with 35 yrs experience building houses, decks, etc. I also build some furniture and cabinets on occasion. Don't have a fancy shop but still manage using basic tools plus some Kreg jigs and clamps. Latest job was shelves over cabinets. Used almost 150 kreg screws!

Hello, my name is Tony and I live in Nantwich, England. Like a number of other members I have been interested in woodworking for many years when time was available. Now I have retired I am starting to do a bit more when I can fight my way into the garage. Recently bought the K5 and just bought the HD set up as I have a suspended ceiling to install. Look forward to hearing from other more experienced people who have been there and done it

Gary, Hey neighbor! You're going to love it once you get used to using it. It saves hours off of building projects and they're stronger than traditional joinery, especially when used with Gorilla Glue. 

Gary Welch said:

Hello, My name is Gary and I live in East TX. I have been doing woodwork off and on over the years and have decided it is time to get back into it. I have not done much pocket hole joinery, always found it to difficult. Only recently purchased the Kreg Jig and ready to get started with it.

Mike,

What's the advantage of Gorilla Glue vs Titebond???

Mike Atencio said:

>>>... especially when used with Gorilla Glue. br/>

The use of gorilla glue is not the best glue for fine joinerey of such things as cabinets and most furniture.  It is too hard to contol the glue as it expands and sometimes even pushes the joint apart.  The better is a glue like titebond as it is easily cleaned up.  Gorilla glue is a polyurthane based glue that reacts to moisture and speeds up the cure.   Gorilla glue is a great glue for out door projects where moisture is a concern. 

 

Pocket hole joinery is not always the strongest joint to put in a project where there is alot of twisting or rocking motion such as would be expected in a chair or bench.  The mortise and tenon is still the strongest joint for such projects.  I also would not use the pocket hole to build the main structure of such things and bunk beds or any structure that is going to be exposed to an excessive amount of weight and movement.

 The pocket hole is a great joint for such items as cabinet construction as long as you can hide the joint,  It is the best method to build face frames and other butt joinery as the joint is fast to make but is only as strong as the bite of the screw into its mating surface.

 

 I am basing this on long years of experience

Thanks for the info Jay.


I was referring to the Gorilla Glue for wood. It doesn't foam and expand like it's darker colored version. As for joinery, I agree that for cabinets and the like where stresses aren't a concern, pocket screws work great. Mortise and tenon is the right choice except that it takes more time, different tools and skill to make these joints. Pocket jigs speed up the process for most projects unless you are building spindle chairs et al. I work with cabinets and the like. 


Jay Boutwell said:

The use of gorilla glue is not the best glue for fine joinerey of such things as cabinets and most furniture.  It is too hard to contol the glue as it expands and sometimes even pushes the joint apart.  The better is a glue like titebond as it is easily cleaned up.  Gorilla glue is a polyurthane based glue that reacts to moisture and speeds up the cure.   Gorilla glue is a great glue for out door projects where moisture is a concern. 

 

Pocket hole joinery is not always the strongest joint to put in a project where there is alot of twisting or rocking motion such as would be expected in a chair or bench.  The mortise and tenon is still the strongest joint for such projects.  I also would not use the pocket hole to build the main structure of such things and bunk beds or any structure that is going to be exposed to an excessive amount of weight and movement.

 The pocket hole is a great joint for such items as cabinet construction as long as you can hide the joint,  It is the best method to build face frames and other butt joinery as the joint is fast to make but is only as strong as the bite of the screw into its mating surface.

 

 I am basing this on long years of experience

Well the only gorilla glue that I know that will hold anything substancial is the foaming one.  The white gorilla glue is not used by me for the simple reason as on their own bottle they state:  "Not to be used on structual or load bearing" structures.  I know that titebond will work and does not have these restrictions.  I would not want to use an inferior glue to build anything when I know of a product that I know will do the job. 

 

If I read you comment correctly about joinery you sais traditional joinery and that includes mortise and tenon which is the traditional joinery.  I just wanted to be clear on what you were refering to. 
 
Mike Atencio said:


I was referring to the Gorilla Glue for wood. It doesn't foam and expand like it's darker colored version. As for joinery, I agree that for cabinets and the like where stresses aren't a concern, pocket screws work great. Mortise and tenon is the right choice except that it takes more time, different tools and skill to make these joints. Pocket jigs speed up the process for most projects unless you are building spindle chairs et al. I work with cabinets and the like. 


Jay Boutwell said:

The use of gorilla glue is not the best glue for fine joinerey of such things as cabinets and most furniture.  It is too hard to contol the glue as it expands and sometimes even pushes the joint apart.  The better is a glue like titebond as it is easily cleaned up.  Gorilla glue is a polyurthane based glue that reacts to moisture and speeds up the cure.   Gorilla glue is a great glue for out door projects where moisture is a concern. 

 

Pocket hole joinery is not always the strongest joint to put in a project where there is alot of twisting or rocking motion such as would be expected in a chair or bench.  The mortise and tenon is still the strongest joint for such projects.  I also would not use the pocket hole to build the main structure of such things and bunk beds or any structure that is going to be exposed to an excessive amount of weight and movement.

 The pocket hole is a great joint for such items as cabinet construction as long as you can hide the joint,  It is the best method to build face frames and other butt joinery as the joint is fast to make but is only as strong as the bite of the screw into its mating surface.

 

 I am basing this on long years of experience

Ken, Nice to meet you. I think it's a matter of choice. Both are excellent glues and have different products for specific jobs. I was surprised that many people thought Gorilla Glue only had the expanding glue but they have regular wood glue which I use. I do use the expanding glue for things that have a lot of space in them such as a kicked in door jamb which was splintered around the lock and up the frame. I used the glue on it and pieced the jamb together thinking it was a temporary fix but my house was attacked again and the same guy tried to kick the same door in. This time, the busted door jamb held and he was arrested because it took too long to break in. Gorilla Glue gets my vote just for that amazing outcome so, again, it's a matter of choice. I wouldn't use the expanding glue in a joinery though because it pushes the joint apart after you glue it. Regular Gorilla glue for wood working is what I use for cabinets and the like. Hope this clears the air a little. Mike

Ken Darga said:

Mike,

What's the advantage of Gorilla Glue vs Titebond???

Mike Atencio said:

>>>... especially when used with Gorilla Glue. br/>

Mike, in clearing the air, Like I stated in my reply back to you that you did not address about the gorilla glue.  I have a bottle in my shop that I do not use so know that there is a white gorilla glue however like i explained it even states on its own bottle that it is not to be use for "structural or load bearing" .  Does this not refer to it's strength? In woodworking most things are structual  I also know that it has a short shelf life and therefore more expensive than a glue that I know will work well.  The other statement that you made that I remarked about was that you said that the pocket screw joint was "stronger  than traditional" joints and especially if you used gorilla glue.  Since this is a learning site I  want to voice my point about the joinery and my opinion about the glue.  

Mike Atencio said:

Ken, Nice to meet you. I think it's a matter of choice. Both are excellent glues and have different products for specific jobs. I was surprised that many people thought Gorilla Glue only had the expanding glue but they have regular wood glue which I use. I do use the expanding glue for things that have a lot of space in them such as a kicked in door jamb which was splintered around the lock and up the frame. I used the glue on it and pieced the jamb together thinking it was a temporary fix but my house was attacked again and the same guy tried to kick the same door in. This time, the busted door jamb held and he was arrested because it took too long to break in. Gorilla Glue gets my vote just for that amazing outcome so, again, it's a matter of choice. I wouldn't use the expanding glue in a joinery though because it pushes the joint apart after you glue it. Regular Gorilla glue for wood working is what I use for cabinets and the like. Hope this clears the air a little. Mike

Ken Darga said:

Mike,

What's the advantage of Gorilla Glue vs Titebond???

Mike Atencio said:

>>>... especially when used with Gorilla Glue. br/>

thanks Mike for the welcome

Hi Everyone, My name is Damian and i'm a 30 from Australia. I recently purchased a Kreg jig and had a little fun with it already. I want to get a little more serious about building so can't wait to get some guidance from everyone here with a little more experience.

Looking forward to making discussions.

Cheers

Damo

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