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As one of my next DIY projects I'm going to build an outdoor bench for my front patio.  I found plans for one on Ana White's blog and will likely use it as the template.  I plan to build it out of 2x4 and 1x pine stock staining it dark and then applying an exterior finish of some type.

That is where I am having trouble identifying the better or best finish to use.  Polyeurethane products I am finding are not exterior grade.  The bench will see a lot of morning sun and of course rain, ice, snow, etc. 

Suggestions?

Thank you,

Bryan Ebling

 

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If you r having problems with the weather then try building your bench out of some composits like trex or some azck decking then u don't need to stain or urethane

Hi Bryan - a good oil base stain should work fine for you. Spar urethane, ie Miniwax Helmsman and others, has the UV inhibitors that you need. Drying oils are also a good choice, tung oil is my favorite, takes several applications though. Jeffrey's suggestion for composites isn't bad except composites tend to absorb heat and are not real pleasant for a bench in direct sunlight.

Anyone use ''boiled linseed oil'' to treat and preserve wood, for exterior projects?

BLO is amazing stuff Ken - expensive though and somewhat hazardous in the flammibility aspect. I haven't used it as a topcoat though. Not sure what the UV resistance would be. It's basically a drying oil, soaks into the wood and hardens. You need to apply several coats at 15 minute or so intervals until it is no longer soaking into the wood and then wipe off the excess as it wont dry but turn gummy instead. Will take a couple of days to finish drying out and then the process can be repeated. I've used it on wood handles for garden tools and on dried wood window sills and things like that to rejuvenate the wood some before I prime and paint.

Ken Darga said:

Anyone use ''boiled linseed oil'' to treat and preserve wood, for exterior projects?

John,

Thanks for your reply.

John,

BLO doesn't provide UV protection.

 

I've treated many tool wood handles, using BLO---love it---makes for a nice finish.

 

I’ve refinished many old yard and outdoor tools, and some newer ones---

sanded and applied the BLO and they look great.

The tool handles, refinished in BLO, are less slippery than those coated with a poly---

like in axe and sledge hammer handles---reduces the risk of your hands slipping off the handle.

 

When refinishing, I generally thin the first coat of BLO ---2 parts BLO and 1 part mineral spirits,

so as to get a deeper penetration for sealing the wood.

After drying, I add a second coat of BLO. 

I’ve heard or read somewhere, that some have applied several coats of BLO.

 

Yes, I've learned to wipe down the surface, after a few minutes of drying, before applying another coat.

If left on too long, I've experienced a tacky surface.  

I also coat the metal surfaces of yard and garden tools with BLO, to prevent  oxidation (rust).

 

Re flammability---yes, BLO will smolder and then could ignite.

When using rags, or the like, they need to be hung outside to dry---

DO NOT store them indoors---

DO NOT put the oil soaked rags in an enclosed container---

it will start to smolder in a short time, and could erupt into flames.

Hadn't thought about thinning the first coat.. Good tip, thanks. 

BTW, I also use it to seal/finish MDF jigs and fixtures. A few coats of BLO, a light sanding and some Johnsons floor wax gives a slick, hard and durable surface. Reasonably moisture repellant also.

Ken Darga said:

John,

BLO doesn't provide UV protection.

 

I've treated many tool wood handles, using BLO---love it---makes for a nice finish.

 

I’ve refinished many old yard and outdoor tools, and some newer ones---

sanded and applied the BLO and they look great.

The tool handles, refinished in BLO, are less slippery than those coated with a poly---

like in axe and sledge hammer handles---reduces the risk of your hands slipping off the handle.

 

When refinishing, I generally thin the first coat of BLO ---2 parts BLO and 1 part mineral spirits,

so as to get a deeper penetration for sealing the wood.

After drying, I add a second coat of BLO. 

I’ve heard or read somewhere, that some have applied several coats of BLO.

 

Yes, I've learned to wipe down the surface, after a few minutes of drying, before applying another coat.

If left on too long, I've experienced a tacky surface.  

I also coat the metal surfaces of yard and garden tools with BLO, to prevent  oxidation (rust).

 

Re flammability---yes, BLO will smolder and then could ignite.

When using rags, or the like, they need to be hung outside to dry---

DO NOT store them indoors---

DO NOT put the oil soaked rags in an enclosed container---

it will start to smolder in a short time, and could erupt into flames.

Hi John,

Thanks for your reply and the tips.

Hadn't considered sealing MDF with BLO---

always have used ''Seal-Coat'', followed by paste wax, on some surfaces, (when necessary on some objects).

I experience that the ''seal-coat'' bonds the MDF fibers, on the cut edges, resulting in less chip-out.

Works for me.



John Schaben said:

Hadn't thought about thinning the first coat.. Good tip, thanks. 

BTW, I also use it to seal/finish MDF jigs and fixtures. A few coats of BLO, a light sanding and some Johnsons floor wax gives a slick, hard and durable surface. Reasonably moisture repellant also.


Hi Ken - I'm guessing you are referring to the Zinsser product. I used BIN, which is a pigmented version, as a primer on the kitchen doors I made as the frames were pine and the panels were MDF. The shellac makes a great sealer in case the pine had any pitch issues and it hardened up any fuzzies left from machining the MDF where a quick brush with a 320 grit sponge cleaned everything up. I do like the BLO for MDF jigs because it soaks in and hardens which gives the MDF a bit more abrasion resistance. Not sure shellac would add that particular attribute. It's more of a coating that could be worn through. I don't think it would chip off, I think the stuff would stick to JELLO.

Ken Darga said:

Hi John,

Thanks for your reply and the tips.

Hadn't considered sealing MDF with BLO---

always have used ''Seal-Coat'', followed by paste wax, on some surfaces, (when necessary on some objects).

I experience that the ''seal-coat'' bonds the MDF fibers, on the cut edges, resulting in less chip-out.

Works for me.



John Schaben said:

Hadn't thought about thinning the first coat.. Good tip, thanks. 

BTW, I also use it to seal/finish MDF jigs and fixtures. A few coats of BLO, a light sanding and some Johnsons floor wax gives a slick, hard and durable surface. Reasonably moisture repellant also.


Hi John,

Yes, Zinsser "Seal-Coat".

I use the BIN, as a sealer, on many projects, when a ''white'' sealer/primer is desired.

I'll have to try BLO on MDF---I have some fixtures on my project list.

Seal-coat does penetrate into the wood fibers.


John Schaben said:

Hi Ken - I'm guessing you are referring to the Zinsser product. I used BIN, which is a pigmented version, as a primer on the kitchen doors I made as the frames were pine and the panels were MDF. The shellac makes a great sealer in case the pine had any pitch issues and it hardened up any fuzzies left from machining the MDF where a quick brush with a 320 grit sponge cleaned everything up. I do like the BLO for MDF jigs because it soaks in and hardens which gives the MDF a bit more abrasion resistance. Not sure shellac would add that particular attribute. It's more of a coating that could be worn through. I don't think it would chip off, I think the stuff would stick to JELLO.

 

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