Kreg Owners' Community

Built with professionals and hobbyists in mind, the Kreg Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine is packed with features that will have you building with twice the speed and half the effort of a standard pocket-hole jig. 


With the all-new Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine, creating perfect pocket holes is extremely fast and easy. Simply pull the large control handle to start the powerful 110-volt motor, clamp your workpiece securely in place, and raise the drill bit through the table. This simple operation drills a precisely-placed pocket hole at the perfect depth in materials from 1/2"- to 1-1/2"-thick, while built-in dust collection keeps your work area clean as you work.


To ensure perfect pocket-hole placement, the Foreman features an adjustable fence that positions your workpiece for precise pocket depth, and pair of adjustable, spring-loaded stops that provide repeatable accuracy. Markings in the rigid, cast-aluminum table make it easy to position the fence for the three most commonly used material thicknesses: 1/2", 3/4", and 1-1/2".

Light-but-durable construction makes the Foreman perfect for use in the shop, around the home, and on the go. This hardworking machine weighs just 20 pounds and has a lockable handle for safe and easy transport. Even with this portability, the Foreman still features a large table to hold big boards and support pieces made from sheet goods. The table flips up to allow easy access to the motor and quick-change drill chuck, plus a built-in storage tray that keeps extra bits and accessories organized and within close reach.

On top of all of these great features, the Foreman is the first pocket-hole machine that creates all three Kreg Joint™ sizes: Standard, Micro-Pocket™, and HD (Heavy-Duty). The Foreman comes with the standard bit and drill guide, but you can easily switch to Micro-Pocket™ or HD any time you want to.

The Foreman’s innovative features make it possible for anyone—whether you are a professional woodworker, a hobbyist, a contractor, or a do-it-yourselfer—to create strong, tight-fitting pocket joints with the speed and precision only a Kreg pocket-hole machine can provide. And the Foreman does it at a price that’s easy to afford. Combine it all, and it’s easy to see that the all-new Kreg Foreman is your high-speed solution for pocket-hole construction.

Learn everything you need to know about the new Kreg Foreman HERE.
Retails for $399.99 (U.S.)

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Ken;

 

It is actually 120 volts, 5.0 amps, 2800 rpm on page 3 of the owners manual.

The original electric foreman was 3/4 hp , Kreg has not said what the HP of this new model.

 

Jeff
Ken Darga said:

Motor HP

Rating 110V 5A = 550W

1 HP = 740W

therefore 550W = 0.74HP

I don't believe it's nearly a 3/4HP motor.

Perhaps the 5amp rating is the FLA.

On amazon.co.uk someone is selling these for £1,855!

Pete

Rick Easley said:

i think the tool looks interesting and definitely easy to use, at least from the video, but I don't think I would pay $400 for it. Seems a bit over priced. Is that the final price or is that still being decided upon?

Peter, do you have a link?

Peter Newman said:

On amazon.co.uk someone is selling these for £1,855!

Pete

Rick Easley said:

i think the tool looks interesting and definitely easy to use, at least from the video, but I don't think I would pay $400 for it. Seems a bit over priced. Is that the final price or is that still being decided upon?



Andy H said:

I think he is referring to this one which is different to the new model you have coming out.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cutting-Edge-Kreg-Foreman-Pocket-Machine/dp...

Wow! Yes, that is an interesting price. We are checking it out. Thank you for pointing it out. Andy, you are correct. The Foreman Pocket-Hole Machine being sold at the above link is the pneumatic version of the one that is being discontinued (Item# DB110).

Ah.  That explains it a bit :-)

Sorry :-(

Pete

     I'm wondering how many people will buy the Foreman when the K5 has so recently been on the market. how many woodworkers will invest $400.00 in this new Kreg jig unless they are truely  putting out a lot of projects. it seems to be a very good jig but for the weekend wood warriors and hobbyist it may be a lot. maybe I'm wrong but i would have promoted the Foreman first and then the K5, then for many maybe the Foreman would have been enough for many of the woodworkers more familiar with Kreg jigs, and save the K5 for newcomers. I bought the K5 and i think it's a great jig but being that it's only been 3 weeks owning it i don't think i would pop $400.00 for another jig. I have several other jigs and i have to ask myself how many do I need. if I were a business maybe.

Jay,

The K5 has been on the market for sometime now.

The K5 requires the user to use a separate drilling tool, for boring the pocket holes.

This unit is ideally suited for drilling a few holes, short runs and where frequent set-ups are required---

ex such as building a bookcase, a single or a few cabinets, or the like.

The NEW Foreman DB210 Pocket Hole drilling machine, is an electrically operated semi-auto drilling machine, that incorporates an integral motor.

The DB210 is ideally suited for drilling lots of holes, such as in a cabinet shop, for production use,  or

someone who is a hobbyist that has a large quantity of pocket holes to drill.

For drilling a high volume of holes, the costs of the machine is justified.

One can make a set-up, for repetitive drilling operations, and drill-away, all day long.

It's faster, easier and more productive.

The DB210 is capable of drilling literally thousands of holes in much less time.

Some can justify the costs of the Foreman machine.

I like the features the DB210 offers, as well as being portable and can be taken to a job site,

for drilling and product assembly.

It'll sure come in handy, in such instances, as building a wall of bookcases.

Cut all your pieces to size in the shop---

transport them in a small vehicle---

take them to the job site---

drill the pocket holes on site,

and assemble.

Much handier and faster than making up all the sub-assembly units in the shop, loading and protecting them,  trucking them to the job site and installing them.

Works for me.

JAY DOBBS said:

     I'm wondering how many people will buy the Foreman when the K5 has so recently been on the market. how many woodworkers will invest $400.00 in this new Kreg jig unless they are truely  putting out a lot of projects. it seems to be a very good jig but for the weekend wood warriors and hobbyist it may be a lot. maybe I'm wrong but i would have promoted the Foreman first and then the K5, then for many maybe the Foreman would have been enough for many of the woodworkers more familiar with Kreg jigs, and save the K5 for newcomers. I bought the K5 and i think it's a great jig but being that it's only been 3 weeks owning it i don't think i would pop $400.00 for another jig. I have several other jigs and i have to ask myself how many do I need. if I were a business maybe.

I received the Foreman 210 2 days ago. When I began using it I noticed the wood pulls to the right when the arm is depressed resulting in a angled hole and significant tearout. This is despite multiple adjustments to the clamping pad. When I examined the product I found the drill but is not properly aligned. It is cutting into the metal where the bit comes up through the table top. This is on the right side only. The jig is not usable in it's present condition. Is there any way to adjust the bit or motor assembly so the bit is correctly aligned?

  Hi B A Keagy,  I have the foreman and have bored several hundred holes with it and do not have the problem.  I would suspect that what you are feeling is the rotation of the bit cutting the wood.  It is necessary to also hold the wood towards the end and push down on the wood.  It is important to  have the clamp adjusted tight enough that it holes the material tight down against the table .   Because the clamp is clamping the stock in a round pattern the stock will have a tendency to want to move as the bit engages the wood and begins to bore the hole, unless you have control of it.  It is similar to that of a drill and a bit entering wood that is not secured to a solid surface.  It will spin and it spins to the right just like what you are feeling with the pocket hole machine.  The smaller the stock the more it will want to move as you drill into it there fore the more pressure it will take to secure the stock.  The reason is that there is less surface for friction on the solid surface and in this case the table top surface.  If boring the ends of stock such as will be used in face frames or end to surface butt joints the wood grain will also cause you some added resistance to the bit and again will cause the adverse effects, 

However it sounds like you may have a defective assembled machine and I would be calling the Kreg Tool company about it.  With the drill out of alignment then it would definitely be causing the problem
 
B A Keagy said:

 I received the Foreman 210 2 days ago. When I began using it I noticed the wood pulls to the right when the arm is depressed resulting in a angled hole and significant tearout. This is despite multiple adjustments to the clamping pad. When I examined the product I found the drill but is not properly aligned. It is cutting into the metal where the bit comes up through the table top. This is on the right side only. The jig is not usable in it's present condition. Is there any way to adjust the bit or motor assembly so the bit is correctly aligned?

Have not seen many comment,s on the new KREG Foreman lately, did read the review,s that are posted and the best one was from JAY !! Think this is a very good machine , but for the small shop,s a bit high on the price , also think they should give all the drill bit,s and guides with the machine !!!  Just received a flyier from Woodcraft today and they are offering a micro bit and sleeve  free , for the same price  as KREG !!!!  How about it KREG can you match this ?????  Have a great day , JIM !!!

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