Kreg Owners' Community

Hello,

What type of wood is good to start with?  As I know I will be making lots of mistakes, I don't want to spend alot.  

Thanks and regards,

Rey 

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Start with plywood and pine.

I think it partly will depend on the tools that you have available to work with.  If you are using a table saw and can rip the wood to size/thickness, I have found that the kiln-dried Doug-Fir 2x4 studs that Home Depot sells for about $2 each are a good choice to start/practice with.  I often use them to try out a new technique or design.  Not too expensive and if you like what you've made you can even stain and finish them and they'll pass for something "better".

I keep lots of 2x material around---very handy to make many projects.

2x material can be ripped and machined to an applicable size and shape, assembled together, to make many usable projects.

Several joinery methods can be used to join pieces together.

  This style router bit can be used to make butted joints---

butting pieces side-by-side, or end to end, to make larger pieces.

Rockler Wedge Tongue and Groove Bit

Pine. It is soft and easy to work with and most of all ................cheap!

Thank you gentlemen for your responses!!

Hello Reynolds,

   I always like working with Ash when I don't want to have to much in a project. I get it from the local mill for about $1.50 a board ft. It machines very well and when stained looks exactly like red oak. Once it has been shaped the edges hold up real well to sanding.

  You can do some neat work with 2x pine material, but if you are buying construction grade pine, it is only dried to 20% before shipping. If the wood is not dry enough, it can cause numerous problems down the road. If you want good clear pine it can cost more than a lot of hardwoods. I do use cheaper pine for some small projects and test runs, but I tend to like the hardwoods better.

I suppose the best answer is to find out what woods are available in your area.

What is your first project?  How big is it?

Select-grade pine costs the most.  Sometimes, after looking through a number of #2-grade pine boards, I have been able to buy #2 pine boards which only have one knot at one end or along one edge, so that after I crosscut the board or rip the board, the knot is in the waste and I end up with a Select-grade workpiece.  Also, I have used poplar.

I like maple.  It stains well. looks good, and is relatively cheap.  All of the bigbox stores I go to handle it.  SHop around a little for rice, though.

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