Kreg Owners' Community

I have been using my Kreg Jr. and it is amazing how strong the joints are but I have had trouble with the collar on the drill slipping. Too bad you didn't put a flat on the drill to give some more purchase for the set screw. Do you have any other ideas for me to try?

 

Thank you.

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YES IF YOU CANT FIND ANOTHER SET SCREW THAT WILL MAKE IT HOLD DO WHAT I DO.....JUST PUT A PIECE OF TAPE AROUND DRILL BIT AT THE SETTING YOU NEED ON BIT.DRILL TO THIS POINT AND STOP. SOUNDS STUPID BUT YOU DO WHAT YOU HAVE TO DO TO GET THE JOB DONE...CHUCK
The first thing I did with Kreg drill bit was to put a flat on it. I used a sliding guide on my grinder to do it
I have never had a problem with the collar moving. Are you sure you are getting it tight? I tighten the set screw about as tight as I can get it with the supplied allen wrench and I stop pushing on the drill the instant that the stop collar makes contact with the jig. If the set screw is not holding, I cannot see that a flat on the bit would help much as far as preventing the collar from moving along the length of the bit. It could be that I've just been lucky I guess, as I'm fairly certain that I have drilled enough pocket holes for this problem to have surfaced. I have three separate bit/collar combos that I use regularly, so I do not set the depth often, I normally just grab the bit that is already preset for the depth that I want. I'm not suggesting that you get more bits, only that this may be the reason mine holds it's setting (no wear and tear on the set screw).
I use a split depth collar from Lee Valley. It clamps the bit rater than relying on a single contact point.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=32244&cat=1,1...

Don
Thanks Don,

Those split rings look like they should do the trick even better than trying to put a flat on the drill. Will the collars fit so I can still use the depth gauge in the kit box?

Thanks,

Chris
You might want to try one of these collars before purchasing them. I bought a set (I don't know if they were from the same manufacturer but they look the same) from my favorite store - Woodcraft - and had to return them. The ones that I rec'd were very solid - no flex even though they are split. When attempting to use the very first one, the collar slipped. I re-torqued it and still had slippage. One more attempt and it was stripped threads. I tried another size from the set and got the same results. I ended up purchasing some collars from my local hardware store, albeit more expensive, but they work as they should - no slippage.
Chris,
I haven't had any problems with this particular brand at all. The OD of the collar might be a bit bigger,b ut not enough to impact usong the depth gauge on the jig. The socket on the screw is a different size than the Kreg collar so the wrench doesn't fit in the hole in the jig, but otherwise they work fine.

Don

Chris Clute said:
Thanks Don,

Those split rings look like they should do the trick even better than trying to put a flat on the drill. Will the collars fit so I can still use the depth gauge in the kit box?

Thanks,

Chris
John,
This is $10.00 pacific rim technology. I suppose it is quite possible to get a number of duds along the way. Perhaps tightening the collar before inserting the bit would confirm the clamping ability of the collar. You would want to do this often as the metal will fatigue.
Did you still end up with a split ring collar as opposed to the standard depth collar?

Another option would be to approach a good bearing supply house and get a quality single piece shaft collar as an alternate. I personally never cared for using a set screw on drill bit flutes. The Kreg supplied collar works, but is not the best design for this application.

Don

John P. Stombaugh said:
You might want to try one of these collars before purchasing them. I bought a set (I don't know if they were from the same manufacturer but they look the same) from my favorite store - Woodcraft - and had to return them. The ones that I rec'd were very solid - no flex even though they are split. When attempting to use the very first one, the collar slipped. I re-torqued it and still had slippage. One more attempt and it was stripped threads. I tried another size from the set and got the same results. I ended up purchasing some collars from my local hardware store, albeit more expensive, but they work as they should - no slippage.
Regarding the collar slippage.

Thousands of holes, wide variety of materials, not once a slip.

Being a HD Mechanic for thirty-three years, I've been around set screw applications bazillions of times.
Before you decide to grind a flat on your step drill, consider the following analogy. Would you rather
have a two hundred pound man wearing flat soled shoes stand on your foot, or a ninety pound lady
wearing high heels? It translates to psi in any event. The localized pressure of the set screw on a
curved surface results in a surprisingly high 'dig' factor spread over a tiny area. The collar doesn't
want to tilt because it has a large bearing surface. This is the lady in the high heels, who by now
has poked a hole right through your foot. When the man with the flat soled shoes takes his turn,
he applies a force of greater weight over a much larger area, and the resultant crush would be
painful, but not life-altering to your foot.

When you offer the drill bit to the jig, I suggest you have it stopped until inserted and centered, then
fire up to full speed before contacting the wood, feather the feed rate as you feel it pull in to the fiber,
back off a time or two to prevent plugging, and only make the contact as firmly as the minimum needed
to know the collar has met the jig. It is, after all, a guiding device, and not intended for shock or impact.
Pardon me if this is already your habit. Like almost anything in life, you need to develop a feel for the
application, and most things work predictably well. I also suggest that after the hole has been milled,
do not make additional plunges, these won't improve the hole, and without the resistance of the fiber
you began with, the impact to the collar could overcome it's designed stability.

Regards,

Art
Well it appears that I am not the only person to have problems with the drill stop as you can see if you read some of the other replies of what other people have done to correct the issue. I have since looked at the end of the set screw and it looks like the contact is more like trying to hold the drill in place with the end of a needle! I will try a new set screw first then try a new collar which I think Kreg should think about providing.

Art S. Hamilton said:
Regarding the collar slippage.

Thousands of holes, wide variety of materials, not once a slip.

Being a HD Mechanic for thirty-three years, I've been around set screw applications bazillions of times.
Before you decide to grind a flat on your step drill, consider the following analogy. Would you rather
have a two hundred pound man wearing flat soled shoes stand on your foot, or a ninety pound lady
wearing high heels? It translates to psi in any event. The localized pressure of the set screw on a
curved surface results in a surprisingly high 'dig' factor spread over a tiny area. The collar doesn't
want to tilt because it has a large bearing surface. This is the lady in the high heels, who by now
has poked a hole right through your foot. When the man with the flat soled shoes takes his turn,
he applies a force of greater weight over a much larger area, and the resultant crush would be
painful, but not life-altering to your foot.

When you offer the drill bit to the jig, I suggest you have it stopped until inserted and centered, then
fire up to full speed before contacting the wood, feather the feed rate as you feel it pull in to the fiber,
back off a time or two to prevent plugging, and only make the contact as firmly as the minimum needed
to know the collar has met the jig. It is, after all, a guiding device, and not intended for shock or impact.
Pardon me if this is already your habit. Like almost anything in life, you need to develop a feel for the
application, and most things work predictably well. I also suggest that after the hole has been milled,
do not make additional plunges, these won't improve the hole, and without the resistance of the fiber
you began with, the impact to the collar could overcome it's designed stability.

Regards,

Art
There is probably no right solution. I would happily agree with your footwear analogy on a standard shaft because not only do you get the concentrated "dig" where the set screw contacts the shaft, but you get a goodly amount of surface friction opposite the set screw.
I will stand with my preference to have the clamping force distributed around the circumference because I do not believe the "dig" into the flute of the bit is desirable, and the amount of surface area available on the opposite side is minimal relative to a solid shaft.

Don


Art S. Hamilton said:
Regarding the collar slippage.

Thousands of holes, wide variety of materials, not once a slip.

Being a HD Mechanic for thirty-three years, I've been around set screw applications bazillions of times.
Before you decide to grind a flat on your step drill, consider the following analogy. Would you rather
have a two hundred pound man wearing flat soled shoes stand on your foot, or a ninety pound lady
wearing high heels? It translates to psi in any event. The localized pressure of the set screw on a
curved surface results in a surprisingly high 'dig' factor spread over a tiny area. The collar doesn't
want to tilt because it has a large bearing surface. This is the lady in the high heels, who by now
has poked a hole right through your foot. When the man with the flat soled shoes takes his turn,
he applies a force of greater weight over a much larger area, and the resultant crush would be
painful, but not life-altering to your foot.

When you offer the drill bit to the jig, I suggest you have it stopped until inserted and centered, then
fire up to full speed before contacting the wood, feather the feed rate as you feel it pull in to the fiber,
back off a time or two to prevent plugging, and only make the contact as firmly as the minimum needed
to know the collar has met the jig. It is, after all, a guiding device, and not intended for shock or impact.
Pardon me if this is already your habit. Like almost anything in life, you need to develop a feel for the
application, and most things work predictably well. I also suggest that after the hole has been milled,
do not make additional plunges, these won't improve the hole, and without the resistance of the fiber
you began with, the impact to the collar could overcome it's designed stability.

Regards,

Art
I have never had a Kreg collar slip. The problem arose when attempting to use split collars with a drill guide system for dowels. I did buy single piece shaft collars, thus the higher cost. They work! I don't like to and don't use collars on my drill bit flutes either. Thanks.

Donald Burch said:
John,
This is $10.00 pacific rim technology. I suppose it is quite possible to get a number of duds along the way. Perhaps tightening the collar before inserting the bit would confirm the clamping ability of the collar. You would want to do this often as the metal will fatigue.
Did you still end up with a split ring collar as opposed to the standard depth collar?

Another option would be to approach a good bearing supply house and get a quality single piece shaft collar as an alternate. I personally never cared for using a set screw on drill bit flutes. The Kreg supplied collar works, but is not the best design for this application.

Don

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