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I was involved in a discussion about a week about cabinet doors and face frames.  I took some time and put together a slide show showing the steps in building a door.  It is a simple flat panel  door using a 1/4 inch red oak ply-core panel and some 13/16" thick red oak lumber.  It might be of interest to some of you who are not familiar with building a cabinet door.  The process is the same with a raised panel door  other that you are using solid wood to build the raised panel and the large 3" dia bit you will see in the slideshow.

I do have a slideshow  on my page of building a raised panel door.

http://youtu.be/fES6lAPHEG8

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This is very helpful.  If I use plywood, I will not have to buy a jointer so soon.  I was planning on buying one, thinking I would be gluing up pieces of wood to make the doors.  I am also wondering the advantages and disadvantages of using solid wood vs plywood, which I know can have tear-out when you are cutting it on the table saw?  I plan on making cabinets for the new laundry room first.  That way I will be able to learn from all of my mistakes before I make the "better" cabinets for the kitchen extension.  I was measuring my current cabinets with the double doors and they are 39 wide, 31 tall and 12 inches deep.  For the backroom I was wanting to make them deeper to accommodate appliances, etc that I do not use all the time.  I was thinking 18 inches deep.  Basically making floor to ceiling cabinets.  Some of the items are heavy and with making bigger cabinets, that would add weight also.  My second thought was making cabinets with a counter and then overhead cabinets, just like in the kitchen.   Any thoughts as to possible disadvantages to making bigger/deeper cabinets?  I am torn in which way I want to go with this.  I want to go into this project knowing that what I am doing makes sense vs find out after I have started that I have made a bad choice and have to start over along with throwing away money.  So many choices.  Your thoughts and time are really appreciated.

Stephanie, as always the solid wood is the better way to go on anything involving cabinets adn especially now that all the veneer is so thin.  Even the ply wood that I buy from a cabinet supply house has become so thin that there is no room for any sanding at all and you often find chatter marks all over the ply an sometime not until you apply the finish.  It has caused me to go to making hard wood panels for anything that you can see by eye after cabinet installation.  I don't mind doing this as I only build high end cabinets anyway and never use the ply slab for doors.  It is just an alternative to the higher priced doors made of solid wood.    Think of it this was you are actually adding value to your home building the better cabinets.

 

As far as building larger cabients it is not a bad idea in most instances as you get more storage and evey a better looking cabinet with very little added cost.  I often build the upper cabinets out to 14 inches as some of the ladies now have larger plates and platters that they can not store in a 12 inch deep cabinet.  The only real restriction is building the upper too deep and cause you problems reaching the back of the counter.

 

One of the last large cabinet jobs that I did was a total custom with even extending some of the cabinets outward to change the total appearance of the kitchen and there has been times when I have mixed tall cabinets with shorter cabinets just for the look of the kitchen.  Some of these have been in multi-million dollar homes where eveything is determined by designers.  Full height cabinets are also a good idea when you can take advantage of room.  

 

A good instance where you can add not only convience but lool is the cabinets over the refrig.  In the job above that I was talking about I built the cabinet over the refrig to be 24 inches deep and then added a pull out in it where everything came out the the front of the refig where you could access it with out using a step ladder.  The front has two doors attached to it so it looks like a double door cabinet but was actually a pull out.

 

If you get to the point of rebuilding your kitchen I would be willing to look at photos of your layout and suggest to you some of the finer things that I have learned in building high end cabinets for the past quarter century.  All I would need is measurments and photos.

 

As for a jointer I do not use one very often as a person should be able to adjust and fine tune the table saw to do cut straight enought to glue up right off the saw table.  If I recall right you were having trouble with the saw adjustment and wondering if you ever got the saw straightened out./   
Stephanie H said:

This is very helpful.  If I use plywood, I will not have to buy a jointer so soon.  I was planning on buying one, thinking I would be gluing up pieces of wood to make the doors.  I am also wondering the advantages and disadvantages of using solid wood vs plywood, which I know can have tear-out when you are cutting it on the table saw?  I plan on making cabinets for the new laundry room first.  That way I will be able to learn from all of my mistakes before I make the "better" cabinets for the kitchen extension.  I was measuring my current cabinets with the double doors and they are 39 wide, 31 tall and 12 inches deep.  For the backroom I was wanting to make them deeper to accommodate appliances, etc that I do not use all the time.  I was thinking 18 inches deep.  Basically making floor to ceiling cabinets.  Some of the items are heavy and with making bigger cabinets, that would add weight also.  My second thought was making cabinets with a counter and then overhead cabinets, just like in the kitchen.   Any thoughts as to possible disadvantages to making bigger/deeper cabinets?  I am torn in which way I want to go with this.  I want to go into this project knowing that what I am doing makes sense vs find out after I have started that I have made a bad choice and have to start over along with throwing away money.  So many choices.  Your thoughts and time are really appreciated.

I did get my table saw adjusted.  Friends hubby came over,  we took the back panel off and had to loosen three of the four bolts holding the saw to adjust it back.  Must be the vibration over time?  Not sure why it went out of alignment.  But he tightened it up super tight this time.  

I have no plans to change the cabinets in my kitchen, other then the one over the frig.  Funny you mentioned that.  I want to move it forward so you can actually get to it.  Stupid design.  Never understand it.  But the main thing, is that I am moving my washer/dryer from the garage into a new room inside the house.  Cabinets are a must.  It is an 8 1/2 x 6 ft room.  Looking forward to making basic cabinets in that room for mostly storage, etc.  It is the added space off the kitchen that I want to make cabinets more custom for overflow kitchen stuff.  I don't need high-end, just nice and matching the kitchen cabinets that I have.  I really like them, they are simple.  Definite added value, but I am doing it more for me.  I have a small kitchen, which is fine, I just need storage for those things that I need but do not use that often.  I am more concerned with spending the money on the new kitchen cabinets vs the ones for the laundry room.  I want them to look the same, since the bathroom also has the same cabinets as the kitchen.  Might as well make everything match.  I need to find out cost and see if the extra money for solid wood is much different.  If not, going that route would be my preferred method.  Two of my challenges is figuring out the cabinet layout for the laundry room.  I want to include a tall cabinet to accommodate my vacuum, hot mop, etc.  Would like to get that out of the coat closet.  But I am not sure with how the washer/drier is going in, if what space I have left will allow it.  My second challenge is figuring out the layout of the kitchen cabinets.  I have appliances and baking stuff that I want to figure out the best type of cabinet to make so things can be organized nicely behind closed doors.  This is all very exciting.  So much information out there, it can get overwhelming for sure.

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