Kreg Owners' Community

Hi Guys,

You all did me proud with responses to my beginner question about sanders for which I am very gateful. 

Now I have another beginner question for you.  My Kreg Jig Master System arrived yesterday and I am getting ready to build my workbench using it after buying some wood and other items today.  My question relates to cutting true and square so the kreg joints fit properly.  I am experienced enough to know that getting the timber square is imperative for a professional looking finish.  For example, making up a cabinet frame etc.  I can't see anyway they could be cut true enough by hand or with a circular saw.  So I am assuming I am going to need a table saw or chop saw.  Am I right in my thinking? Sorry this is a bit basic but I am very new to this. Thanks in advance.  Peter

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Hi Pete there are many ways you cut cut your timber square,  you can even make or purchase jigs to guide your saw. 

 

here are a couple of basic suggestions.

 

HANDSAW:

  • Use a square to mark out your cut lines all the way around your piece of timber and then cut along the lines.
  • Or you can use a mitre box.

CIRCULAR SAW:

  • Use a straight edge to guide your saw. 

Take your time slow and steady and you should end up with a square and straight cut.

 

 

You can certainly use a circular saw, guide the edge of the saw along a big speed square, or get a Kreg Squart Cut

they are less than $20.00.

Hi Pete!  It is indeed possible to get straight and true cuts with a circular saw. A good long straight edge clamped securly will do the trick for sheet goods. There are many variations on the market for a reasonable price. The Kreg Square Cut does a fine job on cross cuts.The other thing is making sure your blade is exactly perpendicular to the saw base. Here is where I recommend doing yourself a favor and getting a quality machinist square. (they even make little ones) These are guaranteed to be 90 degrees. I have found never to trust the 90 degree mark on a saw and not all combination squares are exact. Remember also to also get a good blade. As for table saws and compound miter saws, they're still are only going to be as good as you set them up. This is the common denominator with all power tools. But whatever way you choose to go, check for square and do test cuts. (by the way...I've learned this lesson the hard way. And, quite frankly, more than once.)

Good Luck and keep trying!

go to box store or better yet a drywajj supply store buy a steel stud and use that .Cheaper on long run,If tou go to drywall business you will get a heavier stud which will out  last you and your grandkids
Hi Pete - As others have stated, no need to buy anything. An appropriate length of straight scrap will suffice to guide the saw. Just find the offset between the shoe edge and the side of the blade and attach the guide the appropriate distance from the desired cut line. I measured the offsets on both sides of the blade on my saw and wrote them on top of the shoe in permantent marker.

Hi Pete, 

I totally agree with John. The less tools you buy when you are a beginner, the better. It's always better to start off with few basic tools and as your skill and understanding of woodworking gets better, you can save up and buy that table saw or jointer you've been lusting over :)

Using a scrap piece of wood as a guide is a good idea. I have a length of steel that i use as a guide. Or you can buy a Square cut- they're pretty cheap and a really good tool.

You can build a lot of stuff with just a circular saw, a square cut and the kreg jig. Once you have mastered these tools, buy a mitre saw and a jigsaw. Then a router, a table saw and a drill press. Then a jointer, a planer and a router table. And finally a dedicated mortiser and a bandsaw :) And when you are sick of the noise and the dust power tools make, start buying expensive hand tools- tenoning/ dovetailing saws, japanese nomi, and veritas planes :)

Is this some kind of plan??? :-)  Sounds good to me.

mo khan said:

Hi Pete, 

I totally agree with John. The less tools you buy when you are a beginner, the better. It's always better to start off with few basic tools and as your skill and understanding of woodworking gets better, you can save up and buy that table saw or jointer you've been lusting over :)

Using a scrap piece of wood as a guide is a good idea. I have a length of steel that i use as a guide. Or you can buy a Square cut- they're pretty cheap and a really good tool.

You can build a lot of stuff with just a circular saw, a square cut and the kreg jig. Once you have mastered these tools, buy a mitre saw and a jigsaw. Then a router, a table saw and a drill press. Then a jointer, a planer and a router table. And finally a dedicated mortiser and a bandsaw :) And when you are sick of the noise and the dust power tools make, start buying expensive hand tools- tenoning/ dovetailing saws, japanese nomi, and veritas planes :)

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