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Good morning,

 

I'm looking to buy a new circular saw? Does anyone have any recommendations, not too expensive?

 

Thanks

Gary

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Hi Gary - Personally, I've got a 20+ year old Milwaukee that will likely outlive me. Many, many good brands out there; Milwaukee, Makita, DeWalt, Metabo, Bosch, Hitachi, Ridgid...... etc. I would recommend getting a contractor grade saw... none of the WalMart, K-Mart, Harbor Freight.... etc.. stuff. The good ones are not a lot of difference in money than the junk, especially if you check out the reconditioned market.

http://cpooutlets.com/our-network-of-stores/

I have a Porter Cable that has served me fairly well for the past couple years, I think it was around $60.
I have the same porter cable from Lowes about $60 .
hi gary, i have two, one corded and one cordless that i would recommend. the corded one is a proter cable, left hand one, the blade in on the oppistite side you would be used too. for me being right handed its easier to see the blade when cutting, it was about $130 from lowes, they also have a right hand one. the cordless one is a ridgid, dont know the price of it cause it came in a kit. really like both saws, would buy either one again in a heartbeat, hope this helps.

The choice in a circular saw depends on what you plan to use it for.

 

For building construction, houses and the like, doing heavy-duty work, cutting and ripping of 2x building materials, large sheet goods, and the like, the Skil worm-drive is the way to go.  A 7-1/2" for the bigger lumber, or a 6" for smaller jobs.  The 6" model is a little lighter in weight---and handier for roofing and small buildings construction.

This machine a real work horse.

 

I have a Skil 7-1/2" worm-drive model that is over 30 years old, and is still going strong.  It does not slow down, going thru the thick materials.  I've even ripped 6x6 post materials, and cut thru 2x12's, with no slow down.  It'll cut thru wet lumber with no problem.

NOTE:  use carbide tipped saw blades for best results.

 

For an all-purpose saw, a 7-1/2" saw blade size model, is the most universal.
Look for models with more horsepower---the lighter/smaller HP models won't be satisfactory---

they don't don't have enough power for continuous use, and they ''overheat''.

Look for models with ''HIGH'' rpm ratings---this is most important to obtain smooth cuts,

especially plywoods.

For continuous duty use, a corded model is the way to go.

 

For light duty and intermittent use---cutting smaller shaped objects, thin panels, and the like, a 5-6" size saw blade model is a good choice.

I have a 5" cordless style, that does great for the smaller tasks---such as trim, thinner lumber, sheet goods and plastic sheeting.  The only drawback, is that I use up a fully charged battery, ripping a 2x4, 8ft long---the battery just doesn't have enough storage capacity for the bigger jobs at hand. 

It's only good for light-duty use.

 

For cross-cutting and ripping thinner materials, up to 3/4"---such as trim, moldings, flooring, and the like,

a flooring saw (Skill 3600) is the cats pajamas.  Great for on the job cutting operations---plenty of power, low profile, easy to carry around and set-up.  Some home centers display this model in their flooring goods department.

 

Shop around at various tool centers---compare models and prices---also compare features the ease of handling.  

 

Invest in ''carbide'' tooth saw blades---they perform superior to the ''plain-jane'' saw blades.  Several are available on todays market---from all-purpose cutting to ''ultra-fine'' cutting operations.  

Check-out the manufacturers data sheets and compare the saws blades uses---very helpful info.

 

Stick with the name brand construction grade equipment---the household models are not worth the investment---you'll waste your money.  The performance is sub-par to none.  

 

You might find a good used model at a pawn shop--- but, don't pay more than 50% of a new asking price, for one in good condition. Lots of bargains, on todays market.

 

Look for sales, compare features and price----buy the best you can afford.

Ryobi offers a line of corded and cordless power tools, offered by Home-Depot. 

They are suitable for the homeowner/do-it-yourselfer---performance is acceptable.

 

Ryobi offers affordable tools, for a person on a limited budget, and for those who need tools for occasional use, such as the homeowner and occasional builder/remodeler.

 

I have several Ryobi power tools---they all perform well.

They are very handy for those smaller and lighter duty tasks.

 

The ''18 one+'' line of tools, are battery operated---their batteries are all interchangeable.

 

Ryobi offers starter kits from about $100.

 

Check 'em out

http://www.ryobitools.com/

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Search?keyword=r...

 

For daily construction and heavy-duty use, contractor grade power corded tools are the way to go.

I had a craftsman for about 25 years, built two houses with it, but within the last year I bought a new Ridgid, lot lighter weight and I am very impressed with it, cost was around $95 but I think well worth it.

Ken Darga said:

Ryobi offers a line of corded and cordless power tools, offered by Home-Depot. 

They are suitable for the homeowner/do-it-yourselfer---performance is acceptable.

 

Ryobi offers affordable tools, for a person on a limited budget, and for those who need tools for occasional use, such as the homeowner and occasional builder/remodeler.

 

I have several Ryobi power tools---they all perform well.

They are very handy for those smaller and lighter duty tasks.

 

The ''18 one+'' line of tools, are battery operated---their batteries are all interchangeable.

 

Ryobi offers starter kits from about $100.

 

Check 'em out

http://www.ryobitools.com/

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Search?keyword=r...

 

For daily construction and heavy-duty use, contractor grade power corded tools are the way to go.

Mine is a corded model not a fan of battery circularsaw.

Gary roofner said:
I have the same porter cable from Lowes about $60 .

Gary,

To each his own.

If one only has a need for one saw or drill, then a corded model is the way to go.

 

I find cordless power tools very handy, for many uses.

I don't have to drag around all those cords---a couple 100ft long, 3-4 50ft, 3-4 25footers, plus various adapter plugs/outlet boxes, for multiple tools working close together in the immediate vicinity area.

 

I use several cords, as needed, for connecting a variety of different power tools on one job-site/area.

Much more efficient/productive.

Sometimes I need 3 or more drills, set up with various drill bits, drivers, tips, or the like.

Ex, as in prepping holes for fasteners---pilot holes, clearance holes, counter-sink/counter-bore holes and a driving tool.

The quick-change hex adapters are very handy---quick insertion and removal of the bit/tool---saves lots of time making changes---don't have to bother with the key chucks---not all key chucks are the same.  ( I keep my key chuck tethered to the applicable corded tool.

 

I use several different cordless power tools---drills, drivers, grinders, saws, trim routers, caulking guns, just to name a few.

When doing a lot of work, like some all day jobs, for a variety of tasks, I have 4 battery stations set-up, and keep 10-12 batteries charged and ready to go.  When one battery wears down, make a quick change, plug it into the charger, and keep going and alternating---I can change batteries before the dust settles.

 

The corded power tools are also ideal for working outdoors, under wet conditions---less likely to get zapped.

 

There are many corded power tools, such as the Roto-Zip, with its ''high-speed'' cutting, and routers,  that are most ideal for many applications/uses---(not available in cordless models).

 

Ryobi has a battery operated ''speed-saw'', that is a very handy tool---I use it frequently. 

It's very handy for sharpening lawn mower blades, (using the proper stone), without removing the blade from the machine---

as well as many grinding and cutting operations---such as, grinding stones, cut-off wheels, round raps, carbide burrs, and the like.  

CAUTION: DO NOT use this machine for wire brushes---the tool runs at a very high-speed, (like a router), which will cause the fine wires to break-off and potentially cause some serious damage.

Just make sure you wear safety glasses, or better yet, a face shield.

 

For wire brushing operations, sanding operations and some grinding operations, an angle grinder is the way to go.

 


Gary roofner said:

Mine is a corded model not a fan of battery circularsaw.


I favor YELLOW TOOLS

i think it was ken darga who mentioned to look into high HP and RPM ratings so i would like to know ---

because im getting a circular saw as well, for a diy/weekender/hobbyist use only, i would like to know how much  is enough to be considered good.

i was at homedepot earlier and im leaning on a SKIL SAW rated at 2.3HP, 4600RPM and 13AMPS priced at $59.

http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResu...

 

 

Joey,

Sound like a good choice and price---for for it.

You'll appreciate the high-speed, for those smooth cuts.

It's got some good rating, at my nearby HD---they sell several of those models.

Joey said:

i think it was ken darga who mentioned to look into high HP and RPM ratings so i would like to know ---

because im getting a circular saw as well, for a diy/weekender/hobbyist use only, i would like to know how much  is enough to be considered good.

i was at homedepot earlier and im leaning on a SKIL SAW rated at 2.3HP, 4600RPM and 13AMPS priced at $59.

http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResu...

 

 

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