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Can you use the Kreg to put together a hexigon box with the screws on the inside?

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I've had excellent results using a flush-cut hand saw, trimming off the ends.

I have not been awake long enough for a full cup of coffee yet but would a oscillating saw help to cut off those ends as well?  I purchased one last year while doing a kitchen remodel and found that it can be a handy little tool to have in your arsenal.

Rita,

Yes, the oscillating tool is a very handy for many tasks---
sawing, sanding, scraping and grinding.

I use mine on many building and remodel projects.


Rita Baske said:

I have not been awake long enough for a full cup of coffee yet but would a oscillating saw help to cut off those ends as well?  I purchased one last year while doing a kitchen remodel and found that it can be a handy little tool to have in your arsenal.

I do have an oscillating tool with my Bolt-on.  I have never used it.  I will have to see how that would work on a test piece.  Thanks for the idea. 
 
Ken Darga said:

Rita,

Yes, the oscillating tool is a very handy for many tasks---
sawing, sanding, scraping and grinding.

I use mine on many building and remodel projects.


Rita Baske said:

I have not been awake long enough for a full cup of coffee yet but would a oscillating saw help to cut off those ends as well?  I purchased one last year while doing a kitchen remodel and found that it can be a handy little tool to have in your arsenal.

Stephanie,
 
Before you go to the trouble of making the sled check the total height that your table saw will raise at the "0" or 90 degrees.  Mine raises 3 and about 1/8 inches at the max.   Some saws differ depending on the design of the trunion and mechanics of the saw.  The 60 degree is at the max that a 10 inch blade will cut in 5/4 material on the sled however it can be made thinner.
Also be sure that the 5 quarter material you are using is actually 1 and 1/4" thick and not over that.
 
Here is what I did:   For the bed of the sled, I cut a piece of melamine that is 5/8" thick into a rectangle that is 22 inches X 15 inches.  Make sure it has straight side and 90 degree corners.   I would suggest making it out of thinner material such as 1/2"  even 1/4" hdpe plastic.   This will allow you to have increased cutting depth.
 
With  the bed material squared up cut two runners out of a hard wood or red oak to fit the width of the saws miter tracks.  They also need to be just a small amount smaller that the depth of the miter tracks.   This is so they won't allow the bind the sled in the miter tracks These can also be some of the HDPE plastic. 
Lay the two runners in the miter tracks and center the sled's bed on top of the runners.  Use your saw fence to square them up to the tracks and attach them using screws with at least two in each runner.  Counter sink them to keep the top of the bed unobstructed.
 
Cut 4 pieces of 3/4 " plywood 22 inches long X about 3 1/2 inches high.  These will be for the front fence and the rear tie to hold the bed together once it is cut..
Attach the front fence to the bed using screws and counter sink these as well.  Attach this at the edge so it is 90 degrees to  the sled bed.  Attach the rear tie in the same manner.
 
Set the sled into the two miter tracks and raise the saw blade at a 90 degrees  (zero) and cut through the sled making a track from the front to the rear,  BE CAREFUL AND NOT CUT YOUR HAND AS THE BLADE EXITS THE REAR.  
 
Cut a 3/4 piece of material plywood or melamine that is about 8 inches wide and the width between the front fence and the rear tie.
 
Cut a 30 degree miter length wise.  This for the table to lay the 5/4 material on as you cut the miter.
 
Cut two test blocks of 60 degrees as shown in the photos and use these to set the table angle.  Using the saw cut made through the sled set the blocks on the angle table with the long points down. And aline with the saw kerf on the table.  Hold the test block against the table and move it until the miter angle matches the saw kerf in the fence and check it for 90 degrees.  Attach both sides with screws through the front fence and the rear tie.  The bottom of the angle table with the 30 degree miter should be flat on the sleds bed.  This set the angle to cut the desired angle of 60 degrees.   ( 90 degrees minus 30 degrees is 30 degrees)  Once this is done attach the remaining two 22 inch x 3 1/2 in high pieces to the front fence and rear tie.
 
Turn on the saw and slowly raise the blade and push through cutting the rear tie and the fence deeper.  Continue until you are close to the top of the saws ability to travel upward. This will be the total cutting ability.
 
Clamp a test piece to the angle bed and with the saw set at 90 degrees cut  it.
 
Cut a test piece and see it it cuts a miter all the way thought 5/4 material. 
Hopefully it will depending on the saws ability to raise the blade to the same amount that mine did.
 I cut through a 5/4 piece with a small amount left however this is a true 5/4 piece.  ( 1 & 1/4 inches)   With luck the 5/4 material you are using will be just a bit thinner.  This is why I suggest using a thinner piece for the sled bed.  Refer to photos:
                                                                                 
Photo to the left:  Showing the runners for the miter tracks of the saw table being mounted to the sled,
 
Middle Photo below shows the 60 degree test blocks being use to set the miter table,  Note the toe of the test block is on the edge of the saw kerf and the square is used to set the table angle.  It is correct when the test block is flat against the table and lines up at 90 degree with the saw kerf.  The square is verifying this.  Do this to both sides and secure the angle with screws through the fence and rear tie.   The photo directly below shows the 5/4 material cut with a 60 degree miter and the bottom  photo shows the material being cut. 
 
If you are still having problem cutting off the points on the miters I will see if I can not design another sled to cut those.  I was faced with the problem I would use a back saw and hand cut them.  That way I could control the cut.  Any way here it is.  It is not hard to build  and works great for me.   I cut several test cuts and no problem.
 
 

Hi Stephanie,  As promised here is a jig for cutting off the un-used miter points on the hexagon boxes you are making.  This is a quick to make table saw sled that allows you to cut the points off after the box is made. It is simple to build much like the one I built yesterday to cut the 60 degree miter.   With this one all you have to do is set table saw miter to 30 degrees and then set the sled on the saw table.  Set the hexagon box on the sled moving it to the cut off line clamp and run it through the saw.  Rotate to the next point and repeat the process.

Note that there is a stop block that can be adjusted to fine tune it to fit the material so that you have a nice cut where you want it.  I suggest leaving it a little long and using a sander to finish it for a smooth joint.

The sled is made using melamine for the sled.  The one you see in the photos is melamine on side with a wood veneer on the face.   Cut it sled size to suit your saw.  make the miter slide rails like yesterdays directions and sit it on top of the miter rails and use the Fence to square it up and attach with screws.  use a square and the saw fence to set the rear fence on the sled.  Here I used pocket screws.   Build the fence as pictured and add a rear sled tie and attach also with pocket screws.  Be sure to place the screws at a point where the saw blade will not hit them.  One assembled rotate the table saw blade to 30 degrees and cut through the sled making a cut.  Note on my sample the miter is cut to the right.  My saw tilts right so the only difference you need to make is reverse the hold down clamp and the stop and you are in business.  BEWARE AGAIN ABOUT THAT SAW BLADE CUTTING THROUGH THE REAR FENCE SO TAKE SOME PRECAUTIONS AND ADD SOME PROTECTION FOR THIS.  I SUGGEST A STOP BLOCK TO STOP THE SLED FROM MOVING TOO FAR TOWARDS YOU.

The photos should make the building of the sled simple and quick and can be made very little cost.

If you have questions please contact me.  Refer to photos:

Wow that is impressive.  It will take me a bit to read and understand this...with some help at home of course.  Being Fathers Day weekend and my daughter is graduating from College Monday, it probably won't be until next weekend that I get a chance to give this a try.  All of this is greatly appreciated.

Good job, Jay.

I like your tubular rest design, on the sled---nice feature.

Thanks Ken, It is just a method to push the sled through the saw blade with keeping the hands clear of the saw blade area.  The sled works slick cutting the ends off the mitered points and works with the hexagon assembled.
 
Ken Darga said:

Good job, Jay.

I like your tubular rest design, on the sled---nice feature.

Holy cow!  Yeah I remember this.  I am going to have to re-read this.  I am using a different table saw...but this was so useful.  How time flies and things change since I joined this group.  

There is another one  dated feb 22, 2011 entitled "turning corners in cabinet with angles"    (type into the search bar top right of page.)   Might be useful and in that discussion is a wall with cabinets.  These are hickory and these have not warps in them.  note the large 6 foot high doors.  These are the cabinets in the wall that has the glass show case which are also hickory.

Stephanie H said:

Holy cow!  Yeah I remember this.  I am going to have to re-read this.  I am using a different table saw...but this was so useful.  How time flies and things change since I joined this group.  

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