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I hope there's an electrician out there, because I am not.  I have a 220v outlet in my garage for my table saw etc.  I just recently ordered a new table saw, 3hp and it calls for 230v.  Do I need to have some wiring done?? Thanks in advance

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Yeah, I'm still a baby yet, but that's a good idea.  I have a planer too, but those knots always seemed to nick the blades so I would cut around them. LOL!  I will call my guys on Monday and see if they'll do that for me, they're great folks over there.  They charge me $25 on top of your order to plane the lumber for me, but their machine snipes real bad so I just have them take it to 7/8 to knock the cobb off and I finish it up from there.

Jay Boutwell said:

Justin what I have done is contacted local mills and lumber dealers and tell them to set aside any of the rough wood that most people refuse to take.  Since i have my own thickness planner I get the roughest stuff I can find. run a metal detector across it and fling it through the planner.  Sometime It is like diamonds in the rough, looks pretty bad until you polish it up abit.   I have made several thousand dollars from cast off wood just using the epony trick and have made some cabinets that people have seen and want the same, looking me up to build some.  It may sound strange but I often find better lumber in used stuff that you can get paying top dollar for in the lumber brokers and yards.  It's just money in the pocket when you do.

 I know you are young yet and have alot of years ahead of you and have the talent and interest in building so I'm just throwing things at you that I learned over the years.  maybe it will be of help and or give you an idea. lol

NO!  Only if the plug does not fit the receptacle you have.  The old school electricity terminology for residential service was 110V/220V.  Electric utilities then realized that it was more efficient to transmit a higher voltage so since the 1950's they have been supplying 120V/240V to residences but us of the old school still refer to it as 220 volt even though is you measure the voltage it has been 240 for 50 years.  Refrigeration compressors and motors of all kinds have been rated for 230 volt but designed to handle a 10% higher voltage perfectly fine to allow for utility power fluctuations.  Unlike low voltage which will burn the motors out, a higher voltage will not hurt the motors.  Bottom line is go ahead and plug your saw into what you are referring to as a 220 volt receptacle.
(Disregard the above comment as I thought about it some more)  Maybe. But not because of the voltage. For the last 50 years electric utilities have been providing power to residential areas that is 120V/240V. Your reference to 220V is an old school term from years ago. Your saw motor is rated for 230V to be more universal for the various markets they sell into but they are capable of utilizing a voltage rated at 10% over the rating. Conversely with a lower voltage they can withstand an unreliable utility fluctuation much better without burning out from low voltage. What will drive whether you need to do any electrical work is the receptacle in your garage mating up with the plug that came with your new saw. If they match, they are both the same amperage rating. The new saw may have a 240V 30A plug on it and if you still have a 20 amp receptacle you will have to change the receptacle but also at your service entrance box you will have to upgrade the circuit breaker that fuses the receptacle to 30 amp. NOW, if it is a 20 amp receptacle and fuse or circuit breaker installed currently and your saw requires a 30 amp receptacle, chances are you have only 12 ga. wire and that will have to be replaced with 10 ga. wire to meet electrical code as well as not overheat and cause a fire.
220 or 230 is no different.  Refers to the nominal RMS voltage.  If your existing outlet matches the plug on the saw - plug it in & make chips!

A single phase 230 volt motor will work just fine on any standard United States single phase 3 wire electrical service. Typically 120/240 volts.  There seems to be some confusion about if it is 220 volts, 230 volts or 240 volts. On a 60 cycle single phase system, which is a the standard for the USA the voltage averages 115-125/230-250 volts, usually on the lower end.  I have been an electrician for over  40 years and hold a California electricians license.  You need to know how many amps the motor draws at 230 volts to know if you need a 20 or 30 amp circuit.  Up to 15 amps a 20 amp circuit is ok, 16 to 25 amps needs a 30 amp circuit.  Good Luck.  If you have a Home Depot or Lowes near you they should be able to help you with finding a qualified electrical contractor if you need one.

Kevin H. Criswell


Kevin, I have 12 guage wire run to my outlet on a 20 amp breaker.  The saw calls for a 20 amp breaker and draws 12.8 amps. 
Kevin H. Criswell said:

A single phase 230 volt motor will work just fine on any standard United States single phase 3 wire electrical service. Typically 120/240 volts.  There seems to be some confusion about if it is 220 volts, 230 volts or 240 volts. On a 60 cycle single phase system, which is a the standard for the USA the voltage averages 115-125/230-250 volts, usually on the lower end.  I have been an electrician for over  40 years and hold a California electricians license.  You need to know how many amps the motor draws at 230 volts to know if you need a 20 or 30 amp circuit.  Up to 15 amps a 20 amp circuit is ok, 16 to 25 amps needs a 30 amp circuit.  Good Luck.  If you have a Home Depot or Lowes near you they should be able to help you with finding a qualified electrical contractor if you need one.

Kevin H. Criswell

No 220-230 same thing.
Thanks everyone for your help  with this!!
Hi there no you wil not have to have anthing done it will say on your new saw 220v to 240v
Please give me a call      480 969 6186   I will help you with your electrical installation    thom

if you have 2 seperate breakers powering the 220 outlet it is not wired right..it should be ONE breaker that fills 2 normal 110 slots.. the plug will probably fit the wall.. a dryer plug is 220 and a 110 for the motor, not the same..

the 220 breaker must be one solid switch.. 10 g is correct for wire.

best to run a seperate breaker and wire if unsure..and have a second 220 outlet! like for a compressor or larger dust collector!

 

good luck

My 220v is on one breaker and I actually do have 2 220v outlets in my garage.  One for the Jointer and one for the table saw.  My dust collector is on 110 since it can't be wired for 220, but is on it's own breaker and separated from everything else.  I have a 20 amp breakers for my 220 and have 12-3 wired run for that service.  The new saw calls for a 20 amp breaker, but if I need to upgrade it isn't a big deal, it's only 20 ft of wire and a new breaker.

tom flannery said:

if you have 2 seperate breakers powering the 220 outlet it is not wired right..it should be ONE breaker that fills 2 normal 110 slots.. the plug will probably fit the wall.. a dryer plug is 220 and a 110 for the motor, not the same..

the 220 breaker must be one solid switch.. 10 g is correct for wire.

best to run a seperate breaker and wire if unsure..and have a second 220 outlet! like for a compressor or larger dust collector!

 

good luck

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