Kreg Owners' Community

Anyone got a clue or built something like the wall cabinet in this picture? I am thinking that it will be made with a veneer covering a frame?

 

Views: 420

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

fiaberglass and make a mode out of 3/4 plywood or mdf.

You could use steam-bent wood that is laminated together for the ends. Then the top and bottom could be plywood or solid wood.

 

BTW, I like the clock of clocks, too.

 

 

In This Example:   Note the photo would be an end view of the oval you are building.  The angles you want would be cut on the sides and not as shown above. 

 

Using the stock you intend to use table saw 10 pieces at 9 Degrees on each side.  The example above is cut on the end    ( this would be an end view)   so use the stock the length  that you desire the debth of the finished cabinet, cutting a 9 degree angel on each side.  This makes one oval end.   Edge glue the 10 pieces together.  Once dry add straight stock by pocket screw to the cabinet ends.  Belt sand and use hand plane to round the corners off and sand out the inside to the desired shape. 

In the example above I used 10 pieces of 3/4" stock that was 1 3/8" long.  The results was a oval that was 8 3/4"  outside to outside.  If I used this it would result in a cabinet that would be 8 3/4 inches high.  So to get the cabinet height you want  you would add width to it in this case adding width to the 1 3/8  length .  You can also change the size by adding more pieces and changing both the angle and width.  It is best to experiment with scrap stock until you get the size you want. 

 An example:  by using 6 pieces of stock that is 7 1/2 inches long and an angle of 15 degrees the result would be a cabinet that would be  28 3/4" high.   Using the formula based on 180 degrees or 1/2 of  360 degree  (full circle) . Using the  number of pieces of stock you wish to use, figure the angle by 2 x's  the number  of sticks and divide that in 180 degree.  The result is the degree you cut on each side of each stick.  in the two examples above there is 10 pieces of stock,  a cut on each side would make a total of 20 cuts.  20 into 180 results is a degree of 9 to cut on each side.  In the other  example there is 6 pieces of stock making a total of 12 cuts.  12 into 180 is 15 making it a 15 degree on each side.  It is better to use greater numbers of stock as it results in less amount of detail sanding and planing on the inside and outside of the oval.  However remember that is more accurate to use an angle that is in whole number such a 9 degrees that one that is say using 7 pieces giving you a degree of 12 6/7 degrees.  Whole degrees result in higher accuracy.  

Alex do a web search on Bendable plywood.
Good job! Thanks for sharing. This is on my "to build" list now. 

Jay Boutwell said:

In This Example:   Note the photo would be an end view of the oval you are building.  The angles you want would be cut on the sides and not as shown above. 

 

Using the stock you intend to use table saw 10 pieces at 9 Degrees on each side.  The example above is cut on the end    ( this would be an end view)   so use the stock the length  that you desire the debth of the finished cabinet, cutting a 9 degree angel on each side.  This makes one oval end.   Edge glue the 10 pieces together.  Once dry add straight stock by pocket screw to the cabinet ends.  Belt sand and use hand plane to round the corners off and sand out the inside to the desired shape. 

In the example above I used 10 pieces of 3/4" stock that was 1 3/8" long.  The results was a oval that was 8 3/4"  outside to outside.  If I used this it would result in a cabinet that would be 8 3/4 inches high.  So to get the cabinet height you want  you would add width to it in this case adding width to the 1 3/8  length .  You can also change the size by adding more pieces and changing both the angle and width.  It is best to experiment with scrap stock until you get the size you want. 

 An example:  by using 6 pieces of stock that is 7 1/2 inches long and an angle of 15 degrees the result would be a cabinet that would be  28 3/4" high.   Using the formula based on 180 degrees or 1/2 of  360 degree  (full circle) . Using the  number of pieces of stock you wish to use, figure the angle by 2 x's  the number  of sticks and divide that in 180 degree.  The result is the degree you cut on each side of each stick.  in the two examples above there is 10 pieces of stock,  a cut on each side would make a total of 20 cuts.  20 into 180 results is a degree of 9 to cut on each side.  In the other  example there is 6 pieces of stock making a total of 12 cuts.  12 into 180 is 15 making it a 15 degree on each side.  It is better to use greater numbers of stock as it results in less amount of detail sanding and planing on the inside and outside of the oval.  However remember that is more accurate to use an angle that is in whole number such a 9 degrees that one that is say using 7 pieces giving you a degree of 12 6/7 degrees.  Whole degrees result in higher accuracy.  

I used the same method as Jay illistrates to build a floor clock. Only difference was that it was a little larger. To join the pieces together I used the biscuit method, (didn't have or know about Kreg back then). Very strong after assembled. . .
To smooth out the edges (depending on thickness), make yourself a good hardboard template and you can cut a clean facing to cap the oval without the angles showing with a top bearing flush trim bit.

I build many curved cabinet and other objects that require a number of angle cuts that are very hard to hold tight while the glue sets.  Often these are too small to use any type of mechanical fasteners and require the use of a band type of clamp to pull together and hold the pieces until the glue sets.

Here is a plain and simple trick for anyone whom is doing curved and angled glue ups.

What I have learned is that by taking a strip of laminate counter top material that will yeild a diameter of the inside

of your project.   Roll the laminate into a cylinder the same size as that you need and secure it in to the cylinder shape using a length of electrical tape going around the cylinder not down the seam.

 This gives you an inside core that will support the inside of your project.

Apply the glue to the glue surfaces of the project.  (I usually use tightbond original or on occassions tight bonds molding and trim glue) it has a fast tac and sets fast and strong.  Start fitting your pieces together around the laminate cylinder holding them together with masking tape or other easily applied tape just to hold them in place untill you have all the pieces applied together.  Then using the cheap plastic electrical tape pull of a long piece of tape and streaching it some apply it around the parts.  This will give you the clamp pressure to get a tight glue joint.  if the object is a full circle you will not experience a collapse inside to the project as the tape pulls the joints against it neighboring joint like the principal of the arch with the arch key.  In some cases you can add strength to the location where you apply the electrical tape by adding a short piece of wood to the inside of the laminate cylinder.  This will prevent the laminate core from crushing.

The results is a tight glue joint as the tape has a memory to return to it origional length therefore pulling the joints tight and holding them untill the glue sets.  You do not have to worry about the project sticking to the laminate core and glue does not stick to the electrical tape like it does to a band clamp.  Once the glue is set cut the tape and admire the tight joints.  Smile even more as you do not have the band clamp to clean up.

I have used this trick for years with good sucess allowing me to glue up some difficult shapes from semi-circles to full 360 degree posts.  This is useful in many custom cabinet pieces to making segmeted glue ups for wood turners making cylinder objects like bowls.  Just a trade trick gained from lots of frustration trial and error.  Hope it helps someone out there.

Thanks Jay, for the tips/how-to's.

 

Ken, Your are most welcome.  I enjoy being able to provide some information that might be of some help to others.  I have enjoyed reading your post also and have noted that you have aalot of valuable information that is of use also.  I have appreciated what you contribute here as well.  Thank you as well.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Need Help?

For Technical Support, please call 800-447-8638 or send a message. Reps are available Monday through Friday from 8am to 5pm CST. 

Videos

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Forum

Pantry slides for heavy application

  Recently purchased two 96" tall pantry cabinets that are 23" deep that only came with two adjustable shelves and two fixed, (one at about 55" and one at the very bottom).  Shelf holes in the walls are drilled 2" O.C.  Like most store-bought…Continue

Tags: drawer, slides, pantry, pull-out, 75-Lb

Started by Paul Coon in General Woodworking Aug 11.

Miter Saw Recommendation 1 Reply

I’m looking to upgrade my miter saw. I’m willing to invest a good amount of money to get one with the precision pocket hole joinery requires. Would anyone like to offer a recommended model?

Started by Joe Racz in Beginners' Zone. Last reply by Scott Davison Oct 6.

Product Reviews

New Kreg 720Pro

I saw the video Kreg put out for this new jig and had high hopes for it.

I purchased one today and am very disappointed with it.

First the docking station is extremely cheap. The plastic is pathetic. A Lego has more…

Continue

Posted by Duke Leon on February 15, 2021 at 9:00pm

Not Pleased With Pocket Hole Construction

Several months ago, I purchased the Kreg K4MS so that I could build the Lego Table as outlined on the companion "buildsomething" web site which exclusively uses pocket hole construction.  I have considerable experience with conventional…

Continue

Posted by Robert Ringel on September 17, 2020 at 1:48pm — 8 Comments

© 2021   Created by KregRep.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms of Service

_