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Do you build more projects in the Summer or Winter?

Do you have a heated shop?  An air-conditioned one?  Do you work in your garage or outside?  The type of shop you have probably helps to determine when you build your projects the most... so what is it?  Summer or Winter (and everything in between)?

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 I have a heated shop but no A/C yet so I am out there at 3 seasons.

winter where it is about 70 degrees and 40 outside

 

40 degree outside in the winter? Heck that sounds like spring time to me... LOL I'd be out side in flip flops and shorts, firing up the smoker for a long slow one... LOL

Brian,

Installing fans in a none AC'd building can be very effective, when strategically located.

Roof fans, gable fans and ceiling fans are effective.

 

Fan blade size is important.  

Look for models that move a large volume of air, so as to cool the room down rapidly.

2 and 3 speed or variable speed models are the way to go.

 

Thermostatically controlled ceiling and roof exhaust fans available on the market.

 

On initial entry into a ''hot'' room, start the fans on ''HIGH''---

adjust to a slower speed after the heated air is removed.

 

A 36" fan will move lots of air.

 

20" fans will be adequate, when there is an adequate quantity of them.

 

Select the size of fans and the quantity of fans, that will suffice for the size of the facility.

 

A vaned fans are beneficial.

Fans with louvers will close, when the air flow is ''off''---keeping bugs, birds, or the like from entering.

 

Exhaust the hot air at or near the roof.

Pull fresh air ''IN'' near the bottom of the facility, preferably from the shaded side of the building,

or away from direct sunlight.

 

A furnace style filter can to affixed on an inlet-fan frame or housing, for the ''air intake'' side of the building.

The filter and screens will keep those unwanted insects, dust and debris from being sucked into the building.

Screens on open windows are needed.

 

I cool down a 2000 sq foot facility with a single 36" fan, set on HI, in a matter of a few minutes,

with a couple screened windows open.

 

3-4, 20" floor style fans, suspended or located above head height, will keep the air moving nicely,

and be out of the way (head clearance).

Elevating the fans will not blow around the sawdust, on or near the floor.

 

Affix a furnace filter, over the inlet side of each of the floor style fans.

The filter will catch/trap small particles of dust.

Make the filters easily removable, so you can blow out the dust with an air compressor, or the like.

(Duct tape can be used, as a temporary hold down device, to keep the filter in place.  Place a short strip, along each edge---all four sides---holding the paper frame to the metal from on the fan).

 

The above, as described, has worked very well for me.

 

 

 

W.Osman said:

 I have a heated shop but no A/C yet so I am out there at 3 seasons.
Gets too hot in the workshop in Summer so I don't do much over summer, So its in-between and winter time, where most of my projects get done. I sometimes will use a heater over winter if its really cold, Ohh and when I get time to work on my projects.
I do my woodworking in the spring and summer when there is no rain or thunderstorms in the sky. I have a 10 x 12 shed that this summer is being expanded to 22 x 12. I hope to have electricity to it before winter hopefully. Right now it is extension cords across the yard and pull out the shop tools. Luckily, I have portable tools in my shop.
My shop is one bay of a two bay garage. Although not heated nor cooled, the seasons really don't affect when I build, just what I build. In the spring and summer I lean towards things for the yard while in fall and winter I have more inspiration for inside builds.

I build all year long and if there was more that 7 days in a week I would use them too.  Since winter is the slower time for home construction I always book in a few projects as a "fill in projects" which would take care of the things like personal Christmas and birthday gifts as well as any other special "no hurry-round to it"  builds that customeres say, "well, no hurry build it when you can."   To be fair to answer your question there is really no difference between summer and winter as far as to when I build the most. 

 I down scaled from a larger shop that was not located at home , returning back home where I began. This is an oversized double car garage.  I have remodeled most of it and it is heated and has all the lighting and the equiptment to do everything in cabinetary, furniture and art.

Right now, I use a 14ft. x 20 ft. (4.27 m x 6.10 m) shed for storage and woodworking. I have another shed where I can also store stuff. At best, I use the shed as a workshop mostly in the spring, summer and fall seasons until it becomes unbearably cold. I have a small heater which I use on cold days, the shed is not insulated and is open around the eves, so winter use is out of the question. I am hoping to build a new workshop sometime in the future.
I do  the big projects in the summer I am very limited of space in garage so I like working outside using natural light and easier to clean up and living in Michigan winter is unpretictable. 
I do my projects all year round.  I work in my basement which has the boiler in it, but it does'nt heat very well.  The majority of my projects are built in the spring and summer.  When it is warmer out, I like to do it outdoors.  It is much easier for me to handle large sheets outside because my basement door is small.
I work on projects in summer no heated garage. Last year spent most getting shop setup gathering tools still not complete never is but now ready almost finishing my table saw sled only get about one day a week warm enough to work. Ordered my Incra 1000 Hd miter gauge should take care of angle cutting. Hopefully next couple weeks weather will be getting to 60 degress during the day and staying there. This year hopefuly be able get some projects done.

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